Darcy L. Brandel

Associate Professor of English

Darcy Lee Brandel received her B.A. in English from Allegheny College in 1999, her M.A. in English from Syracuse University in 2001, and her Ph.D. in English from Case Western Reserve University in 2006. She is currently chair of the English and Modern Languages Department. In 2007, she led the charge to establish the first Women's Center on campus and now serves on its advisory board. She also served as coordinator of the English graduate program from 2011-2013 and secretary of the Faculty Assembly from 2008-2012. Her fields of interest include literature by women, multi-ethnic literature, comparative women's studies, critical theory, aesthetic theory, creative writing, Buddhism, and translation. She has published work on Gertrude Stein, Grace Paley, and other experimental women writers and, along with Chae-Pyong Song, translations of Korean Buddhist poetry. She is currently working on her first manuscript of poetry.

 

 
 

ENG 107 Introduction to Writing

Concentration on the concepts of focus, organization, and development of expository writing. Introduction to research skills and writing, and the use of technology in composition. One additional weekly period of tutor_ing is required. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

  • Hours: 4
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13, Winter 14, Fall 14, Winter 15
  • Prerequisite: Placement recommendation

ENG 108 Academic Writing

Concentration on developing students' abilities to produce analytical academic writing. Special attention to developing research skills and strategies. Students will be engaged in reading and discussing texts and writing within complex rhetorical situations. Students will work on a variety of types of written assignments ranging from short writing activities to fully-developed essays. Individual tutorial sessions will supplement class work. Students will learn to use technology as an aid to writing. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

 

  • Hours: 4
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13, Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: Placement recommendation

ENG 160 Introduction to Literature

Study and discussion of a variety of literary forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, with emphasis on critical analysis.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13; Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: General Education requirement

ENG 206 Introduction to Poetry

Introduction to the skills required to read poetry, and to a variety of poets and poetic forms.

 

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Summer 13, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108

ENG 264 Introduction to Creative Writing

Introduction to the principles and practices of writing poetry and fiction. Students will develop their skills as writers of imaginative literature by becoming conscious of craft, becoming effective critics of each other's works, and improving their abilities to judge quality writing.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108

ENG 301 British Writers I

Survey of British writers from medieval times to the Romantic period, including Chaucer, Donne, Milton, Shakespeare, Pope, Bronte, Austen, and the Romantic poets.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 302 British Writers II

Survey of British writers from the Romantic period to the present, including Eliot, Dickens, Browning, Hardy, Joyce, Pinter, Lawrence, Lessing, and Woolf.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 311 American Literature: 1900 to the Present

Survey of American writers of the later period, including Ellison, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hurston, Morrison, Stevens, and Wharton.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 314 Literary Theory and Criticism

Study of the major trends in contemporary literary theory. Course also provides for practical experience with current methods and assumptions guiding the analysis and interpretation of literary texts.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 260, and at least two literature courses

ENG 350 World Literature

Survey of works of world literature in translation. This may include works of Asian, African, Caribbean, European, and South American writers.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 363 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

Advanced instruction in the techniques of short story and longer fiction writing. Writing workshop with student conferences. Students take part in public presentation/publication of their work.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 264

ENG 370 Literature by Women

Study of literature by women and the tradition that produces that literature. The course will examine literature from a feminist perspective.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 496 Senior Seminar

In-depth critical reading, research, and analysis of a specific theme or the works of a single author. An extensive written research project and an oral presentation are required.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall, Winter
  • Prerequisite: English or Language Arts majors only├ó three literature courses at the 300 level, ENG 260, ENG 312, ENG 314, 20-22 hours in the major

ENG 501 Foundations of Graduate English

This course introduces students to graduate studies in English literature and language. It focuses on current professional issues in the field, various contemporary theoretical approaches to literature and language, their practical implications in writing and teaching, and the principles and procedures of scholarly research.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 514 Literary Criticism

This course will focus on examination and application of the theoretical concepts and contexts that are critical to success in graduate literary studies, including such concepts as deconstruction, formalism, new historicism, and Marxism.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 535: Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature

This course will explore a range of texts that reveal the ethnic diversity of North American literature, asking readers to consider both common themes and cultural specificities found in diverse "minority" literatures. The course will explore themes and theories of alienation, fragmentation, dislocation, hybridity, borderlands/border crossing, appropriation, resistance, and generational difference. The course will pay particular attention to language and the role it plays in defining reality. The course explores the ways ethnic writers both resist and appropriate dominant languages in an attempt to formulate their own modes of communication.

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: None

ENG 539 Witchcraft and Gender

This course will explore early American notions of gender, especially as they relate to and inform the infamous witch hunts in Salem and beyond. The course will examine relevant early American literature to connect and complicate the relationship between conceptions of womanhood and the hysteria of the witch-craze.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 570 Women's Literature: Experimental Literature by Women

This course considers some established traditions in writing by women, while paying close attention to how these traditions are both revisited and revised by subsequent writers. We will consider how the texts are in dialogue with one another as well as whose voices and experiences remain silenced in various texts.  Using the historical context of the various waves of the women's movement, along with the framework of feminist theory, the course seeks to highlight both the establishment of and resistance to traditions in literature by women.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 606: Experimental Literature by Women

Many artists believe that the way to accomplish art which creates social change in the world is to resist the traditional by utilizing new forms, styles, and approaches. Challenging any kind of established literary tradition, however, often results in marginalization; therefore, for an already historically marginalized group like women writers to experiment raises the risk of being silenced, discredited, and attacked. This course considers how various women writers across the twentieth century have experimented with literary form and explores the implications of this experimentation on the authors, on notions of gender, on the world.

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: None

English Overview

English Overview

Marygrove's English program is designed to help students better examine and engage with the world through the development of high-level writing, reading, and critical thinking skills.

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

The CAALS brings a nationally-known author to Marygrove College each year for a public lecture and a seminar with students.

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