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Categories starting with P

Professional Development for Teachers (1)

Welcome to your future as a well-prepared, up-to-the-minute K-12 educator of the 21st century! Marygrove College has a nearly eighty-year history of training teachers. Marygrove-educated teachers can be found in public and private schools across the nation in classrooms and in leadership positions.
Professional Development for Teachers

Performing Arts and Theatre (3)

Are you multi-talented? Do you like to perform? A Performing Arts major or minor will assist you in developing your multi-faceted talents and in understanding all the dimensions of a career in the performing arts. It will also prepare you for more specialized study in graduate work.
Performing Arts and Theatre

Pharmacy Technology (3)

Marygrove College offers a one year, credit certificate that prepares students to become Pharmacy Technicians. This is a three consecutive semester program that begins in September and ends in August. Students who complete the program and pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam will be qualified to work in pharmacies across Michigan as licensed Pharmacy Technicians.
Pharmacy Technology

Philosophy (4)

Philosophy, the love of wisdom and learning, is basic to any balanced education. To study philosophy means to ask deep and important questions, to listen carefully to another’s perspective, to examine facts and reasons critically, and to seek truth without compromise.
Philosophy

Physics (2)

The physics courses at Marygrove serve two purposes. The courses provide a general introduction to physics, and they address specific applications. If you have a science major or minor, or you are preparing for a medical career or a career forensics, the college physics sequence will introduce you to physics using trigonometry as a base.
Physics

Political Science (5)

The Department of Political Science offers an undergraduate major and minor that provides you with a wide variety of career and educational choices after graduation. You may choose to enter the work world of public (governmental) service or the social institutions that are important to our community, state, and nation. Or you may desire to continue your education in law school or graduate studies. Along with your course work in political science you will take relevant liberal arts courses and obtain meaningful field experience.
Political Science

Pre-Law (1)

Attorneys have a variety of academic backgrounds-economics, English, history, philosophy and political science. Law schools do not designate a major program concentration as a prerequisite for admission. Law schools admit students who are broadly trained and who evidence analytical skills, good writing and oral communication abilities, as well as social awareness.
Pre-Law

Pre-Dental / Pre-Medical (1)

You need to carefully plan and monitor your college career- especially if you plan to apply to medical or dental school. Marygrove College has a pre-medical/pre-dental advisor to assist you in your planning.
Pre-Dental / Pre-Medical

Psychology (5)

Psychology is a discipline devoted to understanding the thought and behavior of people, and then channeling that knowledge into social and psychological services. The program at Marygrove offers a sequence of courses, which take you through the areas of psychological development, personality theory, socialization, learning, dysfunctional behavior and experimental psychology. The program is intended for day or night students. The psychology major prepares you to be an informed and engaged citizen in our ever-changing world with respect for diversity and social justice issues.
Psychology

Items starting with P

Professional Certification

18 Hour Planned Program - for Professional Certification

Select a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work from among Reading (RDG) courses and 6 credit hours of course work from Education (EDU) courses in consultation with the program coordinator.

*Select 12 credit hours from the following reading courses:
RDG 509 Psychology of Literacy Development
RDG 519 Language and Cognitive Development
RDG 559 Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction

*Select six credit hours from the following courses:
EDU 524 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 530 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 556 Language Development and Disorders
EDU 640 Technology Tools for Teachers

* Other courses may be substituted with permission of the program coordinator.

18 Hour Planned Program - for Professional Certification

Select a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work from among Reading (RDG) courses and 6 credit hours of course work from Education (EDU) courses in consultation with the program coordinator.

*Select 12 credit hours from the following reading courses:
RDG 509 Psychology of Literacy Development
RDG 519 Language and Cognitive Development
RDG 559 Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction

*Select six credit hours from the following courses:
EDU 524 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 530 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 556 Language Development and Disorders
EDU 640 Technology Tools for Teachers

* Other courses may be substituted with permission of the program coordinator.

Provisional Teacher Certification: Elementary

Certifiable Elementary Majors (30-40 hours) and Minors (20-26 hours) currently available:
Early Childhood Education – Group Minor
Dance – Major
English – Major & Minor
French – Minor
History – Major & Minor
Integrated Science – Group Major
Language Arts – Group Major & Group Minor
Mathematics – Major & Minor
Social Studies – Group Major & Group Minor
Spanish – Minor
Special Education – Learning Disabilities Major

General education requirements, professional education courses, and course work in the certifiable major and minor must be completed before student teaching. You must carefully adhere to the sequence of courses as listed below:

Required Professional Education Courses:
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 240 Developmental Psychology
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 344 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Mathematics
EDU 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12
EDU 354 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
EDU 364A * Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
EDU 364B * Methods in Elementary Reading: Practicum
EDU 374 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Science
EDU 475 Foundations in American Education
EDU 499 Student Teaching
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner

* Generally offered once per academic year. Students are to complete clock hours in the Education Technology Center and field-based experience as required in teacher certification courses.

Additional courses and requirements for admissions and completion may be required with changes in divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Certifiable Elementary Majors (30-40 hours) and Minors (20-26 hours) currently available:
Early Childhood Education – Group Minor
Dance – Major
English – Major & Minor
French – Minor
History – Major & Minor
Integrated Science – Group Major
Language Arts – Group Major & Group Minor
Mathematics – Major & Minor
Social Studies – Group Major & Group Minor
Spanish – Minor
Special Education – Learning Disabilities Major

General education requirements, professional education courses, and course work in the certifiable major and minor must be completed before student teaching. You must carefully adhere to the sequence of courses as listed below:

Required Professional Education Courses:
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 240 Developmental Psychology
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 344 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Mathematics
EDU 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12
EDU 354 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
EDU 364A * Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
EDU 364B * Methods in Elementary Reading: Practicum
EDU 374 * Methods for Teaching Elementary School Science
EDU 475 Foundations in American Education
EDU 499 Student Teaching
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner

* Generally offered once per academic year. Students are to complete clock hours in the Education Technology Center and field-based experience as required in teacher certification courses.

Additional courses and requirements for admissions and completion may be required with changes in divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Provisional Teacher Certification: Secondary

Certifiable Secondary Majors (30-40 hours) and Minors (20-26 hours) currently available:
Art Education – Comprehensive Group Major (no teaching minor required)
Biology – Major & Minor
Chemistry – Major & Minor
Computer Information Systems – Major & Minor
Dance – Major
Economics – Minor
English – Major & Minor
French – Minor
History – Major & Minor
Mathematics – Major & Minor
Music – Comprehensive Group Major
Political Science – Major & Minor
Social Studies – Group Major
Sociology – Minor
Spanish – Minor

Required Professional Education Courses:
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 343 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 347 * General Secondary Methods
EDU 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12
EDU 357 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner
MAJOR 347 * Methods course in major field (For appropriate methods course, see the program section in your major.)
EDU 475 Foundations in American Education
EDU 499 Student Teaching

* Generally offered once per academic year.

Additional courses and requirements for admission and completion may be required with changes in divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Certifiable Secondary Majors (30-40 hours) and Minors (20-26 hours) currently available:
Art Education – Comprehensive Group Major (no teaching minor required)
Biology – Major & Minor
Chemistry – Major & Minor
Computer Information Systems – Major & Minor
Dance – Major
Economics – Minor
English – Major & Minor
French – Minor
History – Major & Minor
Mathematics – Major & Minor
Music – Comprehensive Group Major
Political Science – Major & Minor
Social Studies – Group Major
Sociology – Minor
Spanish – Minor

Required Professional Education Courses:
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 343 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 347 * General Secondary Methods
EDU 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12
EDU 357 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner
MAJOR 347 * Methods course in major field (For appropriate methods course, see the program section in your major.)
EDU 475 Foundations in American Education
EDU 499 Student Teaching

* Generally offered once per academic year.

Additional courses and requirements for admission and completion may be required with changes in divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Philosophy Course Descriptions

PHL 126 Persons and Values 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisite: None; Offered every term.
This course is an introduction to philosophy by way of a critical examination of some classic problems that shape human experience, which may include issues concerning the nature of reality, human knowledge, the nature of the self, the nature of justice, and the nature of the good.

PHL 201 Western Philosophical Traditions I 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: LS 105 and ENG 107 (or their equivalents)
The history of western philosophy, from the pre-Socratics to Copernicus is covered in this class. Special attention is paid to the ways in which ancient Greek philosophy sets the stage for Medieval and Renaissance philosophy.

PHL 202 Western Philosophical Traditions II 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: LS 105 and ENG 107 (or their equivalents)
The second half of the western philosophy sequence covers the period extending from the Renaissance to the present. Special attention is paid to the mutual influence of emerging scientific thought and the philosophy of the periods covered.

PHL 225 Ethics 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: LS 105 and ENG 107 (or their equivalents); Offered every term
Normative moral philosophy is studied in this class through a survey of the major positions and thinkers in the western philosophical tradition of ethics.

PHL 228 Ethics in the Health Professions 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105 and ENG 107 (or their equivalents)
This is a survey of basic ethical considerations in contemporary issues in the health care professions. Case studies highlight the legal and moral aspects of patients’ rights, care of the newborn, quality of life, geriatric care and transplant surgery.

PHL 235 Philosophy and the City 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: LS 105 and ENG 107 (or their equivalents)
Philosophy was born, nurtured, and came of age in urban environments. From ancient Athens to contemporary Detroit, the tale of philosophy would be incomplete without an account of how cities have shaped philosophical thought, and how philosophical thought has influenced cities. In moral and political terms, the problems of philosophy have ever been city problems. In no other setting have problems of equality, justice, ethics, and identity formation been thrown into such sharp relief as in the world’s urban environments. This course will introduce students to philosophy through the lens of reflection about the nature and specific philosophical challenges of urban environments. Reciprocally, it will also introduce students to the practice of reflection about urban environments through the use of philosophical tools, concepts and methods.

PHL 276 Critical Thinking 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: LS 105‚ ENG 107 or equivalent.
Critical thinking is a foundational course in natural language reasoning skills. Topics range from understanding, clarifying and evaluating claims, to assessing sources of evidence, to being able to recognize common pitfalls in one’s own reasoning as well as in that of others. The representation, classification, analysis, and evaluation of arguments using a variety of techniques is also covered.

PHL 291 Independent Study 1-3 hours
Prerequisites: PHL 126 or 276, ENG 108 or equivalent, and LS 105, permission of instructor and by arrangement with the department.
This is a directed readings course, to consist of a focused study of a student-selected topic in consultation with instructor.

PHL 315 World Philosophical Traditions 3 hours
General Education option; Prerequisites: ENG 108; one of PHL 126, 276, or 225; one of HUM 150, RS 150, GEO 199, or HIS 255.
This course presents a focused discussion of one or more major philosophical traditions across the world’s cultures, from antiquity to the present. Areas covered may include India, East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the West.

PHL 325 Special Topics in Moral Philosophy 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 108, and any one of PHL 126, 210, or 276.
This course is a focused study of a single, significant moral issue in contemporary life. Topics will vary as they will be drawn from the contemporary context.

PHL 370 Social and Political Philosophy 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 108, and any one of PHL 126, 210, or 276. Writing intensive course.
This course comprises an in-depth study of both classic and contemporary problems in social and political philosophy, with emphasis on developing a comprehensive understanding of the concept of justice and of its application to contemporary issues. This course is cross-listed as POL 370.

PHL 382 Business and Professional Ethics 3 hours
Prerequisites: PHL 126‚ BUS 266‚ LS 105‚ ENG 108.
A descriptive survey of ethical theories and perspectives common to all professions is the subject of this course. Students will engage in reflection on contemporary ethical approaches through case studies and selected readings, and conduct analysis of some major dilemmas in business and other professions.

PHL 395 Directed Study 1-3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105, any one of PHL 126, 210, or 276, and permission of instructor by arrangement with the department.
This is a directed research course, to consist of a focused study of a student-selected topic in consultation with instructor. PHL 396 Philosophy of Religion 3 hours Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 108, and any one of PHL 126 or 276. Among the topics to be studied in this class are: the meaning of God and the logic of God-talk; arguments for and against the existence of God; the peculiarity of religious language; critical views of religion as myth and as worldview.

PHL 491 Independent Study 1-3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, and ENG 108, PHL 126, 210, or 276, normally at least 12 hours in philosophy, permission of the instructor by arrangement with the department.
This is an advanced research course focused on a student selected topic in consultation with instructor.

PHL 496 Senior Research Project 3-4 hours
Prerequisites: Philosophy major; by arrangement with the department; completion of 21 credit hours in philosophy, including all other major requirements.
This is the capstone course in the philosophy major. Students will study and generate independent and original work on a substantive philosophical issue, and formally present their findings to students and faculty in a departmental or interdepartmental setting.

Political Science Course Descriptions

POL 149 American Political Systems 3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisites: None; Term: 1, 2, 3
Description, analysis, and explanation of the American political process will be developed through the study of interest groups, political parties, the court, the Executive Branch, and Congress; the potential power and effectiveness of the individual and the responsiveness of the governmental system will be studied.

POL 201 Public Administration 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
Description, analysis, and application of the organizational dynamics of government. Emphasis will be placed on organizational behavior, the bureaucracy, public budgeting and finance, and personnel management.

POL 203 Political Reality and Public Policy 3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisites: ENG 108 recommended; Term: 1, 2
Systematic application of pertinent concepts and principles of political science to the public policy process. Examination of selected contemporary policy issues introduced in POL 149. A writing intensive course.

POL 210 Introduction to Leadership 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108 recommended
Examination of the basic general facets of leadership, from its definitions to the various approaches, theories, types, demographic influences, ethical concerns, and problems involved.

POL 300 Special Topics in Political Science 2-4 hours
Prerequisites: POL 149
Analysis of specific policies, institutions, and actors in domestic and international politics. Offered on a rotating basis according to special demands and needs of students.

POL 305 Introductory Statistics 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100 or equivalent; Term: 1‚ 2‚ summer
Fundamental principles of descriptive and inferential statistics with applications to social sciences. May include use of statistical software.

POL 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity 3 hours
Prerequisites: Introduction to Sociology or SOC 201; Term: 1, 2
Analysis of the social, economic, and political aspects of racial/ ethnic relations in the U.S. Effects of diversity on various racial and ethnic groups.

POL 308 Contemporary Indian Issues 3 hours
The course will look at issues affecting American Indians today; environmental, land, burial, sovereignty, and treaty rights issues will be analyzed and discussed.

POL 309 Ethnicity in Urban America 2 hours
Identifies and develops the concepts of urbanization and ethnicity within the context of American society as well as specific inter-group relations.

POL 310 Metro Detroit Through Three Centuries 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or 253 recommended. Fee: yes
The history of Detroit and its metropolitan area from 1701 to the present.

POL 315 Third World Politics 3 hours
Prerequisites: One course in political science or social science; Offered alternative years.
An analysis of 20th-century issues such as power and justice, elite and mass, the role of bureaucracy, and evolutionary and revolutionary change. Emphasis on Latin America, Middle East, Africa, and Southeast Asia.

POL 316 Liberalism, Communism and Fascism 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108‚ HIS 256 recommended
The intellectual, political, and social origins and development of modern ideologies.

POL 318 Global Women’s Issues and Policies 3 hours
Term: 2
A survey course on the political and social status of women around the world; the course will involve cross-cultural comparisons.

POL 319 Sovereignty and U.S. Public Policy 3 hours
The status of Native American sovereignty and self determination today; the impact of U.S. government on American Indians.

POL 320 African-American Politics 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108; Offered alternative years.
Historical and contemporary analysis of the origins, development, and currency of African-American politics, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Emphasis will be placed on the sociopolitical behavior of the black electorate as well as the roles and behaviors of black candidates and officeholders in the United States.

POL 325 American Foreign Policy 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108‚ introductory course in POL or HIS; Offered alternative years
Analysis and evaluation of the goals and instruments of U.S. foreign policy, primarily in the post-World War period.

POL 330 Michigan: History and Politics 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108‚ one previous course in social science; Term: 2; Offered alternate years
Development of sub-federal political institutions: states, counties, municipal corporations, school districts, and regional governments. Emphasizing the Michigan experience, the political system will be experienced within the framework of major historical eras, population patterns, and economic developments. A writing intensive course.

POL 331 The American Presidency 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, one previous course in social science; Offered alternate years
This course will examine the various components of the American presidency, from the background of candidates to the nomination process, election, performance and problems, relations with aides, the media, the states, their party, the opposition, personal influences, interest groups, the people, congress, the courts and the world.

POL 347 Methods of Teaching Political Science 2-3 hours
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher certification; permission of department and instructor
Introduction to the theories, goals, and techniques of teaching Political Science at the secondary level.

POL 355 Social Research 4 hours
Prerequisites: SOC 201 or 202, PSY 205; Pre/co-requisite: MTH 099, Term: 1, 2
Provides a beginning understanding and appreciation of social research. Emphasizes the use and production of research for improving one’s effectiveness as a social science professional. Students become familiar with different social research approaches, using both quantitative and qualitative data. Includes a series of experiential exercises that lead students step-by-step through the research process: deciding and developing a research question, specifying sampling strategy, selecting or developing appropriate measures, planning and carrying out data collection, analyzing data, and writing a research paper. Emphasizes important ethical and human diversity issues raised throughout the research process.

POL 358 Law and Society 3 hours
Prerequisite: Introductory course in political science or social science; Offered alternate years
A study of American law as seen through the United States Constitution and interpreted by the federal and state court systems. Also a brief examination of the roots of American civil and criminal law.

POL 359 History of Civil Rights 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108‚ HIS 253 recommended
This course focuses on one of the most crucial periods in American history: the Civil Rights Movement (1954-1970). Historical, political, social and religious aspects of the movement are examined in documentary material. The course considers events preceding and succeeding the Civil Rights Movement and discusses strategies to achieve social justice. The human effects of social change and the relationship between the black freedom movement and all Americans are explored.

POL 370 Social and Political Philosophy 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 108, and any one of PHL 126, 156, or 276.
Study of both classic and contemporary problems in social and political philosophy, with emphasis on developing a comprehensive understanding of the concept of justice and of its application to contemporary issues.

POL 377 Transnational Politics 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Introductory course in political science; Term: 2
Study and analysis of the foundations for world peace with justice. Exploration of alternative futures in several critical areas. Concepts include determinants of power in a multipolar world, transnational organizations, nationalism, anti-nationalism and intervention, new forces in world politics, arms control and disarmament. A writing intensive course.

POL 385 Community and Organizational Change 3 hours
Prerequisites: SOC 201 or ECN 202; Term: 1, 2
Analysis of communities and organizations as social systems,including examination of critical problems. Also examines intervention and change strategies that appear to be effective and how they can be applied. A service-learning component may be included.

POL 387 U.S., Chinese, Russian Relations 3 hours
Prerequisites: Introductory course in social science; Offered alternate years
Historic, cultural and geo-political determinants of U.S. positions on Chinese and Soviet foreign policy; the role of ideology; Soviet-American and Chinese-American relations; the role of the U.S., Soviet Union and China in the Third World.

POL 388 Cooperative Field Work Experience 2-6 hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval; Term: 1, 2, summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to area of specialization, planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting, and evaluating of experience will be required.

POL 395 Comparative Politics 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Introductory course in political science; Term: 1
Study of issues in comparative politics with analysis of contemporary political systems in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

POL 491 Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Term: 1, 2, summer
In-depth advanced research on student-selected topic in consultation with faculty.

POL 496 Senior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: senior standing; Political science major; must have completed 80 percent of General Education and major course requirements; ENG 312; major writing intensive course, IS 320A Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis recommended
In-depth research and writing on a political science topic related to Detroit.

POL 496S Social Science Senior Seminar: 3 hours
Political Science Concentration Prerequisites: Social Science or Social Studies major; senior standing or permission of instructor; ENG 312; writing intensive course in political science (POL 203, POL 377). IS 320A Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis or POL 330 Michigan History and Politics recommended
Senior research seminar for social science and social studies majors with political science and history concentrations. In-depth research and writing on a political science topic related to Detroit.

POL 498 Field Work 2-6 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; Term: 1, 2, summer
Practical application of theory and skills in a related urban work experience.

Psychology Course Descriptions

PSY 205                                             Introductory Psychology 4 hours
General Education requirement. Prerequisites: MTH 099,  LS 105, ENG 107; Term: 1, 2

An introduction to the study of psychology as a behavioral and social science. Theories, principles and empirical findings about human and animal behavior are examined. Topics include perception, motivation, learning, development, physiology, memory, social influence, psychological disorders and others. General Education option.

PSY 225                                             Methods in Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None; Term: 1

An introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline. This course teaches the student to distinguish between science and pseudoscience. It introduces the scientific method and research techniques, including correlation, experimental design, and statistical reasoning.

PSY 240                                             Developmental Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205; Term: 1, 2

Overview of human development and factors that influence it. Covers physical, intellectual, social and emotional development from infancy through adolescence. May include service learning.

PSY 288                                             Cooperative Field Experience 2-6 hours
Prerequisite: Department approval

Supervised work experience in psychology.

PSY 300                                             Modules in Psychology 1-3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205. Offered as needed.

Covers selected topics designed to fit special needs and interests in order to provide an opportunity to delve

more deeply into topics which cannot be adequately or fully treated in other courses.

PSY 301                                             Experimental Psychology 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108, PSY 205, PSY 225, PSY 305; Term 1

Significant aspects of experimental psychology, methods and techniques. Includes topics in memory, learning, and cognition. Laboratory included.

PSY 305                                             Introductory Statistics 4 hours
Prerequisite: MTH 100 or equivalent; Term:1, 2

Fundamental principles of descriptive and inferential statistics with applications to social sciences. May include use of statistical software.

PSY 320                                             Psychology of Women 3 hours
Recommended: PSY 205; Term: 1; alternate years

A review of the social construction of gender, including topics of cultural stereotyping, gender comparisons of social, cognitive, and personality characteristics, work discrimination, love relationships, societal mental health issues.

PSY 321                                             Introduction to Life-span Psychology 4 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205; Term: 1, 2

A survey of principal cognitive, social and behavioral  processes that operate across the lifespan. Intended for but not

limited to prenursing students. 

PSY 330                                             Psychology of Adjustment 3 hours
Recommended: PSY 205; Term: 1; Offered as needed

Processes involved in interaction of an individual with the environment. Includes study of theories of adjustment, stress and its effects, problems of adjustment through the life-span, techniques of adjustment, and maladaptive reactions.

PSY 340                                             Abnormal Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205; Term: 2, alternate years

Overview of the treatment and etiology of the major current diagnostic categories of psychopathology. Special attention to societal attitudes about mental illness. Online.

PSY 343                                             Adolescent Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108, PSY 205; Term: 2

Overview of physical, intellectual, social and emotional development from preadolescent through late-adolescent period. Topics include family and peer relationships, identity achievement, adjustment problems, and acceptance of the adult role.

PSY 346                                             Aging Individual in Society 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108, PSY 205; Term: 1, 2  

Later years of human life explored mainly from the perspective of developmental psychology. Includes biological and sociological aspects, as well as areas of problems.

PSY 348                                             Death and Dying 3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status; PSY 205; Term 1: alternate years

Discussion of death in our society and in different cultures, attitudes toward death, children & death, grief & bereavement, suicide, lethal behavior, search for immortality & other topics.

PSY 360                                             Social Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 099, ENG 312‚ PSY 205; PSY 225 recommended. Term: 2

Study of how behavior is affected by the social environment. Topics include the self, interpersonal attraction, aggression, prejudice, attitude change, power, altruism. Writing intensive.

PSY 365                                             Group Dynamics 3 hours
Prerequisite: LA 105, ENG 108, PSY 205; Term: 1

Group processes as they apply to task, community and organizational groups. Theories will be demonstrated by participating in dyads, small groups, and large groups in class. May include service learning.

PSY 388                                             Cooperative Field Experience  2-6 hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval

Supervised work experience in psychology.

PSY 390                                             Special Topics in Psychology 2-3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205. Offered as needed.

Various topics in psychology are offered on a rotating basis according to demand. May be elected for a maximum of six non-duplicate credit hours.

PSY 438                                             Psychology Practicum 2-3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, psychology major, permission of instructor

Practical application of classroom education and skills in a related field placement. Professionally supervised.

PSY 488                                             Cooperative Field Experience  2-6 hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval

Supervised work experience in psychology.

PSY 491                                             Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: PSY 205, junior or senior standing, departmental approval

For intensive advanced research with specified methodology and product.

PSY 496                                             Department Research: Senior Seminar  3  hours
Prerequisites: PSY 360, PSY 305, ENG 312‚ PSY 301, and permission of the instructor. Term: 1

Topic to be selected by student with approval of instructor. May be library research based or an original research project. Requires written and oral presentations. Writing intensive. 

 

Post-Degree Certificate in Business

The following courses are required for the Certificate of Completion in Business:

BUS 173  Introduction to Business
ACC 224 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 234  Principles of Accounting II
BUS 266  Principles of Organization and Management
BUS 302  Principles of Marketing
BUS 304  Business Law I

Fifteen hours must be taken at Marygrove College. Persons with special skills or needs may establish an individualized program upon consultation with and approval of the business department head. This certifi­cate may be earned while pursuing a second major or second degree.

Professional Certification

(18 hrs. beyond degree initial/provisional teaching certificate)
Teachers are eligible for Professional Certification after completion of three years of successful teaching and 18 hours of credit earned in a planned program following the date of issuance of the provisional certificate. Students in master’s degree pro-grams may apply the first 18 hours of their degree program toward this requirement. Non-degree students who wish to be recommended for Professional Certification by Marygrove must develop a plan of work (18 credit hours) with the Teacher Certification Officer. A maximum of 6 credit hours completed at another accredited college or university may be accepted as part of the 18-hour planned program.

All applications to the Michigan State Department of Education for a Professional Teaching Certificate must be made through the Teacher Certification Officer. It is the responsibility of the student to follow through on this matter.

(18 hrs. beyond degree initial/provisional teaching certificate)
Teachers are eligible for Professional Certification after completion of three years of successful teaching and 18 hours of credit earned in a planned program following the date of issuance of the provisional certificate. Students in master’s degree pro-grams may apply the first 18 hours of their degree program toward this requirement. Non-degree students who wish to be recommended for Professional Certification by Marygrove must develop a plan of work (18 credit hours) with the Teacher Certification Officer. A maximum of 6 credit hours completed at another accredited college or university may be accepted as part of the 18-hour planned program.

All applications to the Michigan State Department of Education for a Professional Teaching Certificate must be made through the Teacher Certification Officer. It is the responsibility of the student to follow through on this matter.

Pre-Dental / Pre-Medical Overview

GENERAL INFORMATION

You need to carefully plan and monitor your college career- especially if you plan to apply to medical or dental school. Marygrove College has a pre-medical/pre-dental advisor to assist you in your planning.

As a Marygrove student you will have opportunities to work closely with faculty members. This is important because their recommendations are part of the selection criteria used in the professional schools to which you will be applying.

The medical and dental schools in the United States recognize the desirability of a broad education. Therefore, it is suggested that you have some background in social sciences and humanities, as well as strong communication skills. Naturally, a solid foundation in the basic natural sciences is required.

While admissions’ requirements vary, generally the required sequence of core science and mathematics courses include:

  • one year of biology with lab
  • one year of physics with lab
  • one year of general chemistry with lab
  • one year of organic chemistry with lab
  • mathematics through one semester of calculus

You may choose any major offered at Marygrove. However, if you major in biology you will be better prepared for the requirements of medical and dental schools.

In addition to college course work, you will need to prepare to take the Medical College Aptitude Test (MCAT).

Pre-Law Overview

GENERAL INFORMATION

Attorneys have a variety of academic backgrounds-economics, English, history, philosophy and political science. Law schools do not designate a major program concentration as a prerequisite for admission. Law schools admit students who are broadly trained and who evidence analytical skills, good writing and oral communication abilities, as well as social awareness.

You can‚ therefore‚ prepare for law school by fulfilling the general education requirements at Marygrove College, and choosing from a variety of majors and minors.

Your academic major can help prepare you for law school. It can also provide you with training for an alternative career should you choose not to enter law school immediately after graduating from Marygrove College.

A pre-law counselor is available at Marygrove to assist you in planning your education and identifying professional opportunities. The counselor keeps abreast of trends in legal education and can assist you with law school ap­plication procedures, options for financial assistance‚ information on The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and career planning.

Performing Arts and Theatre Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Entertainment business • Talent management • Dance performance • Music performance and composition • Acting • Production technology • Communications

GENERAL INFORMATION
Are you multi-talented? Do you like to perform? A Performing Arts major or minor will assist you in developing your multifaceted talents and in understanding all the dimensions of a career in the performing arts. It will also prepare you for more specialized study in graduate work.

Performing Arts Major

The Bachelor of Arts/Performing Arts degree is an individualized, interdisciplinary major across three departments: dance, music, and theatre. It is also a collaborative venture between two institutions; Marygrove College and the University of Detroit Mercy. The performing arts major consists of 60 credits of combined coursework in dance, music and theatre. Because this is an interdisciplinary major, a minor is not required. A student selects one primary area of concentration with approximately 40 credits and two secondary areas to comprise an additional 20 credits.

An interested student will meet with the Chair of the Dance Department for an advisor to be assigned in the primary concentration. The advisor will work with the student and faculty from related disciplines to design the individual major. Acceptance into the Performing Arts programs is based on a formal audition in the primary area of concentration. The audition is held by members of the department faculty. Prospective students may not audition until they have completed the Admissions process, and have been accepted into Marygrove College’s academic program. Courses for this interdisciplinary major are listed in the catalog sections of Dance, Music, English and Performing Arts and in the University of Detroit Mercy catalog online at www.udmercy.edu

Performing Arts Minor

The minor provides an opportunity to experience the performing arts in a larger, collective sense. The performing arts group minor consists of 24 hours of coursework selected from the following areas: music, dance, English and theater. A Performing Arts minor may include up to 12 credits from The Theatre Department at University of Detroit Mercy.

Required Core (12 credit hours)
TRE 161 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr.
TRE 266 Production Technology 3 cr.
DAN 254 Movement for Actors & Singers 2 cr.
MUS 106A Voice Class I or private study 3 cr.

Electives to Complete Group Minor (12 credit hours)
Dance Electives:
DAN 180 Elementary Jazz 3 cr.
DAN 190 Elementary Tap 1 cr.
DAN 376 Intermediate/Advanced Tap 1 cr.
DAN 377 Intermediate/Advanced Jazz 1 cr.

Music Electives:
MUS 110 Private or Small Group Lessons: Beginning 1-3 cr.
MUS 111 Private Lessons: Intermediate 2-3 cr.
MUS 301 Lyric Theater 1 cr.

Theatre Electives:
TRE 132 (UDM 1320) Rehearsal/Productions 3 cr.
TRE 351 (UDM 3510) Acting Dynamics 3 cr.
TRE 355 (UDM 3550) Scene Study 3 cr.

PRIVATE LESSONS

The Department of Music offers private weekly instruction in piano, voice, organ, and guitar to majors, and non-majors under limited circumstances. Study of other instruments may be arranged with due notice.

All applied music, whether keyboard, vocal, or instrumental will develop technique, style, musicianship, memorization, interpretation, and repertoire appropriate to the medium. Specific technique and repertoire requirements for each proficiency level are available in the department. All music majors and minors enrolled in applied music courses are required to attend music department events as specified each semester.

Failure to meet the recital attendance requirements will result in the adjustment of the student’s applied music grade in his/ her applied area of concentration. Please see Music Department Handbook for recital attendance requirement guidelines. 

MUS 111 Private Lessons: Intermediate Level 2-3 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of department; Term: 1, 2, 3; Fee: yes

Course descriptions available from department.

MUS 120, 121, 122, 125 Private Lessons: Advanced Level I 2-3 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of department; Term: 1, 2, 3; Fee: yes
Course descriptions available from department.

MUS 220, 221, 222, 225 Private Lessons: Advanced Level II 2-3 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of department; Term: 1, 2, 3; Fee: yes
Course descriptions available from department.

MUS 320, 321, 322, 323 Private Lessons: Advanced Level III 2-4 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of department; Term: 1, 2, 3; Fee: yes
Course descriptions available from department.

MUS 420, 421, 422, 423 Private Lessons: Advanced Level IV 2-4 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of department; Term: 1, 2, 3; Fee: yes
Course descriptions available in department.

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Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove