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Categories starting with E

Educational Leadership (1)

A Master of Arts in Educational Leadership will provide students with advanced knowledge and skills in managing and leading the modern school. This program focuses on the principal as the instructional leader and the chief architect of change in the school. In addition to a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of administrative and management theory and capacity building, students will be introduced to the concept of the principal as change agent. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring organizational development, assessment, change skills and identifying and working with the issues facing the urban school administrator.
Educational Leadership

Educational Technology (1)

Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The technology revolution has touched all aspects of teaching and administration in today’s schools. As a result educators—teachers, professionals, and administrators alike—must keep up with changes and make choices among an ever expanding array of technology resources.
Educational Technology

Educational Leadership (1)

A Master of Arts in Educational Leadership will provide students with advanced knowledge and skills in managing and leading the modern school. This program focuses on the principal as the instructional leader and the chief architect of change in the school. In addition to a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of administrative and management theory and capacity building, students will be introduced to the concept of the principal as change agent. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring organizational development, assessment, change skills and identifying and working with the issues facing the urban school administrator.
Educational Leadership

Educational Technology (1)

Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The technology revolution has touched all aspects of teaching and administration in today’s schools. As a result educators—teachers, professionals, and administrators alike—must keep up with changes and make choices among an ever expanding array of technology resources.
Educational Technology

English, Graduate (2)

The Master of Arts in English is designed to provide both theoretical and practical foundations for teaching English in community colleges or high schools. It is a 33-credit-hour program whose courses are offered in the evening and on weekends. Two required core courses will give a solid base for graduate English studies, while two 600-level advanced seminars will offer rigorous opportunities to explore various disciplinary topics in depth. The flexibly conceived Masters Project will provide an opportunity for students to further explore their topic of interest in literary works or in teaching composition.
English, Graduate

Early Childhood Education (14)

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) minor is done in conjunction with the Teacher Certification Program, along with a major leading to Elementary Level teacher certification (Language Arts, Integrated Science, Math, or Social Studies). The successful graduate will qualify for the endorsement in Early Childhood Education being added to an Elementary Level (K-8) teaching certificate. This added endorsement recognizes the graduate as a specialist for Kindergarten and primary level teaching in elementary schools.
Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education - Student Resources (2), Early Childhood Education - Specific Information (4)

Economics (3)

The Department of Economics offers courses to meet general education requirements and to serve business majors, students who major in different disciplines in the social sciences, and economics minors.
Economics

Education (4)

The Education Unit, in cooperation with other academic units, prepares students for teaching at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. Entrance into the College does not guarantee admission to the Teacher Certification (TCCERT) Program. Students must make a separate application to the Teacher Certification Program. Prior to admission to the TCCERT program, undergraduates will be assigned an advisor who will assist in planning the sequence of certification courses. Students must have a certifiable major and minor and adhere to the certification requirements as listed below in order to obtain teacher certification.
Education

English, Undergraduate (6)

You will be interested in an English major if you want a career in teaching, journalism, law, or business. A major in English will help you become an accomplished writer and critical thinker with skills valued and needed in many professions.
English, Undergraduate

Environmental Studies (3)

The Environmental Science Department has three major objectives: (1) to provide a strong environmental science major within a liberal arts framework for those entering environment-related jobs in industry or the government or preparing for graduate work; (2) to provide cognate backgrounds in environmental science for science educators and others who may require this major; (3) to provide non-science majors with sufficient background to understand advances in technology, environmental implications of new laws and health advances.
Environmental Studies

Ethnic / Cultural Studies (6)

Marygrove College offers minors in Ethnic/Cultural Studies and African-American Studies and certificates in African-American Studies and Women’s Studies designed to foster inter-ethnic understanding and to provide a sound basis for educating students and interested others on the activities, contributions, and impact of African-Americans, Native-Americans, Asians, Arabs, Latinos, and Women on the Americas. This is essential in preparing students for a complex world, given the growing importance of diversity in the workplace and in society at large. The two minors and two certificate programs, though multi-disciplinary in nature, are offered through the Social Science Department.
Ethnic / Cultural Studies

Items starting with E

Educational Technology

Educational Technology

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Marygrove College, in partnership with Lawrence Technological University, now provides educators a means to improve their teaching skills. At the same time, they improve learning for their K-12 students through the use of educational technology. Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The M.Ed. program comprises 30 credit hours of graduate study in practice-oriented courses covering all aspects of integrating technology into the classroom. Upon completion of the 21 core credit hours, certified teachers can obtain their NP endorsement. This endorsement is valid with or without the master’s degree. Courses are generally scheduled in the evenings and are offered online.

The Educational Technology programs are designed to develop knowledge and skills in using the computer to enhance teaching, applying emerging technologies to the creation of educational media, participating in decision making about adopting educational technology applications, making presentations to various audiences using appropriate technologies and training and coaching others in the application of technology.

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English Minor

The requirements for an English minor are 23 credit hours (with at least 9 credit hours at the 300 and 400 level), including:

1. General English Minor
ENG 160 Introduction to Literature
ENG 260 Approaches to Literary Studies
ENG 314 Literary Theory and Criticism

Four courses from the following:

ENG 203 Literature: The Short Story
ENG 206 Introduction to Poetry
ENG 222 Introduction to African-American Literature
                  -OR-
ENG 322 Studies in African-American Literature
ENG 241 History of the Drama
ENG 275 Introduction to Classical Literature and Mythology
ENG 301 British Writers I
ENG 302 British Writers II
ENG 310 American Literature I
ENG 311 American Literature II
ENG 317 The English Language: History, Structure, and Grammar
ENG 320 Selected Writers
ENG 321 Modern Poetry
ENG 331 Contemporary Drama
ENG 333 Detroit in Literature
ENG 350 World Literature
ENG 351 Shakespeare
ENG 361 Shakespeare on Film
ENG 352 The Novel
ENG 353 Contemporary Literature of Africa
ENG 370 Literature by Women

2. English Minor for Teaching
ENG 160 Introduction to Literature
ENG 205 Children’s Literature
ENG 260 Approaches to Literary Studies
ENG 317 The English Language: History, Structure, and Grammar

Four courses from the following:

ENG 203 Literature: The Short Story
ENG 206 Introduction to Poetry
ENG 222 Introduction to African-American Literature
                -OR-
ENG 322 Studies in African-American Literature
ENG 241 History of the Drama
ENG 275 Introduction to Classical Literature and Mythology
ENG 301 British Writers I
ENG 302 British Writers II
ENG 310 American Literature I
ENG 311 American Literature II
ENG 320 Selected Writers
ENG 321 Modern Poetry
ENG 331 Contemporary Drama
ENG 333 Detroit in Literature
ENG 350 World Literature
ENG 351 Shakespeare
ENG 352 The Novel
ENG 353 Contemporary Literature of Africa
ENG 361 Shakespeare on Film
ENG 370 Literature by Women

Other English courses approved by your academic advisor. Please see additional requirements, including ENG 348, Teaching Writing and Speaking, in the EDUCATION section of this catalog.

Early Childhood Education - FAQ's

Q. I have a bachelor's degree but not in the field of education. Can I earn my Teacher's Certification?
A. For initial certification at Marygrove, all elementary teachers are required to have a major in a discipline appropriate for teaching. All secondary teachers must have both a major and a minor in a teaching field. Each teacher preparation college is approved to certify teachers in specific disciplines. If you do not have a major and/or minor in a teaching area, you would need to complete the courses needed for that purpose. Apply to the certification program that interests you, in order to have a plan of work completed.

Q. I am already teaching as an uncertified teacher in a private or charter school. Can I earn my teaching certificate without giving up my position?
A. Once you have completed a "certifiable major" for elementary or a "certifiable major and minor" for secondary level and you have the bachelors degree completed with a 2.7 or better GPA, you can begin taking the education sequence of courses while you are teaching; you will attend late afternoon/early evening, or weekend courses. When the time comes, if your school and position are approved for student teaching, you may be able to complete student teaching in an "on-the-job" arrangement.

Q. How can I complete my courses for certification if I am working in the daytime?
A. Marygrove College offers teacher certification courses in the evenings and on weekends, in different program configurations. In general, these courses are provided to "cohort" groups. Once you begin the sequence with your cohort group, it is essential that you stay on track with that cohort group in order to be assured that the classes will be available when you need them.

Q. How long will it take for me to earn my teaching certificate?
A. After meeting the entrance requirements for a graduate program, you must complete six-to-seven semesters of professional teaching courses to complete both initial certification and the master's degree. Undergraduate/Post-degree students complete the requirements for a degree and/or certification based on the number of courses taken each semester. The professional teaching sequence does not include the time it may take to complete pre-requisites.

Q. I am already a certified teacher and I want to earn a master's degree. How long will this take me?
A. The most popular program for certified teachers at Marygrove is the Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) program. Students can complete this 30-credit program with a Study Team in five semesters. This program is available in a distance-learning format and in a weekend cohort group format on-site at six different locations in Michigan. Either mode of delivery will be a five-semester program.

A master's degree is also offered in Educational Leadership and Reading. These two masters' level programs usually take a minimum of six semesters.

Q. Do I need to take the GRE or another exam before I can be accepted into a graduate level program at Marygrove?
A. The GRE is not required at Marygrove. However, for teacher certification candidates the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification [MTTC] must be passed. All students entering a teacher certification program are required to take the MTTC Basic Skills test and pass all three areas of Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. This test must be passed within the first two semesters or the student is required to sit out until it is passed. Before student teaching, elementary candidates must pass the MTTC Elementary Education test and the MTTC test in their major. Secondary candidates must pass the MTTC in both the major and minor before they are permitted to student teach. Additional information is available at www.mttc.nesinc.com.

Q. Do the professors in the Education Department have experience working in K-12 schools?
A. Many of the professors in Marygrove's Education Unit transitioned to higher education from a career in K-12 public education. Also, some of the courses are taught by adjunct faculty members who are currently working full-time in K-12 public school settings. A balance is maintained between the instructors who are deeply rooted in the theoretical base necessary for building strong foundations for teacher preparation and those who have the actual classroom experiences that inform the theory with practice for application.

Q. Whom would I contact about scholarships or financial aid?
A. Information on financial aid is available on our Marygrove Web site - www.marygrove.edu. Candidates begin by obtaining the Federal Aid form and completing this over the Internet. Initially candidates also complete information specific to Marygrove. Successful candidates follow through on their applications leaving nothing to chance. Planning ahead is essential for candidates who must depend on financial aid. Undergraduate students generally have more options for financial aid than graduate level students. For eligible candidates who are full-time employees of Catholic schools there are other opportunities for help through the office of the education unit. Call 313-927-1459 for a Catholic School Scholarship application. The Michigan Tuition Grant, Sanford Loans, and Perkins Loans tend to be the sources most students investigate.

Q. How can I ensure that all of my teaching certification requirements are met?
A. At Marygrove every student in teacher certification, both undergraduate and graduate, will have an advisor. The advisor will work closely with the director of student teaching and with the teacher certification officer to check that each candidate is meeting the requirements for the major, minor, MTTC tests, student teaching mandates, and course requirements. It is, nonetheless, the responsibility of each candidate to meet with the assigned advisor to review his or her own file for completion. Posted deadline dates for applying for student teaching, for taking MTTC examinations, and for applying for graduation audit must be met in order that the candidate achieve his/her goal.

Q. Do I have to have a certain GPA to enter the education programs at Marygrove?
A. At the undergraduate level, all teacher certification candidates must maintain a GPA of 2.7 in order to enter the Education Unit as a teacher certification candidate. No methods courses may be taken until the student has applied to the unit and been interviewed and approved by the unit. The 2.7 must be met in order to receive this interview.


Q. I have a bachelor's degree but not in the field of education. Can I earn my Teacher's Certification?
A. For initial certification at Marygrove, all elementary teachers are required to have a major in a discipline appropriate for teaching. All secondary teachers must have both a major and a minor in a teaching field. Each teacher preparation college is approved to certify teachers in specific disciplines. If you do not have a major and/or minor in a teaching area, you would need to complete the courses needed for that purpose. Apply to the certification program that interests you, in order to have a plan of work completed.

Q. I am already teaching as an uncertified teacher in a private or charter school. Can I earn my teaching certificate without giving up my position?
A. Once you have completed a "certifiable major" for elementary or a "certifiable major and minor" for secondary level and you have the bachelors degree completed with a 2.7 or better GPA, you can begin taking the education sequence of courses while you are teaching; you will attend late afternoon/early evening, or weekend courses. When the time comes, if your school and position are approved for student teaching, you may be able to complete student teaching in an "on-the-job" arrangement.

Q. How can I complete my courses for certification if I am working in the daytime?
A. Marygrove College offers teacher certification courses in the evenings and on weekends, in different program configurations. In general, these courses are provided to "cohort" groups. Once you begin the sequence with your cohort group, it is essential that you stay on track with that cohort group in order to be assured that the classes will be available when you need them.

Q. How long will it take for me to earn my teaching certificate?
A. After meeting the entrance requirements for a graduate program, you must complete six-to-seven semesters of professional teaching courses to complete both initial certification and the master's degree. Undergraduate/Post-degree students complete the requirements for a degree and/or certification based on the number of courses taken each semester. The professional teaching sequence does not include the time it may take to complete pre-requisites.

Q. I am already a certified teacher and I want to earn a master's degree. How long will this take me?
A. The most popular program for certified teachers at Marygrove is the Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) program. Students can complete this 30-credit program with a Study Team in five semesters. This program is available in a distance-learning format and in a weekend cohort group format on-site at six different locations in Michigan. Either mode of delivery will be a five-semester program.

A master's degree is also offered in Educational Leadership and Reading. These two masters' level programs usually take a minimum of six semesters.

Q. Do I need to take the GRE or another exam before I can be accepted into a graduate level program at Marygrove?
A. The GRE is not required at Marygrove. However, for teacher certification candidates the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification [MTTC] must be passed. All students entering a teacher certification program are required to take the MTTC Basic Skills test and pass all three areas of Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. This test must be passed within the first two semesters or the student is required to sit out until it is passed. Before student teaching, elementary candidates must pass the MTTC Elementary Education test and the MTTC test in their major. Secondary candidates must pass the MTTC in both the major and minor before they are permitted to student teach. Additional information is available at www.mttc.nesinc.com.

Q. Do the professors in the Education Department have experience working in K-12 schools?
A. Many of the professors in Marygrove's Education Unit transitioned to higher education from a career in K-12 public education. Also, some of the courses are taught by adjunct faculty members who are currently working full-time in K-12 public school settings. A balance is maintained between the instructors who are deeply rooted in the theoretical base necessary for building strong foundations for teacher preparation and those who have the actual classroom experiences that inform the theory with practice for application.

Q. Whom would I contact about scholarships or financial aid?
A. Information on financial aid is available on our Marygrove Web site - www.marygrove.edu. Candidates begin by obtaining the Federal Aid form and completing this over the Internet. Initially candidates also complete information specific to Marygrove. Successful candidates follow through on their applications leaving nothing to chance. Planning ahead is essential for candidates who must depend on financial aid. Undergraduate students generally have more options for financial aid than graduate level students. For eligible candidates who are full-time employees of Catholic schools there are other opportunities for help through the office of the education unit. Call 313-927-1459 for a Catholic School Scholarship application. The Michigan Tuition Grant, Sanford Loans, and Perkins Loans tend to be the sources most students investigate.

Q. How can I ensure that all of my teaching certification requirements are met?
A. At Marygrove every student in teacher certification, both undergraduate and graduate, will have an advisor. The advisor will work closely with the director of student teaching and with the teacher certification officer to check that each candidate is meeting the requirements for the major, minor, MTTC tests, student teaching mandates, and course requirements. It is, nonetheless, the responsibility of each candidate to meet with the assigned advisor to review his or her own file for completion. Posted deadline dates for applying for student teaching, for taking MTTC examinations, and for applying for graduation audit must be met in order that the candidate achieve his/her goal.

Q. Do I have to have a certain GPA to enter the education programs at Marygrove?
A. At the undergraduate level, all teacher certification candidates must maintain a GPA of 2.7 in order to enter the Education Unit as a teacher certification candidate. No methods courses may be taken until the student has applied to the unit and been interviewed and approved by the unit. The 2.7 must be met in order to receive this interview.


English Course Descriptions

Please note: Semesters and years given below are subject to change.

ENG 107 Introduction to Writing 4 hours
Prerequisite: Placement recommendation. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
Concentration on the concepts of focus, organization, and development of expository writing. Introduction to research skills and writing, and the use of technology in composition. One additional weekly period of tutoring is required. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

ENG 108 Academic Writing 4 hours
Prerequisite: Placement recommendation. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Summer 16, Fall 16, Winter 17, Summer 17
Concentration on developing students’ abilities to produce analytical academic writing. Special attention to developing research skills and strategies. Students will be engaged in reading and discussing texts and writing within complex rhetorical situations. Students will work on a variety of types of written assignments ranging from short writing activities to fully-developed essays. Individual tutorial sessions will supplement class work. Students will learn to use technology as an aid to writing. Students must receive a final grade of at least C or retake the course. Credits from this course are not counted toward the English major.

ENG 160 Introduction to Literature 3 hours
General Education requirement. Fee: yes. Fall 15; Winter 16, Summer 16, Fall 16, Winter 17, Summer 17
Study and discussion of a variety of literary forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, with emphasis on critical analysis.

ENG 203 Literature: The Short Story 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Term varies.
Study and discussion of the themes and techniques of the short story.

ENG 205 Children’s Literature 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
Interpretive and critical study of literature for children and adolescents. Historical and categorical survey of children’s books, stressing significance in classroom and home.

ENG 206 Introduction to Poetry 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Term varies.
Introduction to the skills required to read poetry, and to a variety of poets and poetic forms.

ENG 207 Introduction to Mass Media 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Winter 16
Exploration and critical analysis of the nature and effects of mass media as a cultural phenomenon that has revolutionized our world. The course will focus on the key technological developments that have changed the way we communicate and understand our world from the telegraph to the Internet.

ENG 209 Fundamentals of Speech 3 hours
Term varies
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic communication skills in public speaking, and to improve his or her ability to communicate effectively.

ENG 222 Introduction to African-American Literature 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, student must have completed any LS requirement. Fall 15, Fall 16
Study and discussion of works by important writers of the African-American literary tradition. Interrelation of cultural‚ social‚ and historical influences.

ENG 241 History of the Drama 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 15
Study of major playwrights of the western world; em­phasis on human self-expression through drama.

ENG 260 Approaches to Literary Studies 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, ENG 160. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
Introduction to the discipline of literary study for students majoring and minoring in English and language arts. The course emphasizes writing about literature and critical strategies and information resources. This is a writing intensive course which should be taken before English 314 and at least two semesters before English 496.

ENG 264 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fall 15
Introduction to the principles and practices of writing poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will develop their skills as writers of imaginative literature by becoming conscious of craft, becoming effective critics of each other’s works, and improving their abilities to judge quality writing.

ENG 275 Introduction to Classical Literature and Mythology 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fall 16
A survey of canonical mythological works of Classical Greece and Rome. The course covers a variety of genres: epic and lyric poetry, comedic and tragic theatre with the intention of giving students a firm grounding in the stories that undergird much of western culture from literature and philosophy to the sciences and psychology.

ENG 290 Introduction to Film 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Term varies.
Introduction to the history and theory of film as an art form. The course will consider the historical development of film as well as the major narrative, technical, and cultural elements of cinema.

ENG 301 British Literature I 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Fall 16
Survey of British writers from medieval times to the eighteenth century, includeing such authors as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Pope.

ENG 302 British Literature II 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Fall 15
Survey of British writers from the Romantic period to the present, including such authors as Eliot, Dickens, Browning, Hardy, Joyce, Pinter, Lawrence, Lessing, and Woolf.

ENG 303 Contemporary Studies: The Movies 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Term varies
A study of major American films. Course includes such classic films as Citizen Kane, Casablanca, The Maltese Falcon, and current films.

ENG 304 Religion in Film 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 16, Winter 17
Examines film in the context of religion, and contextualizes religion in the medium of film. The course engages with selected films and the ethical, political, historiographical, and spiritual issues raised in them.

ENG 306 From Novel to Film 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature or film course and ENG 108. Term varies.
Examination of novels and their film versions, including such novels as Tess of the D’Urbervilles, A Passage to India, A Clockwork Orange, and The Color Purple.

ENG 308 Business and Professional Writing 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108 and several courses in the student’s major field. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Fall 16
Underlying principles and techniques for effective communications in business and professional settings. Emphasis on audience analysis, purpose, and organization of various types of letters, reports, and memoranda.

ENG 310 American Literature I 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 17
Survey of American writers of the early period, including such authors as Bradstreet, Dickinson, Douglass,
Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman.

ENG 311 American Literature II 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 16
Survey of American writers of the later period, including such authors as Ellison, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hurston, Morrison, Stevens, and Wharton.

ENG 312 Advanced Written and Oral Communications 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108 and at least two courses in student’s major. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Summer 16, Fall 16, Winter 17, Summer 17
Focus on writing and speaking situations in the student’s major field. Special attention is given to increasing sophistication in style, organization, development, and research strategies. Credits from this general education requirement are not counted toward the English major.

ENG 313 Journalism 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Term varies
Fundamentals of news gathering, writing, editing, and layout.

ENG 314 Literary Theory and Criticism 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, ENG 260, and at least two literature courses. Fee: yes. Winter 16, Winter 17
Study of the major trends in contemporary literary theory. Course also provides for practical experience with current methods and assumptions guiding the analysis and interpretation of literary texts.

ENG 317 The English Language: History, Structure, and Grammar 3 hours
Required for secondary teacher certification. Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Fall 16
Study of the development of the English language over time. Topics include language origin and history, phonetics, word structure, syntax, dialects, language in social interaction, grammar and usage.

ENG 319 Writing Creative Nonfiction 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Fall 16
Instruction in the techniques of writing varieties of nonfiction beyond the traditional academic essay.

ENG 320 Selected Writers 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 16, Winter 17
In-depth study of each year’s Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series guest author. May be taken more than once for credit with different authors.

ENG 321 Modern Poetry 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Term varies.
Study of major modern English language poets, such as Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Moore, Eliot, Hughes, Bishop, Hayden, Lowell, Levine, Merwin, Plath, and Dove.

ENG 322 Studies in African-American Literature 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 16, Winter 17
In-depth study of authors‚ periods‚ genres‚ or topics as chosen by the instructor. Students will do presentations and papers on specific individual writers‚ periods‚ genres‚ and/or themes‚ techniques‚ or works.

ENG 324 Selected Topics 3 hours
Prerequisites: At least three literature courses or permission of instructor and ENG 108. Term varies.
In-depth study of major authors, periods, or topics as chosen by the instructor. May be taken more than once for credit with different subjects.

ENG 325  Writing Features and Articles 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, ENG 313. Term varies.
Workshop study of feature writing and the business of feature writing that extends basic principles of journalism to features and articles.

ENG 328 Intercultural Communications 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Term varies
Study of intercultural communications that examines the relationships of language and culture, the development of dominant value systems, normative behavior of groups and individuals within groups, and the common barriers to intercultural understanding: ethnocentricity, stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.

ENG 331 Contemporary Drama 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course (preferably ENG 241) and ENG 108. Term varies.
Studies in drama from the 1950s to the present.

ENG 333 Detroit in Literature 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Term varies.
Examination of representations of Detroit in fiction, poetry, and other artistic media produced between 1940 and the present.

ENG 347 Methods of Teaching English 3 hours
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher certification; permission of department and instructor. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
Introduction to the theories, goals, and techniques of teaching English at the secondary level. Unit planning, learning assessment, skill building in composition and literature, simulations in lesson presentation. Appropriate field-based experiences.

ENG 348 Teaching Writing and Speaking 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108. Elementary focus in Fall, Secondary focus in Winter. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
An introduction to Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) theories and practices of teaching written and oral literacies at the elementary and secondary levels.

ENG 350 World Literature 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Fall 15
Survey of works of world literature in translation. This may include works of Asian, African, Caribbean, European, and South American writers.

ENG 351 Shakespeare 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 16
Study of selected plays from the major genres of Shakespeare’s dramatic writing (comedy, tragedy, history, and romance).

ENG 352 The Novel 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Term varies.
Study of the development of and major themes in the genre of the novel, including such novels as Frankenstein, Great Expectations, To the Lighthouse, and Midnight’s Children.

ENG 353 Contemporary Literature of Africa 3 hours
Prequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Term varies
Study and discussion of contemporary African literature. This may include works of Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiongo, Ama Ata Aidoo, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, and Nuruddin Farah.

ENG 361 Shakespeare on Film 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Winter 17
Study of film interpretations and adaptations of Shakespeare’s major works such as Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, and The Tempest.

ENG 362 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 264. Winter 17
Advanced instruction in the writing of poetry. Writing workshop with student conferences. Students take part in public presentation/publication of their work.

ENG 363 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108, ENG 264. Winter 16
Advanced instruction in the techniques of short story and longer fiction writing. Writing workshop with student conferences. Students take part in public presentation/publication of their work.

ENG 370 Literature by Women 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Fall 16
Study of both the establishment of and resistance to traditions in literature by women. The course seeks to grapple with definitions of feminism and what might constitute feminist literature.

ENG 388 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisite: Department approval. Fall 15, Winter 16, Summer 16, Fall 16, Winter 17, Summer 17
Supervised work experience in an activity related to English or language arts. May be taken more than once for credit.

ENG 415 Writing Online 3 hours
Prerequisites: One literature course and ENG 108. Term varies.
Workshop study of online writing. Students will extend their understanding of new media as they master the online principles of non-linearity, hypertextuality, and layering that differentiate online media from print.

ENG 491 Independent Study 3 hours
Prerequisites: At least three literature courses, permission of instructor, and ENG 108. Fall 15, Winter 16, Summer 16, Fall 16, Winter 17, Summer 17
Independent in-depth study of particular authors, periods, genres, or issues. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

ENG 496 Senior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: English or Language Arts majors only‚ ENG 260, ENG 312‚ ENG 314‚ 24-33 hours in the major including three literature courses at the 300 level. Fee: yes. Fall 15, Winter 16, Fall 16, Winter 17
In-depth critical reading, research, and analysis of a specific theme, genre, or single author. An extensive written research project and an oral presentation are required.

Environmental Science Course Descriptions

ENV 135   Earth Science  4 hours
Prerequisite: LS 105; MTH 099 Term Fall (odd). Fee: yes. General Education option.
Physical and chemical processes related to the past, present and future behavior of the Earth system and the energy systems that drive these processes. The course will focus on the Earth’s materials, the Earth’s surface and the Earth’s interior. Laboratory included.

ENV 201   Ecology and the Environment 4 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107, MTH 099; Term Fall (even), Summer (odd). Fee: yes. General Education option. Cross-listed with BIO 201
This course is a survey of the basic scientific concepts underlying ecology and an examination of how humans interact with, depend upon, and affect natural resources and ecosystems. Special attention will be paid to the magnitude and scope of global and local environmental problems, with a focus on measures that can be taken by individuals and communities to address those problems. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills and use of the scientific method. Laboratory included.

ENV 300 Weather and Climate 2 hours
Prerequisite: ENV 135; Term TBA. Fee: yes.
This course will orient you to the fundamentals of weather and climate. The course seeks to answer questions such as: Why is there weather in the first place? What drives the movement of air and water around the globe? How do the climates of various places differ, and what factors drive these differences? Why do the great majority of the world’s peoples live near the coasts? How might the climate be changing, and what factors might be driving these changes? Various aspects of meteorology will be discussed, including solar radiation, global circulation, winds, stability, precipitation processes, weather systems, and severe weather. Basic physical principles behind the weather, terminology, and weather analysis will be explored.

ENV 320   Introduction to Environmental Sustainability 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; ENV 201,  Term: TBA
This course introduces students to the dynamics between the influences of social, economical and environmental factors important in any analysis of environmental sustainability. The course will examine both historical and current perspectives of sustainability and the challenges in creating a balance between development and the environment.

ENV 350   Environmental Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241; CHM 325; Term: Fall (even). Cross-listed with CHM 350
Introduces students to environmental chemistry, the branch of chemistry dealing with the origins, transport, reactions, effects and fates of chemical species in the water, air, soil and living environments.

ENV 370   Environmental Policy and Regulations 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Term: Varies. Cross-listed with IS 324C
This course is intended as a simple, practical introduction into America’s environmental politics, policies and regulations. It will answer questions such as: who governs the environmental regulations, what are examples of these regulations, are the regulations and politicians focusing on the most important priorities? What are the environmental concerns in Michigan and the Metropolitan Detroit Area?

ENV 388   Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ENV 410   Special Topics in Environmental Studies: Urban Issues 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENV 320 Term: TBA.
Advanced study of urban environmental problems ranging from health, crime, pollution and policy.

ENV 488   Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ENV 491 Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; science major or minor; Junior status; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

Elementary and Secondary Teaching Certification

Any student with a history major who plans to teach at the secondary level is required to take the following coursework. These additional requirements are designed to meet the State of Michigan certification code and will prepare students to effectively teach the K-12 Content Standards for Social Studies in Michigan’s Curriculum Framework.

A. The Social Science General Education Requirements
POL 149 American Political Systems
ECN 200 Introduction to Macroeconomics
                  -OR-
ECN 203 Introduction to Microeconomics    

B. Additional Coursework
HIS 330 Michigan History and Politics

One of the following multicultural courses:

POL 306 Racial and Ethnic Diversity
                 -OR-
IS 320A Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis

C. Certification Requirements

HIS 347 Methods of Secondary Social Studies is required for secondary education.

Professional Education courses are found in the EDUCATION section of the catalog.

A grade of C (2.0) or better must be maintained in all courses of this major. An overall GPA of 2.7 is required to enter the Teacher Certification Program at Marygrove. See Teacher Certification section of this catalog for more information.

D. MTTC and Gateway Courses
Students are required to take the State-mandated Basic Skills Test and the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) in history. Students may not register for MTTC in history until they have successfully completed 80 percent of the major coursework and a gateway course. The gateway course is designed to help students prepare for the MTTC and to determine their readiness to take the test. Please consult the department for the current list of history gateway courses.

E. Certifiable Minor
See the EDUCATION section of the catalog for certifiable minors.

EDU 568 Teacher as Leader

This course provides an overview and examination of the foundational knowledge, current practices, and research related to teachers as leaders. The course addresses application and practices that develop competencies and behaviors that teachers need to become teacher leaders. Participants become reflective practitioners as they study the current state of education and many of the leading reform efforts. They learn and apply leadership strategies in their classrooms and communities. Participants explore theories as they may relate to the forces reshaping their schools. Topics such as organizational models, characteristics of leadership, change systems, vision development, and school design may be investigated. Participants set personal goals outlining ways they can create lasting change within the education profession through strengthening their instructional practice and commitment to student learning and achievement.

EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students

This course focuses on planning and organizing for meeting the differentiation needs of students in the mixed ability classroom. It takes seriously that students have different means for acquiring information, processing information, and developing products to show what they have learned. Participants study the differentiating instruction model of lesson content, the processes used in lessons, and the products of lessons within the context of students’ learning preferences, readiness, and interests. Course participants apply differentiation strategies in their classrooms to strengthen their instructional practices and commitment to meeting the diverse learning needs of their students.

 

EDU 570 Instructional Design

This course establishes a comprehensive way for teachers to engage in unit planning and instructional design. Participants integrate assessment into their planning and crate a sequence of learning experiences that logically and meaningfully help students meet required learning goals. In addition, participants align their instructional design to state and local standards.

EDU 618 Effective Assessment

This course begins with the basics of classroom assessment, then goes on to discuss the principles behind using assessment to differentiate instruction.  Participants create a variety of assessments to evaluate different types of student work and inform teacher’s instructional practices to improve student learning.

EDU 501 Teacher as Researcher

This course provides the opportunity for teachers to: reflect on and assess their teaching; explore and test new ideas, methods and materials; assess the effectiveness of the new approaches; share feedback with others; and make decisions about which new approaches to include in their classroom practices. Participants complete an individual research project aimed at a particular problem specific to their classroom situation that addresses student achievement. Next, participants engage in action research, data analysis and creation and implementation of a plan of intervention based upon their research findings.

This course provides the opportunity for teachers to: reflect on and assess their teaching; explore and test new ideas, methods and materials; assess the effectiveness of the new approaches; share feedback with others; and make decisions about which new approaches to include in their classroom practices. Participants complete an individual research project aimed at a particular problem specific to their classroom situation that addresses student achievement. Next, participants engage in action research, data analysis and creation and implementation of a plan of intervention based upon their research findings. 

COURSE OUTCOMES 

Participants will be able to: 

• Examine the theoretical foundations of action research and develop an action research plan 

• Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques 

• Analyze and interpret data according to proven processes 

• Share and critique action research projects 

EDU 5604 Evidence-Based Interventions

This course is designed to help the classroom teacher develop methods to assess students who are not succeeding and identify, implement and assess interventions to help those students. This course also builds upon content introduced in EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students to prepare participants to assess effects of instruction on student performance. Emphasis is placed on theories and practical concepts related to differentiation of instruction and assessment in order to meet the needs of a wide range of learners, including those in special education. Response to Intervention (RTI) will be discussed in terms of structuring individual, small group and whole group instruction.

This course is designed to help the classroom teacher develop methods to assess students who are not succeeding and identify, implement and assess interventions to help those students. This course also builds upon content introduced in EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students to prepare participants to assess effects of instruction on student performance. Emphasis is placed on theories and practical concepts related to differentiation of instruction and assessment in order to meet the needs of a wide range of learners, including those in special education. Response to Intervention (RTI) will be discussed in terms of structuring individual, small group and whole group instruction. 

COURSE OUTCOMES 

Participants will be able to: 

• Explain the importance of Evidence-Based Interventions (EBI) and describe the major components of an EBI program 

• Examine the relationship between EBI and RTI and describe the legal issues involved in implementing an evidence based intervention program 

• Describe and use a variety of school-wide, proactive, academic and behavior interventions with an individual student 

• Report findings in a child study report 

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Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove