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Categories starting with I

Institute of Music & Dance (4)

The Institute of Music & Dance (IMD) at Marygrove College is a school of the arts. It provides students of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds with high quality, developmentally appropriate programs in music, dance, theater, visual arts, and other performing arts disciplines. The purpose of the IMD is to nurture and harness creativity, strengthen technical and performance skills, and heighten artistic awareness.
Institute of Music & Dance

Institutes (41)

If your idea of learning is to dive right in and experience life firsthand, you'll love these innovative programs in math, science and the arts. Our specialized institutes harness highly experiential avenues of study. Students and teachers build knowledge and skill through a broad spectrum of experiences in mathematics, science, the arts, and a wealth of Detroit-area cultural opportunities.
Institutes

Detroit Studies (36), Institute of Music & Dance (4), Science & Math (1)

Integrated Science (3)

The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Integrated Science is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those candidates seeking certification to teach at the elementary- and/or middle school level. Requirements include 53 credit hours divided among biology, chemistry, earth science, space science, and integrated science.
Integrated Science

Interdisciplinary Studies (2)

The first-year seminar (IS 100: Liberal Arts Seminar) introduces students to college life through avenues of self-knowledge; knowledge of Marygrove’s history, mission and place within the broader framework of higher education. The Liberal Arts Seminar is a required course for newly enrolled first year students with less than 32 transfer credits pursuing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Students normally take this course during their first semester at the College.
Interdisciplinary Studies

International Studies (2)

This international studies program, coupled with second-language fluency in Arabic, French, or Spanish, is designed to prepare you with the ability to communicate effectively or conduct business in a multicultural and global environment in the US and abroad. As a student in this program, you will develop strong writing and speaking skills in more than one language; you will gain the necessary understanding for interacting and negotiating with a diverse workforce in fields such as sales, the airline and tourism industries, health care, counseling, human resources, communication and public relations, and legal advocacy; and you will be prepared to work within a broad range of industries, governmental agencies, multinational corporations, social organizations, and educational institutions.
International Studies

Items starting with I

Institute of Music & Dance Mission Statement

The Institute of Music & Dance (IMD) at Marygrove College is a school of the arts. It provides students of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds with high quality, developmentally appropriate programs in music, dance, theater, visual arts, and other performing arts disciplines. The purpose of the IMD is to nurture and harness creativity, strengthen technical and performance skills, and heighten artistic awareness.

Integrated Science Overview

CAREER INFORMATION
The Integrated Science Group Major is certifiable by the State of Michigan for K-8 teacher candidates. In order to be certified, students must complete this major, the elementary teaching minor, and the Teacher Education professional sequence. Some students may wish to pursue this program to gain an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences.

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Elementary School Teacher • Middle School Teacher • Science Curriculum Consultant • Science Journalist • Science Museum Staff

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Integrated Science is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those candidates seeking certification to teach at the elementary- and/or middle school level. Requirements include 44-45 credit hours spread across biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, engineering, and integrated science.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The Elementary Integrated Science Program at Marygrove College has been designed to strengthen science teaching in K-8 schools. The Elementary Integrated Science Program coursework emphasizes “the learning of science through investigation and inquiry”, as called for by the National Science Education Standards. The rationale of the new curriculum design is that our graduates will model their teaching based on how they were taught. The new sequence of courses will provide students with a broad science background as well as an in-depth understanding of effective and innovative practices in teaching science.

The courses and experiences in the Integrated Science program are organized to develop an understanding and appreciation of science structures, core concepts, ideas, values, facts, methods of inquiry, and uses of technology needed by today’s teachers. The curriculum is designed such that the candidate not only gains a broad base of content knowledge and laboratory skills in each of the major scientific disciplines, but also learns how to integrate content within the sciences as well as throughout non-science disciplines.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Program Scheduling
The B.S. in Integrated Science program is primarily a day program, although some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.

Transfer Student Information
The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines. However, major coursework older than 10 years, from time of admittance, will be transferred in as elective credit and may not be applied to the major. Students may petition to the department chair for the older credits to be applied towards the major.

Credit for Prior Learning
Learning derived from life experiences and from individual study is of significant academic value and can often be equated with college-level studies. Students may earn credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experience. Permission of the department chair is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 120 credit hours required for a degree.

Academic Performance Standard
Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Integrated Science major.

Computer Literacy Requirement
Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) must be achieved prior to graduation. Students’ computer literacy will be evaluated and assessed through the Junior and Senior seminar course sequence.

Writing Intensive Requirement
All science majors must take ISC 312: Junior Seminar as their writing intensive course.

Senior Seminar Requirement
Students must successfully complete ISC 496A and ISC 496B in order to graduate with a B.S. in Integrated Science.

Internship/Cooperative Education
It is strongly encouraged that students participate in a summer undergraduate research experience either with a Marygrove College faculty member, or by securing an off-campus internship or fellowship before they graduate. Students may receive elective credit for an internship through ISC 388, ISC 488, and/or ISC 491.

Awards
Students may be eligible to win the following departmental awards based on their scholarly work. The Natural Sciences Department Award is given to the outstanding graduating science major. Women in the sciences are also eligible for the Suzanne Fleming Scholarship. This scholarship is given to a woman who demonstrates financial need, potential in science and on their scholarly work.

Interdisciplinary Studies Overview

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR
The first-year seminar (IS 100: Liberal Arts Seminar) introduces students to college life through avenues of self-knowledge; knowledge of Marygrove’s history, mission and place within the broader framework of higher education. The Liberal Arts Seminar is a required course for newly enrolled firstyear students with less than 32 transfer credits pursuing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Students normally take this course during their first semester at the College.

UPPER-LEVEL SEMINARS
In the upper-level interdisciplinary seminars, you will examine a single topic from perspectives such as art, business, computer science, economics, natural science, philosophy, and psychology. The topic may vary from semester to semester. These seminars can fulfill one or more of the General Education requirements.

IS 320 Detroit Seminar
This course is an introduction to Detroit as an American city with particular emphasis on the interrelationship of various dimensions, such as economics, history, politics, and culture. The main objective is to use the city of Detroit as a laboratory to develop an understanding of the complexity of urban culture, life, and development.

IS 322 Technology Seminar
This course explores the development of technology in relationship to a variety of topics. The main objective is to give students an appreciation of how technology influences and is influenced by all facets of our lives.

IS 324 Social Justice Seminar
This course examines specific social justice issues as they relate to a variety of disciplines. The emphasis is on the critical thinking skills necessary for problem-solving and decision making in our complex society.

IS 326 Special Topics
This course will explore and analyze a specific topic chosen by instructors from at least two diverse disciplines. Each course will be unique in content and will emphasize the interrelationship among the disciplines represented by the faculty. These courses may include study abroad, service learning, or other field experiences.

Interdisciplinary Studies Course Descriptions

IS 100 Liberal Arts Seminar 3 hours
The Liberal Arts Seminar is designed for first-year students as an introduction to college life in general and to a Marygrove education in particular. Through exposure to various dimensions of the liberal arts and exposure to a number of social issues, students gain self-knowledge; academic and personal success skills; and an understanding of Marygrove’s history, mission and place within the broader framework of higher education. This course includes guest presentations, field trips and attendance at cultural events.

IS 100H Honors Liberal Arts Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Admission into Honors Program.
Through a liberal use of guest speakers, out of class activities and special readings, the students in this seminar will focus on leadership development and ways of knowing. The course will assist each participant in knowing themselves, knowing the College and its mission, knowing various approaches to the acquisition of knowledge within the disciplines and knowing how to make the most of their Marygrove experience. At the same time, opportunities will be created for the study and exercise of leadership.

IS 320A Detroit Seminar: Detroit and the 3 hours
Contemporary Urban Crisis Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
In this course, we apply ideas from economics and literature to the study of contemporary issues in Detroit. We pay particular attention to several key factors influencing the city’s present condition. These include: race and inequality, federal urban policy, corporate de-industrialization, economic globalization, and local and regional development. Seminar sessions consist of discussions involving all members of the class and presentations by individual faculty and students. In our discussions, we will respond to assigned readings based upon our own experiences of life in and around Detroit. Presentations will focus on specific topics which are the products of our research. The course will include guest presentations, films, and a tour of specific sites which are important to our discussions.

IS 322A Technology Seminar: Human Communication and Technological Change 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
This course will explore the co-evolution of communication and technology. Other technological benchmark events, such as language, domestication of animals, evolution of writing and weapons will be explored. A focus of this course is to understand the success and collapse of civilizations based on their adaptation to and use of various technologies.

IS 324B Social Justice Seminar: Global Women’s Issues 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
This course is an interdisciplinary study of women’s issues in the context of social justice. Personal reflection, social analysis, evaluation of cultural/religious values, and identification of action plans will provide the structure for examining issues related to women. While topic areas may change, some of the women’s issues to be explored are biological/personality influences on women’s roles, crosscultural variations in women’s status, and discrimination in politics and education.

IS 324C Social Justice Seminar: Environmental Policy 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
This course is intended as a simple, practical introduction to America’s environmental politics, policies, and regulations. It will explore basic environmental science concepts such as ecology, ecosystems, and pollution – which policy makers, regulators, organizations and citizens need to understand. It will answer questions such as: who develops the environmental regulations, what are examples of these regulations, are the regulations and politicians focusing on the most important priorities? How efficient are environmental policies, and can laws balance economic concerns with environmental protection? What are the environmental concerns in Michigan and the Metropolitan Detroit area?

IS 324D Social Justice Seminar: Government in Action 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
This course examines specific social justice issues as they relate to a variety of disciplines. The emphasis is on the critical thinking skills necessary for problem-solving and decisionmaking in our complex society. It is an interdisciplinary study of social policy combining classroom and fieldwork in the context of social justice. Students will learn to apply key components of public policy to state and local government forum settings.

IS 326AH Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar: Religion and Science 3 hours
Prerequisites: Honors students only, or permission of instructors; recommended: 1 natural science/lab course, 1 religious studies course, and basic computer literacy. Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.
This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on issues at the border between science and religion, with emphasis on the physical and life sciences rather than the social sciences. Such topics are often the most exciting place for new insights and discoveries; they also tend to illustrate the differences and similarities between religion and science. At these “frontiers” conflicts and contradictions also appear. We will examine a number of points of convergence and explore the various ways in which religious believers and scientific investigators approach these topics. We will seek to understand both past and current interactions between science and religion, and we will look for ways in which both religion and science contribute to our overall knowledge. At the same time, we will learn to better appreciate both the distinctiveness and the complementarities of these diverse ways of knowing.

IS 326B Travel Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status or permission of instructors.
The travel seminar is a study of a specific city, country or regional area and generally includes exposure to the geography, history, culture and achievements of the location. Each travel seminar considers the locale from a unique perspective, dependent upon the expertise of the involved faculty members. All seminars include travel outside the U.S. and some include a Service Learning component.

IS 326D The Arts and Civic Engagement 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status or permission of instructors.
This course looks at the role of the arts in social activism. The course will cover theory as well as practice across disciplines and themes. Students will be actively involved in a local community project.

IS 326G/GH Globalization in Context 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Honors students only, or permission of instructors; junior/senior status.
This course will explore the world phenomenon of globalization in order to better understand and participate in the profound and rapid changes that it generates. We will study globalization from a variety of perspectives – political, social, economic, cultural, environmental – and their interconnections. Does this globalizing process move towards increased diversity or homogeneity, towards inclusion or marginalization, towards global justice or injustice, towards enhanced democracy or uncontrolled market dominance? At the end of the course we will also explore how we can make globalization work.

IMD in the News!

IMD in the News!

Institute of Music and Dance tap students strut their stuff, under the direction of IMD faculty member Marnita Dickerson, at the Charles Wright Museum of African American History. (photo attached Allysa Dickerson, Cienna Boyce, Coda Boyce, Joshua Cooper and Kendall Crenshaw ). They also appeared on the Channel 7 ABC News!

Institute of Music and Dance tap students strut their stuff, under the direction of IMD faculty member Marnita Dickerson, at the Charles Wright Museum of African American History. (photo attached Allysa Dickerson, Cienna Boyce, Coda Boyce, Joshua Cooper and Kendall Crenshaw ). They also appeared on the Channel 7 ABC News!

International Studies Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Study Abroad Advisor • Bilingual Assistant • Business Manager • Court & School Mediator • Foreign Service Worker • Publications Manager • Public Relations Expert • Technical & Scientific Writer • Translator • Website Editor

GENERAL INFORMATION
This international studies program, coupled with second language fluency in Arabic, French, or Spanish, is designed to prepare you with the ability to communicate effectively or conduct business in a multicultural and global environment in the US and abroad. As a student in this program, you will develop strong writing and speaking skills in more than one language; you will gain the necessary understanding for interacting and negotiating with a diverse workforce in fields such as sales, the airline and tourism industries, health care, counseling, human resources, communication and public relations, and legal advocacy; and you will be prepared to work within a broad range of industries, governmental agencies, multinational corporations, social organizations, and educational institutions.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
This degree is offered as a collaborative effort by the Departments of English and Modern Languages, Business, Humanities, Political Science, Sociology, and History. Requirements include core content courses, language courses, and one of two concentrations, not to exceed a total of 72 semester hours, in addition to general education credits.

CAREER INFORMATION
Here are some of the reasons why you might like to include language study as a part of your professional training.

Arabic
Arabic, which is used by approximately 200 million speakers in 24 Middle Eastern, North African, and Sub-Saharan African countries, is the fifth most spoken language in the world and is quickly becoming one of the most important international languages for business and international relations. Although Arabic is also widely spoken in some parts of the United States, there is a recognized shortage of trained speakers of Arabic in North America.

French
French competes with English and Spanish as a leading “international” language and remains an important tool for anyone who plans to go into international business or law. French is spoken not only in France, but also by millions of people in 34 other nations around the world in Europe, North America, the Caribbean, and Africa.

Spanish
Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world – and in the U.S. The ability to speak Spanish is a skill applicable to a wide range of careers, both at the domestic and international levels, including law, business, and international trade.

This interdisciplinary degree will prepare you for a wide range of professions. For example, you may seek careers as translators, bilingual assistants, customer service representatives, multinational marketers, international entrepreneurs, business managers, publications managers, web site editors, foreign service workers, coordinators of multicultural recruitment, diversity trainers, court and school mediators, agency or foundation administrators, and public relations experts.

This degree can also lead to a variety of graduate fields of studies, for example, International Business, Business Management, Educational Leadership, Human Resources, Professional Communication, Translation, International Studies, Area Studies, Cultural Studies, Intercultural Communication, Cross-Cultural Studies, and Community Counseling.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
The Translation Certificate Program
While pursuing the bachelor’s degree with the Translation Concentration, you can earn a Translation Certificate if you complete each translation course in the five-course sequence with a grade of B or better.

First-hand Language Experience
You will find that you will get the most out of your language program if you take every opportunity to speak Arabic, French, or Spanish and to immerse yourself in Arabic-, French-, or Spanish-speaking cultures.

A short study abroad experience is one of the core requirements for the major. In addition, Marygrove offers semester and summer abroad programs, and credits from these programs can apply to the major with prior approval. Work and volunteer abroad opportunities, summer jobs, and work/study placements can also put you in touch with Arabic, French, and Spanish-speaking people. You might consider part-time jobs with businesses that have Arabic, French, or Spanish international operations.

Prior Language Experience
If you can demonstrate near-native proficiency in French or Spanish (after taking a language proficiency exam, administered by the Modern Languages Program Director), Marygrove will waive FRE/SPA 151, 250, and 251 for you. In addition, you may substitute three other courses for the required 300-level courses in French or Spanish. You can either take other 300-level French or Spanish courses or take courses in a second foreign language at the 151 level or higher; you can also take three additional Humanities or English classes.

If you can demonstrate near-native proficiency in Arabic or another modern language, you will satisfy the language requirement by taking three classes in a second language at the 151 level or higher, or three additional English writing classes. You can receive up to 12 hours of modern language credit through the Advanced Placement and CLEP programs (after taking a language proficiency exam, administered by the Modern Languages Program Director), or you may transfer college credit in Spanish, French, Arabic, or other modern languages not offered at Marygrove.

Integrated Science Course Descriptions

ISC 210 Integrated Science I 4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundational courses; Term Fall Fee: yes. General Education option.
ISC 210 is a course which, together with ISC 211, is designed to give students a broad experience in the natural sciences and help students develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature of science, the evolution of science, how we use science, the role of science in society, and the prospects for science in the future. This course emphasizes the physical science and its interrelatedness to other areas of science. Elementary education and general education students are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

ISC 211 Integrated Science II 4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundational courses; Term Winter Fee: yes. General Education option.
ISC 211 is a course which, together with ISC 210, is designed to give students a broad experience in the natural sciences and help students develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature of science, the evolution of science, how we use science, the role of science in society, and the prospects for science in the future. This course emphasizes the life science, earth science, and their interrelatedness to other areas of science. Elementary education and general education students are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

ISC 222 Introduction to Engineering 3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100; ENG 108, or permission of the instructor
This course introduces the engineering profession, its disciplines, professional concepts, as well as the ethical and professional responsibility. An overview of problem solving and the engineering design process with the utilization of various computer applications are covered. Engineering communication skills will be emphasized and utilized in the course. The class highlights the latest issues facing engineers and introduces the most advanced concepts and practices that are required to engineer for sustainability. The interconnection between engineering and sustainability will be discussed by examining the impact of engineering decision on society, business, and the environment. Sustainable design methodology as well as sustainable energy systems and infrastructure will be addressed. The course is suitable for students pursuing science, engineering, education, or business degrees.

ISC 312 Junior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter
Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS. Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work. In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports. The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one. A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity. This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 388 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, Integrated Science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ISC 410 Special Topics 3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior status in the major; Term: TBA
Selected topics and issues in science and/or science education as chosen by the instructor.

ISC 488 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, Integrated Science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ISC 491 Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; Integrated Science major; Junior status; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 496A Science Senior Seminar: Library Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major; completion of general education and writing requirements; Term: Fall, Winter
This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project. Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B. Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B Science Senior Seminar: 2 hours
Laboratory Research Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member. The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

Institute of Science and Math Education

Progam Contact
Dr. Sally Welch
LA Bldg., Rm 301
8425 W. McNichols
Detroit, MI 48221
Phone: 313.927.1319
Email:swelch@marygrove.edu
 

How does the Institute of Science and Mathematics Education help teachers teach science?
1. Prepare Effective K-12 Science Teachers

Goal: Prepare K-12 teacher education candidates in the content and practice of science as well as the principles and best practices of imaginative science education. This goal will be met by implementing several American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recommendations regarding the preparation of prospective science teachers.

AAAS recommends that undergraduate teacher education programs be restructured to better prepare candidates in subject matter content and in pedagogical practice, and that college classrooms and laboratories should themselves be models of innovative teaching strategies

Mastery of science content must be ensured
That teachers should have command of the subject matter they teach may seem a statement of the obvious, but the percent of higher education institutions requiring students to take at least one course in the natural sciences dropped from 70 percent in 1964 to 34 percent in 1993. Colleges and universities with a lab science general education requirement dropped from 79 percent in 1964 to 30 percent in 1993. The absence of serious attention to science literacy at the college level is compounded by the fact that most science and mathematics in the elementary grades is taught by generalists who majored in elementary education and who were not exposed to all four natural science areas (physics, biology, chemistry, and geology).

The implications are clear in terms of the quality of science education in many self-contained classrooms. If a child is convinced that the seasons change because of Earth’s changing distance from the sun, it requires excellent knowledge of science and how science is learned to help a child understand the complex and often counterintuitive scientific principles that explain phenomena. At the very least, it is crucial that all science teachers are literate enough in science to address their students’ personal conceptions of scientific phenomena.

Intensive study of a science discipline increases the likelihood that future teachers will be able to understand science at a deep conceptual level and to reflect on important ideas, theories, and applications. AAAS and an increasing number of school districts strongly recommend that prospective science teachers — middle as well as high school — major in science. 

Progam Contact
Dr. Sally Welch
LA Bldg., Rm 301
8425 W. McNichols
Detroit, MI 48221
Phone: 313.927.1319
Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

How does the Institute of Science and Mathematics Education help teachers teach science?
1. Prepare Effective K-12 Science Teachers

Goal: Prepare K-12 teacher education candidates in the content and practice of science as well as the principles and best practices of imaginative science education. This goal will be met by implementing several American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recommendations regarding the preparation of prospective science teachers.

AAAS recommends that undergraduate teacher education programs be restructured to better prepare candidates in subject matter content and in pedagogical practice, and that college classrooms and laboratories should themselves be models of innovative teaching strategies

Mastery of science content must be ensured
That teachers should have command of the subject matter they teach may seem a statement of the obvious, but the percent of higher education institutions requiring students to take at least one course in the natural sciences dropped from 70 percent in 1964 to 34 percent in 1993. Colleges and universities with a lab science general education requirement dropped from 79 percent in 1964 to 30 percent in 1993. The absence of serious attention to science literacy at the college level is compounded by the fact that most science and mathematics in the elementary grades is taught by generalists who majored in elementary education and who were not exposed to all four natural science areas (physics, biology, chemistry, and geology).

The implications are clear in terms of the quality of science education in many self-contained classrooms. If a child is convinced that the seasons change because of Earth’s changing distance from the sun, it requires excellent knowledge of science and how science is learned to help a child understand the complex and often counterintuitive scientific principles that explain phenomena. At the very least, it is crucial that all science teachers are literate enough in science to address their students’ personal conceptions of scientific phenomena.

Intensive study of a science discipline increases the likelihood that future teachers will be able to understand science at a deep conceptual level and to reflect on important ideas, theories, and applications. AAAS and an increasing number of school districts strongly recommend that prospective science teachers — middle as well as high school — major in science.

Prospective students must be engaged in discussions about teaching and learning
AAAS also recommends that science-teacher education programs engage students in discussions about substantive issues of teaching and learning closely connected with the everyday work of teaching.

  • This work should occur throughout the teacher education program, should take place in K-12 schools where the best science teaching practice is in place, and should not be postponed until a student is in a full-time student teaching assignment.
  • In addition to the assumptions, purposes, and discourse of science, teacher education programs should expose their students to other cultural belief systems and to discussions of controversies about the nature of science.
  • Teacher education programs should make it possible for teachers to study approaches to developing and legitimizing knowledge, learning what counts as a good idea, and what evidence can be used to decide what constitutes meaningful knowledge.
  • Teacher education programs should actively recruit potential teachers from among those majoring in science.

Field experiences must be built into the curricula
To connect prospective science teachers to the everyday work of teaching and the everyday work of science, AAAS recommends that teacher education programs build field experiences into the curricula.

  • First-hand experiences in schools, teaching and mentoring experiences, and fieldwork with scientists should come early in the teacher education program. Most prospective teachers rarely witness the extraordinary efforts teachers must undertake to educate themselves in their subject matter; to develop effective strategies for cultivating attitudes, skills, and knowledge of science in students; and to assess the success of their teaching and their students’ learning.
  • Field experiences that allow experienced teachers to share the full picture of teaching with novices make these “hidden acts” of teaching more visible to prospective teachers. By creating and supporting professional collaborations, teacher educators can give prospective science teachers a foundation for building habits of reflective teaching.

College professors must model effective teaching
Science majors and prospective teachers can gain a head start in building dispositions, skills, and knowledge appropriate to science education if they have had undergraduate science professors who embrace the Project Kaleidoscope model of “what works” for faculty and curricula. PKAL urges college faculty to illustrate the relationships between science, mathematics, technology, and society in their curricula and to allow students to become active learners who have first-hand experience making connections between their own ideas and the knowledge they develop in courses.

As colleges increase the number of science courses that encourage inquiry-based, research-rich, hands-on learning, they increase the likelihood that future teachers and scientists will experience the excitement and satisfaction of “doing science as scientists do science.”

Addressing AAAS recommendations at Marygrove
Marygrove science and education faculty will work collaboratively to address AAAS recommendations and to strengthen the preparation of K-12 science teachers.

A first action strategy will be to design interdisciplinary, general education science courses appropriate for prospective teachers and non-science majors.

In particular, faculty will examine approaches that have proved successful at Kansas State University, an institution committed to involving their science departments in the education of teachers, and at Hope College, well known for its strong science programs at the undergraduate level.

One approach makes use of large data sets that are available on a variety of Web sites.
In a course designed for high school teachers at KSU, faculty filtered various astronomical, biological, environmental, and atmospheric data into data sets that were representative and that students could work with. Science faculty further developed tools that made the process of data analysis transparent to students, so that they could learn what these sophisticated processes were doing from a hands-on approach. Using computational and visualization research, the faculty developed lessons for a course in Visual Quantum Mechanics that were appropriate both for undergraduate science education majors and non-science students.

The quantum physics content ranged from discoveries early in the 20th century to contemporary applications such as medical diagnosis. During the semester students learned the basic science behind modern devices that use quantum physics in their design, and they studied the research that led to these devices. Pre-service teachers who were trained with these materials could use them in their classrooms to teach students how the abstract ideas of quantum physics were related to contemporary applications. Thus, the teachers and their students understood and even participated in modern physics research, even though they do not have the mathematical preparation traditionally required.

A second approach is to create informal or “tabletop” experiments that students can carry to their classrooms. Experiments begin with activities that teach the basic science and then allow students to use their imaginations to create new and interesting experiments. The course provides sophisticated science that does not need sophisticated equipment.

For example, a genetics course at KSU focused on the effect of radiation on the life cycle of yeast cells. Because the energy in ultraviolet light is sufficient to cause genetic damage to these cells, experiments could be performed without the need for extremely high-energy radiation. Further, yeast is a robust organism that can be maintained and grown without sophisticated equipment of special handling techniques. This course for pre-service teachers developed at KSU is now a commercial product available to teachers across the country.

Marygrove will also examine the applicability to teacher preparation of newly developed general education courses for non-science majors at Hope College. Faculty at Hope designed a set of novel interdisciplinary science courses named GEMS (General Education in Mathematics and Science) that use research-rich instruction in both lecture and laboratory. Two that would immediately seem to mesh with Marygrove’s curriculum are Edible Botany (environmental science and biology) and The Biology of Bread-Making (biology and biochemistry). As with the Kansas State courses, the Hope College approach could be tailored to the needs of Marygrove pre-service teachers, non-science majors, or science majors exploring an interest in teaching.

A second action strategy is to establish partnerships linking Marygrove to K-12 science and mathematics education. In 2001, the National Science Foundation funded a two-year program to explore solutions to the shortage of qualified science and math teachers in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Titled Teaching Scholar Partnerships (TSP), the program promotes the importance of best practices in teaching and learning, in accordance with national standards in K-12 science and mathematics education.

TSP objective are to:

  • Enrich and strengthen the learning experience of K-12 students in mathematics and science
  • Encourage undergraduate students in science, technology, and mathematics to consider K-12 math and science teaching as a career option
  • Generate national attention on the critical contributions that collaborative K-16 partnerships make to ensure the vitality of local schools

Teaching Scholar Partnership colleges collaborate with their local K-12 schools to introduce undergraduates, called Teaching Scholars, to K-12 classroom teaching. They learn to develop and implement lessons based on national standards, and to incorporate inquiry-based teaching methods and technology. Reflection and critical analysis are key components of local TSP projects.

Sample Teaching Scholar Partnership
The TSP program at Saginaw’s Delta College holds particular promise for adaptation at Marygrove, insofar as its purpose is to increase the participation, academic achievement, and retention of under-represented populations in science. With the advice of an advisory board that is actively involved in all aspects of TSP planning and implementation, the project focuses on middle and high school students but also provides professional development to middle and high school science teachers.

Delta teacher scholars work from 6-15 hours per week with teacher mentors in the science classrooms of two middle schools and one high school. College faculty mentors supplement the middle and high school classroom experience in weekly workshop meetings with teaching scholars. The workshops focus on teaching methods and delivery, classroom management techniques, laboratory safety, and instructional goals, objectives, outcomes, and assessment. With guidance from their mentors, the teaching scholars develop and implement inquiry-based labs to improve student understanding of the scientific method as well as specific content areas.

Assessments to date indicate that the program model strengthens learning at all levels by making purposeful connections between campuses and the K-12 community.

In addition to the National Science Foundation, Project Kaleidoscope provides excellent practical advice for building a TSP Project. To strengthen Marygrove’s capacity to prepare K-12 science teachers, Marygrove faculty, particularly Dr. Jeanne Andreoli, a PKAL-designated Faculty for the 21st Century, will work with PKAL Senior Associates to explore such a program at Marygrove.

2) Strengthen Continuing Professional Education for Science Teachers

 Goal: Strengthen the corps of Detroit Public School and Archdiocese of Detroit math and science teachers through continuing professional education activities in the newly established Marygrove College Institute for Science and Math Education.

This goal will be met by expanding and formalizing current workshops for in-service teachers within a new Marygrove College Institute for Science and Math Education.

Background
In 2001, through an Urban Initiative grant from the National Science Foundation to Detroit Public Schools (DPS), Marygrove College collaborated with the Detroit Zoo, the Cranbrook Institute of Science, and the New Detroit Science Center to offer workshops in “informal” (table top) science to DPS elementary school teachers. The goal of the workshop was to impact student learning via

  • New pedagogical approaches for teachers
  • Teaching materials that connect students to real life situations and problems
  • Methods for better preparation for MEAP testing
  • Strategies for increasing student retention of scientific information.

Elementary teachers spent two full days at Marygrove learning the pedagogy behind inquiry-based learning as well as designing new activities for use in their classrooms. On the following three days, under the direction of staff from Cranbrook, the Detroit Zoo, and the Science Center, teachers ventured to each partner site to learn how to use their locations for inquiry-based learning. At the same time, teachers became familiar with hands-on activities that they could take back to their classrooms.

In summer 2003, Marygrove introduced a new intensive workshop for high school chemistry teachers. The workshop allowed teachers to experience and design case studies and problem-based learning activities.

Teacher interest in these programs coupled with the State Department of Education’s push toward content preparation and the Department’s newly mandated “planned programs” of study in order to renew certification has prompted Marygrove to establish the Institute for Science and Mathematics Education.

Features of the Institute for Science and Mathematics Education
The new Institute for Science and Math Education will initially focus on the professional development of new and in-service teachers, recognizing that pre-service education is not long enough or intense enough for teachers to master all the skill areas they need, and that seasoned teachers must continually “re-master” their subject and how best to teach it.

The purpose of the Institute is to improve K-12 students’ achievement in math and science by building the capacity of their teachers.

The Institute will serve high school and middle school teachers from Detroit Public Schools, Archdiocese of Detroit Schools, and interested charter schools and school systems in Southeast Michigan, through extended multi-week workshops and/or continuing education or graduate courses. These learning formats will emphasize the scientific process and scientific content as well as innovative teaching techniques.

Marygrove’s teaching scientists will provide the appropriate background in basic science and research techniques and will offer multiple pedagogical approaches and exposure to new science methodologies and content areas. Teachers, in turn, will develop resource materials that can be utilized in their local school context.

In addition to continuing and expanding the week-long intensive workshops in informal science, the Institute will gradually develop a variety of courses and workshops on such topics as disease, environmental testing, nutrition, DNA mapping, fraction/decimal/metric systems, geometric sketching, graphic calculators, teaching to national and Michigan Curriculum Framework standards rather than to tests, and other topics as appropriate.

In summer 2005 the Institute will offer interdisciplinary teacher workshops in biotechnology and forensic science, two topics that have appeal, real-world application, and connection to students’ lives (at least via the popular CSI series). Biotechnology has application to the food students eat, their families’ or culture’s medical anthropology, and medical treatments they might receive from a doctor. The “Marygrove CSI” course will focus on the basic science needed to investigate a murder case.

Future growth of the Institute
As it evolves, the Institute for Science and Math Education will develop sequenced workshops and curricula in the four natural science areas for middle and high school teachers; offer graduate courses in science education; organize local and national conferences on the teaching of science; and provide research opportunities for local teachers and visiting scholars.

3) Capture the Scientific Imagination of Kids

Goal: Capture the scientific imaginations and increase the science and math literacy of metro Detroit children and youth through workshops, summer camps, and weekend classes in the Marygrove College Kids’ College offered through ISME.

This goal will be met by offering a variety of hands-on, content-rich, active-learning experiences for elementary, middle, and high school students.

Recent research indicates that science enrichment activities are a major motivating force for African-American students’ decisions to enroll in science courses and to pursue science careers.

The Marygrove Kids’ College draws a majority African-American population, students whose parents are committed to strengthening their talents and addressing their academic weaknesses through enrichment and tutoring activities.

Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove