Henry Revell, Jr. Part 2

Henry Revell, Jr.

Summary:

Henry Revell began playing baseball with his family at age 9 and loved it "more than food to eat." He learned how to pitch from his father, and used to play three innings during his lunch break from farm work. During his four years of high school, the only person to hit a home run off of one of his pitches was George Altman, who became the first black player for the Chicago Cubs. Mr. Revell hadn't seriously considered attending college, but after a day-long try-out with a North Carolina A & T coach, he was awarded a baseball scholarship to A & T, where he majored in agriculture. He entered the service after graduation and played ball there as well, doing his best to focus on his technique while facing discrimination as the team's only black player. He says, "It’s just been a beautiful experience and I wouldn’t trade it for anything."




Listen to Interview:

  • Date Interviewed: Sunday, 01 August 2010
  • Interviewer: Noah Purcell

Collections

Civil Rights Experiences

Download Transcript

Download henry_revell_2.pdf

Marygrove Archives ARC-SP 0100 File #22

 

You are free to share (copy, distribute and transmit) this work under conditions set forth in this Creative Commons license.

Example of proper citation/attribution:

Scher, D. (Interviewer) & Revell, H., Jr. (Interviewee). (2010). Henry Revell, Jr.: Civil Rights Movement [Interview transcript]. Retrieved from the Novak Archive at Marygrove College: https://www.marygrove.edu/detroit-journeys

Detroit Journeys Collection

Detroit Journeys Collection

The Detroit Journeys Collection features interviews focusing on the experiences of individuals migrating within the U.S. or from outside the U.S. to Detroit, Michigan.

Experiences Collection

Experiences Collection

The Experiences Collection features two sections. The first section includes interviews with women from Bennett College who participated in the Woolworth's Lunch Counter civil rights demonstration in Greensboro, North Carolina. The second section includes interviews with migrant workers from Homestead, Florida.

Become A Marygrove Student!

Apply Now!