Chae-Pyong Song

Associate Professor of English

Chae-Pyong Song received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, concentrating on postcolonial Anglophone literature. He has been at Marygrove since 2001. He was coordinator of the master of arts in English program from 2007 through 2011. His research interests include 20th-century English literature, postcolonial literature, translation studies, and the globalization of culture. In addition to publications on postcolonial literature and theory, his recent translations of Korean literature have appeared on The Korea Times, New Writing from Korea, Metamorphoses: Journal of Literary Translation, WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly, and Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture. Recently he won the 40th Korean Literature Translation Awards for translating Kim Hye-soon's poems.

ENG 108 Academic Writing

Concentration on developing students' abilities to produce analytical academic writing. Special attention to developing research skills and strategies. Students will be engaged in reading and discussing texts and writing within complex rhetorical situations. Students will work on a variety of types of written assignments ranging from short writing activities to fully-developed essays. Individual tutorial sessions will supplement class work. Students will learn to use technology as an aid to writing. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

  • Hours: 4
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13, Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: Placement recommendation

ENG 160 Introduction to Literature

Study and discussion of a variety of literary forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, with emphasis on critical analysis.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Fall 13; Winter 14, Summer 14, Fall 14, Winter 15, Summer 15
  • Prerequisite: General Education requirement

ENG 314 Literary Theory and Criticism

Study of the major trends in contemporary literary theory. Course also provides for practical experience with current methods and assumptions guiding the analysis and interpretation of literary texts.

  • Hours: 3
  • Fee: Yes
  • Offered: Winter
  • Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 260, and at least two literature courses

ENG 350 World Literature

Survey of works of world literature in translation. This may include works of Asian, African, Caribbean, European, and South American writers.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 352 The Novel

Study of the development of and major themes in the genre of the novel, including such novels as Madame Bovary, David Copperfield, Crime and Punishment, and Portrait of a Lady.

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 353 Contemporary Literature of Africa

Study and discussion of contemporary African literature. This may include works of Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiongo, Ama Ata Aidoo, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, and Nuruddin Farah.

  • Hours: 3
  • Offered: Fall
  • Prerequisite: One literature course and ENG 108

ENG 501 Foundations of Graduate English

This course introduces students to graduate studies in English literature and language. It focuses on current professional issues in the field, various contemporary theoretical approaches to literature and language, their practical implications in writing and teaching, and the principles and procedures of scholarly research.

  • Hours: 3

ENG 603 Postcolonial Re-imaginations: The Empire Writes Back

This course is designed as an introduction to a wide variety of both literary and theoretical works that cover the period of British colonial expansion and its postcolonial aftermath. It is conceived as a comparative literature/culture courseƑfor instance, to put the First World literature in dialogue with that of the Third World or to re-read a 18th-century literature with a 20th-century perspective. For such comparative course, literatures from Africa, India, and the Caribbean as well as from England will be selected. Through these works, we will study what the globalization of modern culture has brought about in such areas as race, gender, language, and nationalism. 

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: ENG 501, ENG 514

ENG 620 Novel and Nation

This course will examine literary works that attempt to re-figure the nation in the age of globalization. Some of the questions we will ask are: How is the nation represented in literature? What textual strategies do novels employ in order to disseminate the feeling of national consciousness toward readers? Conversely, what formal narrative elements do novels employ to disrupt or displace the official, hegemonic notion of the nation? What kinds of alternative notions of community and belonging are imagined? What are the political implications of postcolonial fiction that resists the novelistic techniques that rely on linear notions of historical progression and economic development? How do the forces of globalization put a pressure on the fictions of national culture? How have novels gone beyond national borders for paradigms of home(land)?  In the end, students will enhance their appreciation of both the limitations and possibilities of a branch of novel theory that takes the nation-form as its primary object of inquiry. 

  • Hours: 3
  • Prerequisite: ENG 501, ENG 514

English Overview

English Overview

Marygrove's English program is designed to help students better examine and engage with the world through the development of high-level writing, reading, and critical thinking skills.

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

Contemporary American Author Lecture Series (CAALS)

The CAALS brings a nationally-known author to Marygrove College each year for a public lecture and a seminar with students.

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