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06
Mar 13

DETROIT, March 6, 2013 — The Department of English and Modern Languages at Marygrove College has just completed the judging for the third year of the Mary Helen Washington Writing Award Contest, offered in conjunction with its Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series (CAALS). Named after nationally-renowned scholar, editor, essayist, and teacher Dr. Mary Helen Washington, and supported through the generosity of series sponsors Lillian and Don Bauder, this annual contest asks students to write essays in response to the works of the CAALS guest artist. This year’s students were asked to write essays or poems in response to the works of this year's guest artist, National Book Award-winning poet Terrance Hayes.

Read more: Mary Helen Washington Writing Award Contest Winners Announced

26
Feb 13

Registration is going on now for fourteen new classes offering graduate credit 

DETROIT, Jan. 24, 2013 – Marygrove College today announced the addition of an exciting new complement of continuing education graduate recertification courses for teachers in cooperation with Learner’s Edge, Inc. (LEI).  The expanded course selection offers dynamic topics that are timely and relevant for educators, such as autism, bullying and addressing multiple intelligences.

The partnership promises to provide interesting, affordable, applicable and rigorous courses for classroom teachers, school administrators, school counselors, speech therapists, school nurses and other education professionals. These courses are designed to expand the knowledge base of professionals, enhance classroom instruction and ultimately increase student achievement, which is a foundational goal shared by both Marygrove and LEI.

Read more: Marygrove College Partners with Learner’s Edge, Inc. for Teacher Education

15
Feb 13

Campus memorial service will be held in the Sacred Heart Chapel in Marygrove’s Liberal Arts Building on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 4:30 pm.

jp song bw smallDr. Chae-Pyong (J.P.) Song
1960 - 2013
Last March, Dr. Chae-Pyong (J.P.) Song began his presentation at the Marygrove Academic Symposium with these words: “One way or the other we all cross borders; border-crossings entail arrivals and departures. But we all cross borders differently, so, we don’t experience arrivals and departures in the same way.”

Even in the last moments before he crossed his final border, J.P. taught us how to resist both physical and philosophical lines of demarcation; how to defy our own borders—just as he had throughout his life.

Today we are all grappling with his crossing in different ways, but those of us fortunate enough to have known him as a mentor, colleague and friend no doubt arrive at a similar destination: J.P. was a rare intellectual who found, and taught others to find, beauty and possibility in a world wrought with uncertainty.

After leaving Hwayang-myon, Yeosu, Korea in 1989, Dr. Song earned his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, concentrating on postcolonial Anglophone literature. He was coordinator of Marygrove’s Master of Arts in English program from 2007 through 2011 and has been a part of the department of English since 2001.

If we, no matter where we come from, could imagine others, and if we could place ourselves into the place of others, in other words, if we could exercise our empathetic imagination more willingly, the world could be a better place.

 Dr. Chae-Pyong Song

In addition to being a master teacher of 20th century English literature, postcolonial literature, globalization and literary theory, J.P. has translated over 200 literary works by Korean poets, many of which appear on his website, Korean Poetry in Translation. His work has also been published in The Korea Times, New Writing from Korea, Metamorphoses: Journal of Literary Translation, WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly, and Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture. Recently he, along with his friend and collaborator Dr. Anne Rashid, won the 40th Korean Literature Translation Awards for translating Kim Hye-soon's poems.

Read more: Dr. Chae-Pyong Song: A Life of Border-Crossing and Finding Beauty in Uncertainty

12
Feb 13

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Have you heard the news about Belle Isle? According to some Detroit high school science students, zombies have threatened to take it over, and only through their intensive lab experiments will it survive! At least that’s the storyline in their specially-created comic book fantasy, “Battle for Belle Isle,” 40 pages of educational curiosity and high jinx, courtesy of the Third 90 Network—a Michigan Colleges Foundation (MCF) program that pairs member colleges like Marygrove with urban high school students for hands-on learning in environmental science.

Their latest venture: partnering with the Belle Isle Conservancy to conduct environmental research in and around the Blue Heron Lagoon. Students are half-way through a year-long program that focuses primarily on water quality testing. Could their results hold the key to the island’s future? Maybe. But their findings are certain to teach them a bundle about the island’s ecosystem, and a whole lot more about themselves— and the way they like to learn.

The Institute for Arts Infused Education at Marygrove is helping to put a creative spin on this already innovative learning model, by teaching students to report their findings in a frame-by-frame comic book format, using colorful illustrations and thought bubbles to animate their lab reports. The results were compiled in a published keepsake comic book. And everyone involved had something to contribute.

Read more: Comics Capture the Art and Science of Learning on Our Beloved Belle Isle.

21
Dec 12

Misc photos of Marygrove -- old 069.jpgThe Monroe Advocate featured a small ad on Christmas Day, 1845 soliciting students to enroll in a new academy for educating girls in the Catholic faith. The former Frenchtown settlement named for President James Monroe in southeast Michigan was in the throes of a terribly harsh winter, rendering villagers house-bound. It was all they could do to keep their yule logs burning while preparing the traditional goose or turkey for their Christmas feasts.

The headline that appeared on the second page read: “Young Ladies’ Academy. Under the Direction of the Sisters of Providence” followed by a prospectus of the new school, founded for the purpose of educating the daughters of French-speaking families. It was the beginning of a new model from the soon-to-be renamed Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (IHM), a congregation of women who devised a standard of Catholic education which, over the course of the next 80 years, would evolve and grow to include Marygrove College in Detroit.

Read more: A Lesson in Stewardship. Staying True to the Mission of our Founders.

10
Dec 12

Marygrove College receives NEA grant to support

2013 Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series 

Detroit, MI, Dec. 10, 2012—National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman announced today that Marygrove College is one of 153 not-for-profit organizations nationwide to receive an NEA Challenge America Fast-Track grant.  Marygrove is recommended for a $10,000 grant to support the 2013 Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series.  Since its inception 24 years ago, the series has emphasized the importance of African American literature and fulfilled the community’s desire to hear nationally recognized African-American writers discuss their work before a diverse audience. Marygrove celebrates the 25th anniversary of the series in 2013 by featuring National Book Award winner Terrance Hayes, author of four collections of poetry (Muscular Music, Hip Logic, Wind in a Box, and Lighthead).  Each installment of this distinctive series has four components: a  class session conducted by the author for students from Marygrove College and Detroit area high schools, a VIP reception and dinner honoring the author, two writing contests, and the Lillian and Don Bauder Lecture—a reading open to the public. Hundreds of people—community leaders, students, and lovers of literature—from the metro area participate in each year’s event.  New this year is a fifth component: an art exhibit which expands awareness of the selected series authors and their influence on social and cultural environments.

Read more: Marygrove College receives NEA grant

29
Nov 12

dr fike 2012Listen to Dr. David Fike’s Nov. 28, 2012 interview on First Shift with Tony Trupiano, a talk show that airs on 1310 AM, WDTW.

 

 

 

 

19
Nov 12

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“Salute her towers, 
Her gleaming towers,
Ever aspiring to the sky…

It was a beautiful day in early June, 1929 at the newly renovated St. Mary’s Academy in Monroe. A thin ribbon of black smoke was discovered against the crisp blue sky, wafting from the east attic windows. The cast-iron gong was promptly sounded as the fire quickly grew out of control.

The Detroit News reported “300 girl students were at recess when the fire was discovered” and ran extras of the story as crowds gathered to watch the blaze. In the classic account, No Greater Service by Sister Rosalita Kelly (1892-1964), she details how Mother Domitilla Donohue (1863-1930) reminded the shaken congregation that “Buildings… could be restored, but the precious life of a child, never.” Thankfully, no one was hurt, but the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (IHM) and their devoted community were devastated by the fire that gutted their beloved academy,  “…mercilessly destroying the work of years.” 

Read more: Paving the way through brick and mortar and love: In thanksgiving of Marygrove women.

13
Nov 12

College ensures that finances will not be a barrier to graduation 

DETROIT, Nov.13, 2012 – Marygrove College is among only a handful of private colleges in Michigan that is taking action to support its students affected by new Pell Grant restrictions that went into effect in July, 2012. The College has committed to ensuring that ability to pay will not prevent students affected by the Pell Grant changes from graduating on time. A key part of this commitment comes from a generous matching gift pledge from new Marygrove Board of Trustees appointee and alumna Nan McDonough Geschke ’64, who has pledged to match, dollar for dollar, all alumni donations during Marygrove’s annual fall appeal.

The Pell Grant restrictions imposed by policymakers in Washington effectively “pulled the rug out” from students who, through no fault of their own, lost funding that they were depending on to complete their college education. New restrictions have increased the household income requirement, scales back the number of funded semesters and disproportionately affects lower income students. In fact, 150 Marygrove students were directly affected and were faced with putting their college dreams on hold because of an inability to pay. The College estimates it will cost between $1M and $1.5M over the next two years to carry out its mission to support these students. To this end, Marygrove has developed a funding strategy to help close the financial aid gap for students who will exhaust their Pell grant funding before completion of their degree. Through this strategy, Marygrove commits to fund the loss of Pell grants for up to the equivalent of two full time academic years, contingent upon students developing a degree completion Plan of Work with their academic advisor.

Read more: Marygrove College helps students affected by new Pell Grant legislation

08
Nov 12

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Unrelenting means not giving in. Not letting up. “Unrelenting” is a dance number choreographed by Marygrove College Dance alumna Zandria Lucas, ‘12 and recently performed on campus for visiting Fellows from the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance (KFLA) Forum 2012. Nine minutes of captivating movement told a story set to the lyrics “Will I?” from the Broadway musical, RENT. Nine minutes of perpetual motion penetrated the hearts and minds of its riveted audience.

“Will I lose my dignity?…Will I lose my tomorrow?”  The athleticism and strenuous requirements of the dance are second only to the unfolding story of community that was enacted—a story familiar to anyone who has ever had a conflict in life and sought to resolve it with the help of others— only to come out of it feeling exhilarated, proud and resilient. [Resilience.]

There were moments when the spectators in the studio were overcome with emotion. Beauty can do that. But the tears that day were a profound reaction to a message that was more like a whisper, eluding the ears and the brain and leaping straight to the heart. Even after several months, the dancers said they weep at times, too. It is a platform that is hard to put into words, because it really transcends them.  [Transcendence.]

Throughout the performance, Marygrove Dance Company Manager and Dance Recruitment Counselor Jonathon Cash watched intently from the back. He says Unrelenting is a work that is so difficult, many dancers simply do not have the physical strength to perform it. A recent Marygrove graduate himself, Cash currently scours the country for urban dance students willing and able to make their marks on this fine, established dance company.

Known for their poignancy, Marygrove’s Dance programs never disappoint. As the students’ bodies were rising and falling to their knees—rising and falling, it begged the question: how many times has Detroit risen from the ashes? “Unrelenting” peels back layers of triumphs and challenges, exposing what it’s like to build community, revealing what it takes to be an urban college. And like Detroit, Marygrove is transforming. [Transformation.]

Read more: Building our Leadership in Detroit. Tell the story. Tell the truth. Be Unrelenting.