Frank D. Rashid

Professor of English

Frank D. Rashid received his B.A. in English and his Ph.D. in English from the University of Detroit. He has taught at Marygrove College since 1980 and served as department chair from 1998 until 2007. He has been president of the Marygrove Faculty Assembly since 2008. He is a founding member of Marygrove's Institute for Detroit Studies (IDS) and, with history professor Thomas Klug, teaches an interdisciplinary course, Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis. Rashid is editor of the Literary Map of Detroit on the IDS website. Among his publications are essays on the poetry of Robert Hayden, in Callaloo; Lawrence Joseph in PMLA, The University of Cincinnati Law Review, and Jacket 2; and Emily Dickinson in ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance and Approaches to Teaching Emily Dickinson edited by Robin Riley Fast and Christine Mack Gordon (MLA). He also researches and writes about Detroit history, politics, and culture.


ENG 108 Academic Writing

Concentration on developing students' abilities to produce analytical academic writing. Special attention to developing research skills and strategies. Students will be engaged in reading and discussing texts and writing within complex rhetorical situations. Students will work on a variety of types of written assignments ranging from short writing activities to fully-developed essays. Individual tutorial sessions will supplement class work. Students will learn to use technology as an aid to writing. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

 

  • Hours: 4
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13, Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: Placement recommendation

ENG 160 Introduction to Literature

Study and discussion of a variety of literary forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, with emphasis on critical analysis.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13; Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: General Education requirement

ENG 260 Approaches to Literary Studies

Introduction to the discipline of literary study for students majoring and minoring in English and language arts. The course emphasizes writing about literature and critical strategies and information resources. This is a writing intensive course.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall, Winter
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 160

ENG 310 American Literature to 1900

Survey of American writers of the early period, including Bradstreet, Dickinson, Douglass, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 311 American Literature: 1900 to the Present

Survey of American writers of the later period, including Ellison, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hurston, Morrison, Stevens, and Wharton.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 321 Modern Poetry

Study of major modern poets, including Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Moore, Eliot, Hughes, Bishop, Hayden, Lowell, Levine, Merwin, Plath, and Dove.

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 333 Detroit in Literature

Examination of representations of Detroit in fiction, poetry, and other artistic media produced between 1940 and the present.

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 496 Senior Seminar

In-depth critical reading, research, and analysis of a specific theme or the works of a single author. An extensive written research project and an oral presentation are required.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall, Winter
  • Prerequisite: English or Language Arts majors only, three literature courses at the 300 level, ENG 260, ENG 312, ENG 314, 20-22 hours in the major

ENG 510 Detroit in Literature

This course examines representations of Detroit in poetry and fiction produced between the 1930s and the present. By reading and discussing works of such authors as Robert Hayden, Harriet Arnow, Dudley Randall, Joyce Carol Oates, Philip Levine, Lawrence Joseph, Jim Daniels, Jeffrey Eugenides, and others, the course studies the translation of a familiar environment into literature and Òplaces' Detroit in modern American culture.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 520 Dickinson and Frost

This course examines the work of two New England poets who share not only the imagery of a common natural landscape but also a set of common philosophical and literary traditions. Course sessions will consist of close reading and explication of individual poems by the entire class and discussion of the issues raised in them.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 530 19th Century Novel

This course will examine canonical novels of the European 19th Century, such as Crime and Punishment, Madame Bovary, Sons and Lovers, and select from Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Thackeray, Zola, Bronte, and others.

  • Hours: 3

English Overview

English Overview

Marygrove's English program is designed to help students better examine and engage with the world through the development of high-level writing, reading, and critical thinking skills.

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

The CAALS brings a nationally-known author to Marygrove College each year for a public lecture and a seminar with students.

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