11
Dec 13

Graduate students who are in good standing in a degree program are eligible to take graduate courses at several graduate schools in Michigan with prior approval of their Home and potential Host Institutions[1]. This program enables graduate students to take advantage of unique educational opportunities throughout the state. See the information below for a list of participating institutions and MIGS liaison officers. 

PROCEDURE

First, the student and her/his academic advisor identify course(s) at a participating university that are needed for the student’s program of study and are unavailable at her/his Home Institution. Next the student obtains a MIGS application from the MIGS liaison officer at the Home Institution. When signatures of the student’s academic advisor and MIGS liaison officer have been obtained, signifying that the student is qualified and eligible to take course(s) for transfer back to the program of study, the Home Institution MIGS liaison forwards the application to the Host Institution MIGS liaison for review and approval. The Host Institution MIGS liaison will ensure that the course(s) will be offered in the anticipated semester or term and that there is sufficient space available to allow for enrollment by a guest student. Once admission has been approved by the Host Institution, the MIGS liaison or Admission’s Office at the Host Institution issues admissions documents and provides registration instructions to the student.

After completing the course(s), the student is responsible for arranging to have an official transcript sent from the Host Institution to the Home Institution. The student should also contact the MIGS liaison at the Home Institution to indicate that a transcript is being sent for posting on the academic record per guidelines of the Home Institution. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

FEES AND FINANCIAL AID: Students on MIGS enrollment pay tuition and other fees normally charged by the Host Institution for the services rendered. Students on MIGS enrollment are not eligible for financial aid from the Host Institution.

RESIDENCY STATUS is the same as at the Home Institution.

CREDIT: All credit earned under a MIGS enrollment will be accepted by a student’s Home Institution as agreed and posted according to the transcripting practices of the Home Institution.

GRADES earned in MIGS courses may be applied toward the Home Institution grade point average or used for credit toward a graduate degree as allowed by the Home Institution’s policy.

PART-TIME: A student may combine a part-time enrollment at the Home Institution with a part-time enrollment at the Host Institution with prior approval of the student’s academic advisor (and SEVIS officer for international F-1 students). The Home Institution agrees to obtain the documentation necessary to combine the enrollments into a single enrollment status and to update the student’s enrollment time status with the National Student Loan Clearinghouse or other time status reporting agency as appropriate.

FELLOWSHIPS: MIGS participation does not necessarily impact fellowship commitments made by the Home Institution for a given period. Financial aid issues should be negotiated by the student and appropriate officials prior to participating in MIGS.

ENROLLMENTS are limited to the minimum number of credits required for full-time graduate status at the Home Institution.

TRANSCRIPTS: The student is responsible for arranging to have one transcript certifying completion of course work sent from the Host Institution to the Home Institution.

[1] (The Home Institution is where the student is currently enrolled in a graduate degree program; the Host Institution is where the student wishes to be a guest.)

 

ANDREWS UNIVERSITY

Christon Arthur - Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies & Research

4150 Administration Drive

Berrien Springs, MI 49104

(269) 471-3405 / (269) 471-6246 (Fax)

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AQUINAS COLLEGE

Chad Gunnoe – Provost & Dean of Faculty

1607 Robinson Road SE

Grand Rapids, MI 49506

(616) 632-2151 / (616) 732-4432 (Fax)

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CALVIN COLLEGE

Cindi Hoekstra - Graduate Program Coordinator

3201 Burton Street SE

Grand Rapids, MI 49546

(616) 526-6158 / (616) 526-6505 (Fax)

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Roger Coles – Interim Dean of Graduate Studies

100 Foust Hall

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859

(989) 774-4890 / (989) 774-3439 (Fax)

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EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Susan Anderson – Administrative Manager

Graduate School, 200 Boone Hall

Ypsilanti, MI 48197

(734) 487-0048 / (734) 487-0050 (Fax)

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FERRIS STATE UNIVERSITY

Nancy Hogan – Graduate Education Coordinator

1301 South State Street, IRC 119

Big Rapids, MI 49307

(231) 591-2650 / (231) 591-2673 (Fax)

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OAKLAND UNIVERSITY

Claire Rammel - Executive Director of Graduate Study and Lifelong Learning

520 O’Dowd Hall

Rochester, MI 48309

(248) 370-3159 / (248) 370-3226 (Fax)

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SACRED HEART MAJOR SEMINARY

John Meldrum - Assistant Dean/Registrar

2701 Chicago Blvd.

Detroit, MI 48206

(313) 883-8512/ (313)883-8682 (fax)

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SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY

Donald J. Bachand – Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

7400 Bay Road

University Center, MI 48170

(989) 964-4296 / (989) 964-7030 (Fax)

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SIENA HEIGHTS UNIVERSITY

Anne Hooghart – Dean of the Graduate College

1247 East Siena Heights Drive

Adrian, MI 49221

(517) 264-7665 / (517) 264-7714 (Fax)

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UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY

Paula Dykstra – Associate Registrar

4001 W. McNichols Road

Detroit, MI 48221-3038

(313) 993-3313 / (313) 993-3317 (Fax)

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GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY

Jeffrey Potteiger - Dean of Graduate Studies  

401 W. Fulton Street - 318C DeVos Center
Grand Rapids, MI 49504

(616) 331-7105 / (616) 331-7317 (Fax)

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MADONNA UNIVERSITY

Deborah Dunn – Dean of the Graduate School

36600 Schoolcraft Road

Livonia, MI 48150

(734) 432-5457 / (734) 432-5862 (Fax)

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MARYGROVE UNIVERSITY

Jane Hammang-Buhl – Vice President for Academic Affairs

8425 West McNichols Road

Detroit, MI 48221-2599

(313) 927-1207 / (313) 927-1523(Fax) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Denise Greenhoe - Assistant to the Graduate School Dean

479 W. Circle Drive, Room 118

East Lansing, MI 48824

(517) 355-0301 / (517) 353-3355 (Fax)

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MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY

Nancy Byers-Sprague - Assistant to the Dean of the Graduate School

1400 Townsend Drive

Houghton, MI 49931

(906) 487-2755 / (906) 487-2284 (Fax)

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NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Brian Cherry - Assistant Provost of Graduate

Education & Research

401 Cohodas Hall 1401

Presque Isle Avenue

Marquette, MI 49855

(906) 227-2300 / (906) 227-2315(Fax)

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - ANN ARBOR

Lee Eriksson – Administrative Specialist

Suite 0120, 915 E. Washington Street

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070

(734) 647-4543 / (734) 647-7740 (Fax)

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN – DEARBORN

Soraya Jeffries Patton – Assistant Registrar

4901 Evergreen Road, Room 1169 Univ. Center

Dearborn, MI 48128

(313) 593-4753 / (313) 593-5697 (Fax)

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN – FLINT

Brad Maki – Director of Graduate Admissions

303 E. Kearsley Street

Flint, MI 48502

(810)762-3171 / (810) 766-6789 (Fax)

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WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

Kathy Lueckeman- Graduate Admissions Director

5057 Woodward Ave., Suite 6000

Detroit, MI 48202

(313) 577-4723 / (313) 577-4459 (Fax)

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WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Jennifer Holm – Coordinator, Thesis and Dissertation

Kalamazoo, MI 49008

(269) 387-8271 / (269) 387-8232 (Fax)

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19
Mar 12

As a student transferring to Marygrove College you may be eligible for some great academic & financial perks. Marygrove offers noncompetitive scholarships that are renewable up to 3 years ranging from $4,200 - $10,500 per academic year. All you have to do is three simple steps and Marygrove will do the rest:

  • Fill out an application online or in person
  • Complete your Fafsa
  • Have your official transcripts sent from the schools you have attended

If you would like to have your transcripts evaluated and to sign up for a campus tour we can be reached at 313-927-1240.

Transfer Advantage /How to transfer to Marygrove College

Transferring to Marygrove College is easy and gives you the chance to experience assistance from Marygrove's Admissions staff from the first inquiry, all the way to the first day of class.

Here are the steps to transferring to Marygrove College

Read more: Transfer Student Advantage Scholarship Information

25
Jan 12

(Associate and Bachelor’s Degree Candidates Only) Thursday, May 8 • 7:00 p.m.

Sacred Heart Chapel, Liberal Arts Building

The Baccalaureate Ceremony consists of the procession, Mass, hooding and the sending off of students. To ensure candidates celebrate and enjoy this ceremony, please follow the guidelines below.

Read more: Undergraduate Degree Candidate Baccalaureate Ceremony

20
Oct 10

Fall

Registration for Fall Semester

Classes Begin

Add/Drop Period

Graduation Application Deadline Dec and May 

Founder’s Day Academic Convocation

Last Day to Withdraw (15-wk Class)

Thanksgiving Break

Study Day

Final Examinations

Official End of Fall Semester

Grades Due

April 1 – September 1

September 2  

September 2-9

September 12

November 12

November 24

November 27 - 30

December 9

December 10-16

December 16

December 18 at 12 at noon 

Winter

Graduation Deadline for May

Graduation Deadline for August 

Registration for Winter Semester 

Classes Begin 

Add/Drop Period 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday 

Spring Break 

Last Day to Withdraw (15-wk Class) 

Easter Break 

Final Examinations 

Official End of Winter Semester

Grades Due

Commencement 

September 12

April 1 

October 27 - January 12

January 12 

January 12-17 

January 19 

March 1-7 

April 11 

April 1-3 

April 27 - May 2 

May 2

May 5 at noon

May 9 

Summer

Registration for Summer Term 

Graduation Deadline for August 

Official Start of Summer Term

Session I Classes

Memorial Day Holiday

Session II Classes

Independence Day Holiday

Official End of Summer Term 

Grades Due

March 9 - May 11 

April 1 

May 11

May 11 - June 20

May 25

June 22 - August 12

July 4

August 15 

August 18 at noon 

12
Feb 10

In some instances, the student may transfer semester hours of graduate credit to a Marygrove graduate program from another accredited graduate institution. However, the following provisions apply.

Read more: Transfer Credit (Graduate Students)

12
Feb 10

Marygrove College is pleased to offer prospective students the ability to check the transferability of courses taken at other institutions. Please review the information provided below which will help you in understanding our transfer credit policy. We are continuously updating our transfer equivalencies; if a course is not listed, it has not yet been evaluated and may or may not be transferable.

Read more: Transfer Credit Equivalency

12
Feb 10

All interested students must meet the Marygrove College admission requirements for transfer students as outlined in the catalog. Only those courses with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) or better or the equivalent score are eligible to be considered for transfer to Marygrove College. Interested students can obtain general education and academic program transfer guides from the College and/or Marygrove Admissions Department.
The student must have a good foundation in the social sciences, English, humanities, natural science, and American government.

Read more: Transfer Agreements

11
Feb 10

Courtyard Marriott Detroit Southfield

27027 Northwestern Highway

Southfield, MI 48033

Reservations: (800) 321-2211 http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/dtwsf

Local: (248) 358-1222

 

Comfort Inn Dearborn Overlooking Greenfield Village

20061 Michigan Avenue

Dearborn, MI 48214

Reservations: (877) 424-6423

Local: (313) 436-9600

 

Hilton Garden Inn – Downtown Detroit

351 Gratiot

Detroit, MI  48226

Reservations:  (1-877-STAY-HGI)  www.detroitdowntown.hgi.com

Local:  (313) 967-0900

 

Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance

400 Renaissance Center

Detroit, MI 48243

Reservations: (800) 352-0831 or www.marriott.com

Local (313) 568-8000

 

The Westin Southfield

1500 Town Center

Southfield, MI 48075

Reservations: (800) 937-8461 or www.westinsouthfielddetroit.com

Local (248) 827-4000

 

Note: Marygrove College will not be held liable for any charges in relation to reservations,

room charges, taxes, etc., at any hotel listed above. Reservations and hotel accommodations

are voluntary and at the sole discretion of each student and their guest.

 

11
Feb 10

Accounting
The post-degree Certificate of Completion in Accounting is a 23-credit hour program for students with undergraduate degrees in other fields who are interested in acquiring basic knowledge and skills in the area of accounting. For more information see the Accounting section of the undergraduate catalog.

African American Studies
The Ethnic/Cultural Studies program offers an 18-hour certification program for students interested in developing a broad-based knowledge of the activities, contributions, and impact of African Americans on the Americas. The program is especially useful for enhancing career flexibility. Knowledge of African American culture benefits those individuals whose careers may involve extensive contact with the African American community. For details, see the Ethnic/Cultural Studies program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Business
The Department of Business offers a 20- credit hour certification program for post-degree students resulting in a Certificate of Completion. This program is designed for a person with a bachelor’s degree in any field other than business who is interested in obtaining the basic skills generally acquired in a business curriculum. For details, see the Business program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Child Welfare
The 17-credit hour certificate program in child welfare is intended for those who are interested in learning the issues involved in children’s welfare or in developing skills for working with children. This program can be particularly useful for the professional practitioner with a bachelor’s degree or for paraprofessionals who have a high school diploma or a GED and are presently working with children in the areas of child development and/or child welfare. For details, see the Child Welfare program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Computer Graphics
Computer Graphics is an 18-credit hour concentrated experience in computer graphics for the post-degree art major. While the emphasis is placed on graphic design and desktop publishing, you can also elect a more experimental approach to the medium. For details, see the Art program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Computer Information Systems
The Department of Computer Information Systems offers an 18-credit hour certification program for post-degree students. This program assures an understanding of computer information systems but is not equivalent to a major in computer information systems. For details, see the Computer Information Systems program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Detroit Studies
The undergraduate certificate in Detroit Studies consists of at least fifteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework devoted to analysis of metropolitan Detroit. Students who complete this certificate will learn about Detroit’s contributions to American culture; they will interrogate standard definitions and popular versions of the city; and, by analyzing the city from the perspectives of different academic disciplines, they will gain in-depth understanding of issues important to the metropolitan area. For details, see the Institute for Detroit Studies section of the undergraduate catalog.

Gerontology
The 15-credit hour certificate program in gerontology is intended for those who are interested in learning the issues involved in aging or in developing skills for working with the elderly. This program can be particularly useful for the professional practitioner with a bachelor’s degree or for persons who have completed at least two years of undergraduate course work. For details, see the Gerontology program section of the undergraduate catalog.

Sacred Music
The certificate program in Sacred Music offers training which will prepare the candidate for effective professional activity in the field of church music. Courses may be elected for non-credit or credit. For details, see the Music program section of the undergraduate catalog. An audition is required for acceptance into the program.

Teacher Certification
The Department of Education, in cooperation with other academic units, prepares students for teaching at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. Entrance into the College does not guarantee admission to the teacher certification program. Students must make a separate application to the teacher certification program. Prior to admission to the certification program, you will be assigned an advisor who will assist you in planning the sequence of certification courses. Students must have a certifiable major and minor and adhere to the certification requirements in order to obtain teacher certification. For details, see the Teacher Certification section of the undergraduate catalog.

Translator Certification
The certificate program in translation may be completed in Arabic, French or Spanish. The fifteen (15)-credit hour program helps students prepare for the American Translators Association (ATA) certification examination. For details, see the Arabic, French or Spanish sections of the undergraduate catalog.

Women’s Studies
The Ethnic/Cultural Studies program offers an 18-hour certification program for students interested in learning about the roles, perspectives, and contributions of women in an interdisciplinary context. The program is especially useful for enhancing career flexibility. Knowledge of gender strengthens students’ preparation for work in many diverse fields, especially those where sensitivity to women’s issues is important such as education, business, human services, public administration, health professions, law and government, and environmental and nonprofit organizations. For details, see the Ethnic/Cultural Studies program section of the undergraduate catalog.

11
Feb 10

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) — Overview of Requirements
Marygrove has established general undergraduate degree requirements that apply to all candidates for bachelor (or baccalaureate) degrees. In order to earn a bachelor’s degree at Marygrove, you must meet the following criteria:

Total Credit Hours
Candidates for a bachelor’s degree must complete a minimum of 128 semester hours of credit in an approved degree program.

Credit Hours in Developmental and Foundational Studies
In order to earn a bachelor’s degree, you must complete all the Developmental/Foundational studies courses in mathematics, learning strategies, and composition that were indicated by your placement test results. Credits in Developmental level courses do not count in your total hours toward your degree.

Only 12 hours of lower division (100-200 level) composition courses, whether transfer or Marygrove credit, may be included in the 128 credit hours needed for a bachelor’s degree. If you have more than 12 hours of lower division composition credits, the surplus hours will count as general college credit beyond the minimum of 128 credits required for a degree.

Only 3 hours of basic algebra may be included in the 128 credit hours needed for the bachelor’s degree. If you have more than 3 algebra credits at a level below Marygrove’s MTH 105, they will count as general college credit beyond the minimum of 128 credits required for a degree.

Because of Marygrove’s commitment to liberal education, those students who elect a Bachelor of Arts degree must show evidence of a broad range of knowledge and skill in addition to specialized knowledge and skill in one or more areas.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
The Bachelor of Science degree can be elected by students majoring in the following areas of study: biology, chemistry, environmental science, forensic science, general science, mathematics, and computer information systems. The general education requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree are the same as those for the Bachelor of Arts degree. For the B.S. degree, however, your total degree program must include 48 hours of related science and mathematics. Specifics of the degree requirements are available through the departments involved.

Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.)
The Bachelor of Applied Science is an interdisciplinary degree program which builds on technical or occupational knowledge a student has acquired prior to enrolling at Marygrove College. The degree requires completion of general education requirements and 60-72 hours in an area of specialization. For details, see the Computer Information Systems section of the undergraduate catalog.

Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.)
The Bachelor of Business Administration degree is a specialized degree consisting of a minimum of 60 credit hours in a range of business subjects and a concentration in accounting, business administration, financial planning, management or marketing. A maximum of 70 credits in business and accounting courses may be counted toward the 128 credit hours required for the degree. The general education requirements for the B.B.A. degree are outlined in the General Education section of the catalog. You must also complete the related discipline courses in computer information systems and economics required for the B.B.A. degree. For details, see the Business program section of this catalog.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts/Visual Arts (B.F.A.)
The Bachelor of Fine Arts/Visual Arts represents a concentration and accomplishment beyond that required in the major program for the Bachelor of Arts. Intensified in both scope and depth, the program is designed for students with marked ability and commitment. Students are required to make specific application for candidacy. Often requiring more than eight semesters, the program is detailed under the Art section of the undergraduate catalog.

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.)
The Bachelor of Music degree represents a specialized program emphasizing the knowledge, skills, and disciplines essential for a musician. The degree program has four major components: general education, general and specialized music requirements, minor requirements, and electives. Within the degree program, students may specialize in applied organ, piano, guitar, flute, or voice; music education; sacred music; piano pedagogy, or music theory. Approximately 80-85 credit hours in music are required for the Bachelor of Music degree. Specifics of the general and specialized music requirements are listed in the Music section of the undergraduate catalog.

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)
The Bachelor of Social Work degree is a specialized program representing a concentration in the social sciences and social welfare, and competency in social work practice. The degree program has four interrelated components: general education requirements, supportive social science cognates for the interdisciplinary major, professional core requirements, and electives. Specific requirements for each of the four components are listed in the Social Work program section of the undergraduate catalog. A concentration of approximately 65 credit hours in social work, sociology, and psychology is required. A student majoring in social work develops the components of this interdisciplinary program in consultation with a departmental advisor. Students are required to apply for and be accepted into the social work program.
11
Feb 10

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR’S DEGREES

I. Mission

The General Education curriculum helps build the foundation for understanding historical traditions, contemporary issues, the interdependence of local, urban, national and global communities and the importance of psychological, artistic, religious and scientific inquiry. This program is designed to give the student the opportunity to interact with the multifaceted forces that are continually transforming and reshaping our world. The broad based, interdisciplinary scope of the area requirements is designed to help students acquire the knowledge, perspective, skill and professional acumen that is necessary to become thoughtful and responsible citizens and leaders in an increasingly complex world.

The General Education curriculum is focused on fostering urban leadership by developing the cross-curricular emphases of writing effectively, thinking critically, managing information successfully, valuing diversity, practicing social justice, presenting orally and visually and learning to learn.

II. Curricular Emphases

To accomplish these goals the general education curriculum, through its cross-disciplinary approach, provides exposure to a wide variety of disciplines while focusing on developing the essential, broad based, intellectual abilities of problem solving, decision making and leadership with a commitment to lifelong learning. The general education program emphasizes the development of oral and written communication skills; knowledge of the arts, sciences and technology; the effective use of information and critical thinking skills; the value of diversity; the promotion of social justice; and the interrelationships among academic fields.

Writing Effectively

Writing is essential. Effective writing encourages logical thinking and enables you to influence your audience. At Marygrove‚ all general education courses provide opportunities to learn and to express yourself through writing. Through composition courses and writing-intensive courses, you will demonstrate your ability to use English correctly and effectively.

Managing Information

In order to manage the overabundance of information available in contemporary society, educated citizens and professionals need to master the information literacy skills that will help them understand how to access, evaluate and use information appropriate to their needs. The Marygrove library provides specialized, course-integrated instruction, in all areas and at all levels of study, to educate students on the latest concepts and technologies. Students learn to use a variety of tools to find general and scholarly information from a broad range of media, formulate appropriate and effective search strategies, and critically evaluate information sources.

Communicating Orally and Visually

Oral communications are an essential part of a liberal arts education. Effective communication in today’s society requires more than the acquisition of writing and oral presentation skills. Marygrove also expects students to develop skills in using visual communications technologies, and to integrate multi-faceted media tools in order to enhance presentations and connect more meaningfully with audiences.

Valuing Diversity

Marygrove provides a climate for understanding and expressing your own identity and for understanding and valuing the identity of others. Respect and compassion mark Marygrove’s attitude toward human differences. Your courses will prepare you to live as a responsible citizen in an interdependent global community.

Thinking Critically

Critical thinking is a diverse analytical skill set that centers on the following abilities: 1) thinking within formal, systematic frameworks, 2) interpreting and evaluating such frameworks themselves, and 3) applying formal, systematic and analytical methods to the solution of concrete problems.

Understanding Social Justice

Social justice is fundamental to Marygrove’s mission. In general education courses, you will address complex social issues and attempt to solve social problems in creative ways. Marygrove also provides opportunities for involvement in various social justice advocacy activities. The College encourages you to develop a lasting concern for justice‚ equity‚ and human rights so that you will be an effective participant in our complex world.

Learning to Learn

Students must be prepared for a world of constant change. A Marygrove education lays the foundation for a life of learning by providing students with opportunities for training and life experiences that encourage intellectual versatility and continued growth in both personal and professional life beyond the years of formal education.

III. General Education Components

Basic Educational Proficiency Requirements

Reading at college level

Coursework determined by prior academic performance and/or placement testing.

Mathematics proficiency through MTH 100 or a mathematics course whose content is more advanced than MTH 100

Coursework determined by prior academic performance and/or placement testing.

Writing proficiency through ENG 108

Coursework determined by prior academic performance and/or placement testing.

Computer competency

Certified through the Student Technology Instruction Center (STIC) and verified through the major.

Oral communication

Verified through the major.

IV.  Common Experience Requirements

Liberal Arts Seminar

The first-year seminar is a required course for newly enrolled first-year students with fewer than 32 transfer credits.

Communications

ENG 312: Advanced Written and Oral Communications (3 hours) is required for all candidates for bachelor’s degrees. Prerequisites: ENG 108 and at least two courses in the student’s major. Students must complete English 312 before taking the Senior Seminar.

Interdisciplinary Studies (3 hours)

All students will select and complete one of the following 300 level courses aimed at investigating a single topic from an interdisciplinary perspective.

IS 320              Detroit Seminar

IS 322              Technology Seminar

IS 324              Social Justice Seminar

IS 326AH       Religion and Science

IS 326B          Travel Seminar
IS 326C          HIV/AIDS: Its Biological & Social Impact

IS 326G          Globalization in Context

Writing-intensive course in major

Writing-enhanced courses in each discipline reinforce and build upon basic composition skills, providing opportunities to learn course content through writing. Students must take one writing-intensive course in the major to learn the specific stylistic expectations in each field of study. See catalog section for the particular major to determine the designated writing-intensive course.

Senior Seminar

Through the Senior Seminar experience, the director of each major program verifies that the graduate has attained oral and written communication skills consistent with College objectives. This is one of the purposes of the Senior-Year Experience. See catalog section for the particular major to determine the designated Senior Seminar course. Students must successfully complete ENG 312 before taking Senior Seminar/Workshop courses.

V.      Area Requirements

Students will select a minimum of one 3-4 credit hour course in each of the following seven areas. Courses must be distributed across at least six different liberal arts disciplines and may not be counted towards credit-hour requirements for both General Education and a single discipline major

Historical and Cultural Traditions (3 hours)
Explores the heritage of diverse peoples and the impact of change over time.

AH 101               Looking at Art

ENG 222        Intro to African American Literature

HIS 252          United States to 1877

HIS 253          United States Since 1877

HUM 150       Contemporary Cultural Studies

MUS 105        Encounters With Music

Literature and Languages (3 hours)

Emphasizes the power and uses of words.

ENG 160        Introduction to Literature

FRE 150         Elementary French I

SPA 150         Elementary Spanish I

Scientific Inquiry (4 hours lab science)

Introduces modern concepts of investigating the natural world.

BIO 139         Principles of Biology

BIO 201         Ecology and the Environment

BIO 257         Human Anatomy and Physiology

CHM 130       Chemical Science

ENV 135        Earth Science

ISC 210       Integrated Science I

ISC 211       Integrated Science II
PHY 135        Conceptual Physics

Science Majors may use the following courses to fulfill this requirement

CHM 140   General Chemistry I

BIO  150   Biology I

Social Environment (3 hours)

Examines the dynamics of human communities and societies.

ECN 200        Introductory Macroeconomics

ECN 202        Economic Dimensions

PSY 205         Introductory Psychology
SOC 201        Sociological Perspectives

SOC 202        Social Problems
POL 149        American Political Systems

POL 203     Political Reality and Public Policy

Religious and Philosophical Traditions (3 hours)

Explores systems of belief and the pursuit of wisdom.

PHL 126        Persons and Values

PHL 201        Western Philosophical Traditions I

PHL 202        Western Philosophical Traditions II
PHL 225        Ethics
PHL 276        Critical Thinking
RS 226            Black Religion in the Americas

RS 227            Religion in America

Creative Expression (3 hours)

Examines the creative process in the context of studio or workshop experience.

ART 105        Introductory Studio

ART 187        Ceramic Experiences for the Non-Major

ART 235        Intro to Art Therapy

ART 237     Readings in Art Therapy I

ART 238     Readings in Art Therapy II    

DAN 150A    Elementary Ballet I
TRE 161        Fundamentals of Acting

(formerly DAN 161)

DAN 170A    Elementary Modern I

DAN 180     Elementary Jazz

MUS 100A     Class Piano I

MUS 101        Fundamentals of Music I

MUS 106A     Voice Class I

Global Perspectives (3 hours)

Investigates the world beyond our borders.

AH 200               Wonders of World Art: Ancient to Gothic

GEO 199        World Geography: Regions & Concepts

HIS 255          World History I

HIS 256          World History II

RS 150            Religion in the World

HUM 257       Humanities of the Ancient World
HUM 258       Humanities of the Modern World

General Education Requirements for

Associate’s Degrees

I. Basic Educational Proficiency Requirements

     Reading at College level

         Coursework determined by prior academic                                       performance and/or placement testing

     Mathematics proficiency to MTH 100 or equivalent

         Coursework determined by prior academic                                       performance and/or placement testing

     Writing proficiency to ENG 108

         Coursework determined by prior academic                                       performance and/or placement testing.

     Computer competency

         Certified through the Student Technology Instruction                     Center (STIC).

II. Common Experience Requirement Liberal Arts Seminar

The first-year seminar is a required course for newly enrolled first-year students with fewer than 32 transfer credits.

III. Area Requirements

Students completing an associate’s degree in Liberal Studies will select a minimum of one 3- or 4-hour course in each of the 7 Area Requirements.. Courses must be distributed across at least six different liberal arts disciplines.

Students completing all other Associate’s Degrees will select a minimum of one 3- or 4- hour course in at least 5 of the 7 areas. Courses must be distributed across at least 4 different liberal arts disciplines.

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Thu Aug 28 @ 9:00AM - 05:00PM
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Thu Aug 28 @ 9:00AM - 05:00PM
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29Aug
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New Student Orientation
01Sep
Mon Sep 01 @12:00AM
School Closed: Labor Day
02Sep
Tue Sep 02 @12:00AM
First Day of Classes

Campus News Blog

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Marygrove College In the News
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[Baseball] Baseball Lands Key NCAA Division II Transfer
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[Women's Volleyball] Top 10: #1 - What a Fun Ride! Volleyball Visits New York
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