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Categories starting with P

Professional Development for Teachers (1)

Welcome to your future as a well-prepared, up-to-the-minute K-12 educator of the 21st century! Marygrove College has a nearly eighty-year history of training teachers. Marygrove-educated teachers can be found in public and private schools across the nation in classrooms and in leadership positions.
Professional Development for Teachers

Performing Arts and Theatre (3)

Are you multi-talented? Do you like to perform? A Performing Arts major or minor will assist you in developing your multi-faceted talents and in understanding all the dimensions of a career in the performing arts. It will also prepare you for more specialized study in graduate work.
Performing Arts and Theatre

Pharmacy Technology (3)

Marygrove College offers a one year, credit certificate that prepares students to become Pharmacy Technicians. This is a three consecutive semester program that begins in September and ends in August. Students who complete the program and pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam will be qualified to work in pharmacies across Michigan as licensed Pharmacy Technicians.
Pharmacy Technology

Philosophy (4)

Philosophy, the love of wisdom and learning, is basic to any balanced education. To study philosophy means to ask deep and important questions, to listen carefully to another’s perspective, to examine facts and reasons critically, and to seek truth without compromise.
Philosophy

Physics (2)

The physics courses at Marygrove serve two purposes. The courses provide a general introduction to physics, and they address specific applications. If you have a science major or minor, or you are preparing for a medical career or a career forensics, the college physics sequence will introduce you to physics using trigonometry as a base.
Physics

Political Science (5)

The Department of Political Science offers an undergraduate major and minor that provides you with a wide variety of career and educational choices after graduation. You may choose to enter the work world of public (governmental) service or the social institutions that are important to our community, state, and nation. Or you may desire to continue your education in law school or graduate studies. Along with your course work in political science you will take relevant liberal arts courses and obtain meaningful field experience.
Political Science

Pre-Law (1)

Attorneys have a variety of academic backgrounds-economics, English, history, philosophy and political science. Law schools do not designate a major program concentration as a prerequisite for admission. Law schools admit students who are broadly trained and who evidence analytical skills, good writing and oral communication abilities, as well as social awareness.
Pre-Law

Pre-Dental / Pre-Medical (1)

You need to carefully plan and monitor your college career- especially if you plan to apply to medical or dental school. Marygrove College has a pre-medical/pre-dental advisor to assist you in your planning.
Pre-Dental / Pre-Medical

Psychology (5)

Psychology is a discipline devoted to understanding the thought and behavior of people, and then channeling that knowledge into social and psychological services. The program at Marygrove offers a sequence of courses, which take you through the areas of psychological development, personality theory, socialization, learning, dysfunctional behavior and experimental psychology. The program is intended for day or night students. The psychology major prepares you to be an informed and engaged citizen in our ever-changing world with respect for diversity and social justice issues.
Psychology

Items starting with P

Philosophy Overview

CAREER INFORMATION
Philosophy provides an excellent foundation for any profession. This is because the study of philosophy enhances one’s analytical abilities, one’s intellectual independence, one’s ability to openly and honestly engage the ideas of others, one’s abilities to write and to think critically and carefully about complex problems that defy easy solution, and one’s abilities to express oneself with clarity and precision. All of these are among those abilities most generally desired by employers of all types. Those who study philosophy therefore find themselves very well prepared to excel and to become leaders in whatever profession they might choose.

Though the study of philosophy is of general benefit no matter what one’s calling, it is particularly beneficial to those considering careers in law, public policy, journalism, business, religion, the health professions, education, and the human services.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Philosophers ask deep and important questions about a wide variety of topics, ranging from the nature of justice to question of free will, to the question of whether it is possible for human beings to have knowledge of God. Not only do philosophers ask questions like these, they seek out and debate answers to them, together in dialogue with colleagues from across the disciplines. This means that philosophical investigation necessarily involves not only the history of philosophical ideas, but the careful and critical examination of relevant facts and their interconnections, highly developed argumentation skills, and the ability to engage in cooperative dialogue for the common purpose of inquiry.

The academic benefits of philosophy are sharpened critical and analytical thinking skills, enhanced imaginative capacity, greater clarity and precision in communication, and heightened intellectual discipline. Philosophical training also greatly enhances one’s ability to enter into cooperative and informed argumentation and debate with others. These make the study of philosophy a perfect complement to almost any major, and a worthwhile and rewarding field of academic study in its own right.

In addition to the academic benefits, philosophy is invaluable in providing those who study it with the cognitive tools necessary for making competent, reflective and balanced judgments. Those with philosophical training are uniquely empowered to develop a consistent and coherent view of the world and of their place in it. In addition to these the personal benefits of philosophical study also include a more open mind, an enhanced sense of the moral worth of oneself and others, greater intellectual curiosity and enjoyment, and greater facility in careful thinking about problems whose difficulty mirrors that of real life problems.

ADMISSION/AUDITION PROGRAM REQUIREMENT
Students wishing to enroll in the Philosophy B.A. or Minor programs must be students in good academic standing at the College.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION FOR THE PROGRAM
The Philosophy program at Marygrove College offers students an intellectually and methodologically diverse approach to the discipline. The department has special strengths in the history of philosophy, Continental philosophy of religion, philosophy of language, value theory, and argumentation and critical thinking.

The instructional hallmark of all philosophy courses at Marygrove College is an emphasis on all of the following: critical thinking skills, close reading, clear writing, and interactive debate about philosophical topics.

In addition to the B.A. and Minor programs, the Philosophy program supports the General Education program of the College with a number of courses (see below) that provide students with a foundation in philosophical methods that can serve them throughout their academic career. Many of the department’s courses also support the College’s Urban Leadership Mission and Vision by incorporating course materials and assignments that apply philosophical methods of analysis and inquiry in urban contexts. See the course listings for more detail.

Philosophy courses are offered throughout the week in both day and evening sections. There are no special admissions procedures for the major or the minor. Any student wishing to join the program must simply be a student in good academic standing at Marygrove College. Those interested in joining the B.A. or Minor programs in Philosophy are encouraged to contact the Program Coordinator.

Psychology Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS

B.A. Level: Business • Corrections • Health Education • Mental Health Service • Rehabilitation • Graduate Level: Clinical & Counseling Psychology • Government Administration • Human Resource Management • Industrial & Organizational Psychology • Teaching and Research

GENERAL INFORMATION

Psychology is a discipline devoted to understanding the thought and behavior of people, and then channeling that knowledge into social and psychological services.

The program at Marygrove offers a sequence of courses, which take you through the areas of psychological development, socialization, learning, dysfunctional behavior and experimental psychology. The program is intended for day students only. The psychology major prepares you to be an informed and engaged citizen in our ever-changing world with respect for diversity and social justice issues.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

The Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology combines preparation for future graduate study and/or for direct application of psychological principles with employment after the B.A. The Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology requires a minimum of 33 credit hours in psychology and includes all proscribed courses (see below: Required Courses).

The Bachelor of Arts with an interdisciplinary major in art and psychology allows you to prepare for graduate study in art therapy. Required psychology courses contribute 32 credit hours to the interdisciplinary major. A minor is not required.

The minor in psychology provides knowledge of human behavior, which complements your major area of study. If you choose this option, you are required to take a minimum of 20 credit hours in psychology.

CAREER INFORMATION

At the B.A. level, psychology graduates can work in business or mental health/social services. In business, positions include work in advertising, customer relations, job analyst, marketing researcher or representative. In mental health, positions include rehabilitation counselor, group home coordinator, social service director, employment program manager, corrections and parole officer, and family service worker.

At the M.A. level, psychology graduates can do vocational, marriage, family, school or industrial consulting and psychological testing.

At the Ph.D. level, psychologists can be administrators, consultants, or college professors.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM

Program Scheduling

The B.A. program in Psychology is primarily a day program. Some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating basis.

Transfer Students

The Department of Psychology generally accepts transfer credits from accredited institutions of higher learning. For psychology majors, at least 15 credit hours in psychology must be earned at Marygrove. For the minor, you must take a minimum of nine psychology credit hours at Marygrove.

Academic Performance

Only psychology courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the major requirements.

Writing Intensive Requirement

All Psychology majors must complete PSY/SOC 360 to satisfy their writing intensive requirement.

Senior Seminar Requirement

All Psychology majors must complete PSY 496, Senior Seminar.

Honor Societies

Students may be eligible to join Psi Chi, a national honors society for students demonstrating academic excellence in Psychology.

Awards

Students whose academic work is excellent may be eligible for the Award for Excellence in Psychology.

Program Requirements 

Political Science Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Attorney • Career Development Specialist • Community Agency Staff • Federal, State, and Local Government Official Law Enforcement • Public and Private School Teacher • Nonprofit Administrator

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Department of Political Science offers an undergraduate major and minor that provides you with a wide variety of career and educational choices after graduation. You may choose to enter the work world of public (governmental) service or the social institutions that are important to our community, state, nation, and world. Or you may desire to continue your education in law school or graduate studies. Along with your course work in political science you will take relevant liberal arts courses and obtain meaningful field experience.

SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATION
The Department of Political Science offers a political science major and minor for secondary teacher certification. Additional requirements are detailed in the SECONDARY TEACHING CERTIFICATION section.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The major in political science consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours built on a core of five required courses. In addition to the College requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, political science majors and minors are encouraged to improve their opportunities in a variety of career and advanced academic areas by taking courses in statistics, research methods, and computer information systems.

The minor in political science requires a minimum of 20 semester hours, including three designated courses.

CAREER INFORMATION
Marygrove graduates in political science have found job opportunities as lawyers, federal, state, and local government officials, public and private school teachers, community agency staff, retail trade managers, and career development specialists. Many of these graduates have advanced to positions of significant leadership and authority in their fields.

Pharmacy Technician Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Pharmacy technicians help licensed pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals. They work in retail pharmacies and hospitals. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of Pharmacy Technicians is expected to increase by 20 percent from 2012- 2022. For further information, please visit: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Pharmacy Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/ pharmacy-technicians.htm.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Pharmacy Technology program is a two-semester, cohortbased, certificate program. This program prepares students to take the National Pharmacy Technician Certification (NPTC) Board’s certifying examination (http://www.ptcb.org ).

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
Effective in June 2015, Senate Bill 92 states that all Pharmacy Technicians be certified and licensed in the State of Michigan; they must take and pass the NPCT Board Exam in order to obtain this licensure.

Students who successfully pass the NPTC exam can apply the credit earned in the Certificate of Pharmacy Technology to the Associate of Science degrees at Marygrove College.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Program Scheduling
The Certificate in Pharmacy Technology program is primarily an evening program. Students in the cohort-based program complete the program in two academic semesters (fall, winter).

Transfer Student Information
The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines. However, prior pharmacy technology coursework cannot be transferred in.

Academic
Performance Standard Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Certificate in Pharmacy Technology.

Externship
Pharmacy Technology students complete a required externship during their second semester when they enroll in PHT 170.

Admissions
Students must complete the Undergraduate Admissions Application and be accepted to the College prior to starting the Program.

Students must demonstrate proficiency in Basic Mathematics (MTH 099) through ACT scores or the College Placement test before entering the program.

Peer Recovery Mentoring Program

Peer Recovery Mentoring Program

Marygrove College

and the Continuing Education & Career Enhancement in collaboration with the Social Work Department is pleased to announce the development of our PEER RECOVERY MENTORING PROGRAM

Pre-Engineering

Engineers help people and society by creating innovative designs ranging from limb prostheses, joint replacements and heart machines to automobiles, airplanes and computers, to clean water processes, wind turbines and solar panels for alternative energy. Engineers and Engineering Technologists then design and oversee the manufacturing processes to ensure quality products are provided to customers.

The Pre-Engineering program at Marygrove College can be a great stepping stone whether you want to be an architectural, electrical, mechanical, civil or any other engineer. Marygrove’s Pre-Engineering Program has been designed to give you a strong foundation in math, science and basic engineering principles that you can build upon through further and more specialized study. You will be introduced to the engineering professions through internships, field experiences, lectures and guest speakers, and learn about workplace expectations and problem-solving through teamwork.

Students interested in Pre-Engineering should declare a B.S. in Mathematics major and will take a program of study that will prepare students to transfer to Engineering and Engineering Technology programs at other institutions to complete their upper level courses for graduation. Dual diploma programs and integrated Master’s Degree programs are also being developed.

Pre-Engineering Core:
CHM 140 General Chemistry II
ISC 222 Introduction to Engineering
MTH 251 Calculus I
MTH 252 Calculus II
MTH 254 Calculus III
MTH 353 Linear Algebra
MTH 371 Differential Equations
PHY 285 Physics I
PHY 286 Physics II

Additional courses are needed depending on the type of engineering program you choose to pursue. Students must achieve a C or higher in the pre-engineering core courses and maintain a minimum overall GPA of 2.5.

Physics Overview

The physics courses at Marygrove provide a general introduction to physics.

If you are a science major or minor, or if you are preparing for a career in engineering, medicine/health, forensic science, or as a science teacher, the physics sequence will introduce you to the fundamental concepts and investigations to complement your program of study.

Post-Degree Certificate in Accounting

The following courses are required for the Certificate of Completion in Accounting:
BUS 173     Introduction to Business
ACC 224     Principles of Accounting I
ACC 234     Principles of Accounting II
ACC 324     Intermediate Accounting I
ACC 334     Managerial Accounting
ACC 344     Intermediate Accounting II

Eighteen of the hours must be taken at Marygrove College. Persons with special skills or needs may establish an individualized program upon consultation with and approval of the business department head.

Professional Development for Teachers

Professional Development for Teachers

GENERAL INFORMATION

In collaboration with Learners Edge, PLS 3rd Learning, and Teachscape; Marygrove College offers courses carrying graduate credit or Michigan Department of Education, State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECHs) for continuing professional growth and development of teachers and school administrators.

Pharmacy Technician Courses

PHT 101 Introduction to Pharmacy Technology 3 hours
Prerequisites: none
This course provides an overview of the qualifications, operational guidelines, and job duties of a pharmacy technician. Topics include history and the scope of pharmacy, legal and ethical guidelines, pharmacy operations, medication control, policies and procedures, and medication safety.

PHT 103 Mathematics for Health Careers 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 099 with a grade of C or better, or math placement by exam
In this course students will apply basic mathematical skills in calculations required for dosage determinations, as well as solution preparations using weight, metric, household, and apothecary systems.

PHT 118 Medical Terminology 2 hours
Prerequisites: none
This course is designed for students with an active interest in the medical and paramedical fields. The course provides the student with the fundamental principles needed to understand medical vocabulary. The student will learn to use the techniques of word building with an emphasis on spelling, pronunciation and the meanings of medical terms as related to the systems of the human body.

PHT 121 Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians 4 hours
Prerequisites: PHT 101, PHT 103, PHT 118, PHT 130
This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of pharmacology as they relate to all of the body’s systems, and presents basic pharmacology with emphasis on drug therapy. The course content includes drug laws, terminology, therapeutic classes of drugs, indications, side effects, contraindications, and generic and trade names.

PHT 123 Hospital Pharmacy 3 hours
Prerequisites: PHT 101, PHT 103, PHT 118, PHT 130
This course explores the unique role and practice of pharmacy technician in a hospital pharmacy. Students will be introduced to the daily operations of hospital pharmacy including the process of medication distribution systems, inpatient drug delivery systems, unit dose chart files, quality assurance, drug storage, preparations of intravenous admixtures, compounding, manufacturing and repackaging, and inventory control systems.

PHT 130 Pharmacy Practice I 3 hours
Prerequisites: none
This course focuses on the skills necessary to interpret, prepare, label, and maintain records on medication orders and prescriptions. This course will train the student in the administration of supply, inventory, data entry, and third party billing. The students will learn the many dosage formulations and administration, how the body metabolizes drugs, and will have a basic understanding of how drugs are classified and what conditions or diseases each class of drug treats. Roleplaying will be used. Students will apply for PTCB exam.

PHT 131 Pharmacy Practice II 3 hours
Prerequisites: PHT 101, PHT 103, PHT 118, PHT 130
This course is an overall review process of pharmacy practice with hands-on labs to evaluate student’s abilities to perform various pharmacy computer operations related to the community pharmacy practice setting. Students will demonstrate proficiency in prescription processing, professionalism, communication skills, and pharmacy laws.

PHT 170 Pharmacy Technology Field Practicum 3 hours
Prerequisites: PHT 101, PHT 103, PHT 118, PHT 130; Fee: yes
This is an exploration of the unique role and practice of pharmacy technicians in a pharmacy with emphasis on daily pharmacy operations. Students will be assigned an experiential training site and work under the supervision of a registered pharmacist for approximately 80 hours. Emphasis is placed on assisting the pharmacist in serving patients, medication distribution, inventory control, and pharmacy operations. The last 6 weeks of the course will include an overview and review of pharmacy practice to prepare the student to take the national PTCB exam.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Bachelor of Arts, Child Development Major (B.A.)

A. General Education Requirements
See GENERAL EDUCATION section of this catalog.

B. Required Major Courses
BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle
CD 213 Infant/Toddler: Care and Education
CD 223 Professional Partnerships in Early Childhood Education: Child, Family, School, and Community
PSY 240 Developmental Psychology
CD 241 Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Education
CD 326 Administration of Developmental Centers
CD 333 Math/Science Methods
CD 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics
CD 375 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Education
CD 398 Assessment of Young Children
CD 399 Child Development Practicum
CD 420 The Exceptional Child in Early Childhood Education
CD 496 Senior Seminar
EDU/ENG 205 Children’s Literature

C. Minor
A minor is required.

D. Electives (as needed and appropriate to equal 128 credits)

Philosophy Minor

Students who enjoy philosophy, wish to develop their philosophical skills or who are considering careers in law, business, or medicine can all benefit from a Minor in Philosophy. The Minor in philosophy requires 20 credit hours in philosophy courses, including these required courses: PHL 126: Persons and Values, and PHL 276: Critical Thinking. The remaining 14 credits are chosen in accord with an individualized plan created by the student, the student’s academic adviser, and the Philosophy Program Coordinator. For more information contact the Coordinator of the Philosophy program.

Physics Course Descriptions

PHY 135 Conceptual Physics 4 hours
Prerequisite: MTH 100; LS 105; Fee: yes; Term: Winter (odd). General Education option
A descriptive and mathematical look at physics. Conceptual development and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Includes the study of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Laboratory included.

PHY 200 Introduction to Astronomy: Exploring The Universe 2 hours
Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental and foundational courses; Term: TBA
This course presents an introduction to the scientific field of Astronomy, from our earliest observations to our latest space missions. A wide range of topics will be discussed, including modern observational methods, our solar system, stars, celestial mechanics, light, optics, and cosmology.

PHY 285 Physics I: Mechanics & Sound 4 hours
Prerequisite: MTH 251; Term: Fall; Fee: yes
This course offers an introduction to the field of classical mechanics from a calculus based perspective. The study of motion will be the primary focus. Topics include: Vectors, kinematics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, dynamics, gravity, work and energy, rotational motion, oscillations and mechanical waves. Laboratory included.

PHY 286 Physics II: Electricity & Light 4 hours
Prerequisite: PHY 285; Term: Winter; Fee: yes
This course builds upon the lessons learned in PHY 285 with a focus on electricity, magnetism and light. Course topics include: Electrostatics, AC and DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic radiation, optics, as well as a brief survey of modern physics topics such as relativity and the Standard Model. Laboratory Included.

Political Science Minor

The minor requires 20 credit hours in political science including the following:

A. Required Courses
POL 149 American Political Systems
POL 203 Political Reality and Public Policy
POL 377 Transnational Politics
                 -OR-
POL 395 Comparative Politics

 

Provisional Certification

State of Michigan approved courses for compliance with 2000 reading requirements for provisional certification

A. ELEMENTARY
RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
OR
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction

B. SECONDARY
RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development

State of Michigan approved courses for compliance with 2000 reading requirements for provisional certification

A. ELEMENTARY
RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
OR
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction

B. SECONDARY
RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development

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Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove