Community

13
May 13

thumb jack shay warm brownDr. John E. ShayJust one week into what would become his nearly two-decade tenure as President of Marygrove College, Dr. John E. Shay, or “Jack,” as most of us call him, was asked what had originally attracted him to a small, liberal arts college in the Midwest. His answer perhaps mirrors the reasons many of us have found ourselves at Marygrove.

Marygrove was small. Intimate. It took care to cultivate relationships with its students. These things, he said in a 1980 interview, were precisely what made the college “an increasing asset.” These were the things that separated us from the “bureaucratization” found at so many other institutions.  

While larger, state-funded institutions may have seen Marygrove as what Dr. Shay called, “a very small frog in a very large pond,” he knew that our independence was what enabled us to “make judgments based on educational goals not politics and state budgets.” Other distinguishing features were Marygrove’s commitment to the liberal arts, and perhaps most importantly, our refusal to compromise our Catholic roots. These things, Dr. Shay believed, were what would ensure the success of Marygrove College.

Read more: Finding Innovation by Honoring Tradition: Remembering Former-President, Dr. John E. Shay

25
Mar 13

Marygrove College would like to congratulate and recognize all undergraduate students who have demonstrated academic excellence and outstanding leadership in 2013. For a complete listing of awards and recipients, browse the full 2013 Honors Convocation program below.

22
Mar 13

quadrafoil redtrees

Marygrove College is the proud recipient of a new scholarship for students who demonstrate exceptional dedication to advancing our community and enhancing our surrounding neighborhood through leadership—the kind of leadership that is founded in the mission of the institution. The Quigley- Doherty Family Endowed Scholarship will be presented at the Honors Convocation on March 24 in honor of Mary Catherine and David J. Doherty by their five children. Throughout their 48-year marriage, the couple dedicated their lives to service to others, and shared their faith and belief in community with all who knew them. 

After almost a decade of caring for their parents, Kathleen Doherty and her four brothers, Mike, Jim, John and Joe, spent a great deal of time cleaning out the family home to prepare it for sale. Kathleen couldn’t help but reminisce about the exceptional upbringing she and her four brothers were fortunate to receive.

Evidence of that fact was found throughout the home, in virtually every room: old photographs, letters, and mementos brought back memories and thoughts of childhood games, birthday parties, graduations and family weddings that will be filed away in her mind forever. One of the most curious things she discovered, over and over again, were keys—many, many keys in all shapes and sizes—neatly tucked in the backs of drawers and in cupboards.

Read more: New Quigley-Doherty Family Endowed Scholarship Celebrates a Legacy of Community

06
Mar 13

DETROIT, March 6, 2013 — The Department of English and Modern Languages at Marygrove College has just completed the judging for the third year of the Mary Helen Washington Writing Award Contest, offered in conjunction with its Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series (CAALS). Named after nationally-renowned scholar, editor, essayist, and teacher Dr. Mary Helen Washington, and supported through the generosity of series sponsors Lillian and Don Bauder, this annual contest asks students to write essays in response to the works of the CAALS guest artist. This year’s students were asked to write essays or poems in response to the works of this year's guest artist, National Book Award-winning poet Terrance Hayes.

Read more: Mary Helen Washington Writing Award Contest Winners Announced

15
Feb 13

Campus memorial service will be held in the Sacred Heart Chapel in Marygrove’s Liberal Arts Building on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 4:30 pm.

jp song bw smallDr. Chae-Pyong (J.P.) Song
1960 - 2013
Last March, Dr. Chae-Pyong (J.P.) Song began his presentation at the Marygrove Academic Symposium with these words: “One way or the other we all cross borders; border-crossings entail arrivals and departures. But we all cross borders differently, so, we don’t experience arrivals and departures in the same way.”

Even in the last moments before he crossed his final border, J.P. taught us how to resist both physical and philosophical lines of demarcation; how to defy our own borders—just as he had throughout his life.

Today we are all grappling with his crossing in different ways, but those of us fortunate enough to have known him as a mentor, colleague and friend no doubt arrive at a similar destination: J.P. was a rare intellectual who found, and taught others to find, beauty and possibility in a world wrought with uncertainty.

After leaving Hwayang-myon, Yeosu, Korea in 1989, Dr. Song earned his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, concentrating on postcolonial Anglophone literature. He was coordinator of Marygrove’s Master of Arts in English program from 2007 through 2011 and has been a part of the department of English since 2001.

If we, no matter where we come from, could imagine others, and if we could place ourselves into the place of others, in other words, if we could exercise our empathetic imagination more willingly, the world could be a better place.

 Dr. Chae-Pyong Song

In addition to being a master teacher of 20th century English literature, postcolonial literature, globalization and literary theory, J.P. has translated over 200 literary works by Korean poets, many of which appear on his website, Korean Poetry in Translation. His work has also been published in The Korea Times, New Writing from Korea, Metamorphoses: Journal of Literary Translation, WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly, and Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture. Recently he, along with his friend and collaborator Dr. Anne Rashid, won the 40th Korean Literature Translation Awards for translating Kim Hye-soon's poems.

Read more: Dr. Chae-Pyong Song: A Life of Border-Crossing and Finding Beauty in Uncertainty