Biology Courses

 

Medical Terminology BIO 118

This course is designed for students with an active interest in the medical and paramedical fields. The course provides the student with the fundamental principles needed to understand medical vocabulary. The student will learn to use the techniques of word building with an emphasis on spelling, pronunciation and the meanings of medical terms.

  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.

Principles of Biology BIO 139

  • Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundation courses.
  • Term: Fall, Summer (even).
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: General Education option.

Nutrition Through the Life Cycle BIO 141

Fundamentals of nutrition and its effect on the individual’s growth, development, and total health; related topics of current concern, including weight control, dietary fats, fiber, and world health; impact of culture and environment on food choices. Computer nutrition analysis.

  • Prerequisites: MTH 099.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.

Biology I: From Molecules to Cells BIO 150

Biology 150 is a course which, together with Biology 151, is designed to give the student a broad experi¬ence in the biological sciences. This course provides an introduction to the cellular and molecular aspects of biology, with an emphasis on biochemistry, cell structure and function, and genetics. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

  • Co-requisites: MTH 100, ENG 108.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: General Education option for science majors only.

Biology II: Unity and Diversity of Life BIO 151

This course is designed to give the student a broad experience in the biological sciences. In this course we deal mainly with the organismal and supra-organismal levels of biological organization. Evolution will be the unifying theme. The diversity, form, function, and ecology of organisms will be covered, with particular emphasis on plants and animals. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, MTH 100, ENG 108.
  • Term: Winter.
  • Fee: Yes.

Ecology and the Environment BIO 201

This course is a survey of the basic scientific concepts underlying ecology and an examination of how humans interact with, depend upon, and affect natural resources and ecosystems. Special attention will be paid to the magnitude and scope of global and local environmental problems, with a focus on measures that can be taken by individuals and communities to address those problems. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills and use of the scientific method. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107.
  • Term: Fall (even), Summer (odd).
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: General Education option. Cross-listed with ENV 201.

General Zoology BIO 226

This course is a study of animal origins and evolutionary relationships. Beginning with an introduction to the classification of the animal kingdom, the major groups of invertebrate and some vertebrate animals will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on development, structure, function, reproduction, and evolution. Laboratory exercises will enable the student to directly observe internal and external morphology of selected animal groups and will provide for observations and experiments with various living organisms. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151.
  • Term: Winter (odd).
  • Fee: Yes.

General Botany BIO 234

This course deals with a survey of the algae, the fungi, and members of the plant kingdom. Students study the process of photosynthesis and its relevance to life on our planet. They then study the life cycles and reproduction of plants. Transport systems of vascular plants are covered in detail. In addition the anatomy and physiology of all plant-like organisms, their growth and development is studied. The current success and diverse numbers and species of plants are related to their evolutionary success and role in the earth’s ecosystems. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151.
  • Term: Fall (odd).
  • Fee: Yes.

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology BIO 257

A survey of human anatomy and physiology with selected labs. Topics include cells, metabolism, tissue and skin. Also includes the skeletal and articular, muscular, digestive, circulatory and lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, reproductive, and nervous systems. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundation courses.
  • Term: Winter, Summer.
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: General Education option.

Anatomy and Physiology I BIO 271

This course is a study of human anatomy and physiology and how the human body functions through the interactions of the various systems of the body from the tissue to the organ levels of organization with hands on labs. Topics include: tissues and the following systems: integumentary, skeletal and articular, muscular, endocrine, nervous, and their major diseases. This class is not for general education; it is specifically for science majors and minors. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150; BIO 118 recommended.
  • Term: Fall.
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: Designed for science majors and minors - not for general education.

Anatomy and Physiology II BIO 272

This course focuses on gross and microscopic structure and function of, as well as, an emphasis on homeostatic control mechanisms of each system. This course includes a lab component that focuses on practical applications of the material presented in lecture. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of anatomical and physiological aspects of the blood and cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance, and reproductive system. This class is not for general education; it is specifically for science majors and minors. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 271;
  • Term: Winter.
  • Fee: Yes.
  • Note: Designed for science majors and minors - not for general education.

Microbiology BIO 321

This course covers principles of microbiology, including microbial structure, metabolism, and growth. With emphasis on microorganisms and human disease, this course explores identification and control of pathogens, disease transmission, and epidemiology. This course includes a laboratory component that focuses on practical applications of the material presented in lecture. This course is not for general education; it is specifically for science majors and minors. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150 and one semester of chemistry.
  • Term: Fall.
  • Fee: Yes.

The Teaching of Biology BIO 347

Philosophical basis for science teaching; survey of special programs in biology; specific objectives, materials and curriculum planning for biology; emphasis on role of laboratory in biology teaching. Observations of classroom/laboratory teaching.

  • Prerequisites: Admittance into Phase III Teacher Certification Candidate.
  • Term: Winter. Offered as needed.

Biochemistry BIO 360

Biochemistry 360 is an advanced-level course for students majoring in chemistry or biology. This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemical properties of living systems. Topics include the structure, function and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; enzyme kinetics and regulation. The principles of bioenergetics and the integration of metabolic control will be developed. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 140, CHM 325.
  • Term: Winter (even).
  • Fee: Yes. Cross-listed with BIO 360.

Cooperative Field Experience BIO 388

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

  • Prerequisites: Junior standing, biology major, departmental approval.
  • Term: Fall, Winter, Summer.

Special Topics in Biology BIO 410

Selected topics and issues in biology as chosen by the instructor.

  • Prerequisites: Junior status in the major.
  • Term: TBA.

Genetics BIO 485

Exploration of classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics including, but not limited to, Mendelian principles of inheritance, gene linkage and mapping, pedigree analysis, structure and chemistry of genes, gene expression, recombinant DNA technology, mutations and their repair, non-Mendelian inheritance, quantitative inheritance, and population genetics.. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151, CHM 140, CHM 325.
  • Recommended: MTH 325.
  • Term: Fall (odd).
  • Fee: Yes.

Cooperative Field Experience BIO 488

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

  • Prerequisites: Senior standing; biology major; departmental approval.
  • Term: Fall, Winter, Summer.

Cell and Molecular Biology BIO 490

A thorough examination of the basic structure and function of cells, with an emphasis on the integration of structure and function in eukaryotic cells. Topics include cell-cycle growth and death, molecular transport, traffic, signaling, cellular interactions. The course also covers the application of current cellular and molecular biological techniques. Laboratory included.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151; CHM 140, CHM 325; BIO 321 recommended.
  • Term: Winter (odd).
  • Fee: Yes.

Independent Study BIO 491

Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement. 

  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; biology major or minor; Junior status.
  • Term: Fall, Winter, Summer.

Junior Seminar ISC 312

Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS. Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work. In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports. The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one. A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity. This is the program’s writing intensive course.

  • Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major; ENG 312.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.

Science Senior Seminar: Library Research ISC 496A

This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project. Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B. Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

  • Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.

Science Senior Seminar: Laboratory Research ISC 496B

This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member. The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

  • Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major.
  • Term: Fall, Winter.
  • Fee: Yes.

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