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Detroit Studies

Detroit Studies

Contact
Thomas A. Klug, Ph.D.
Liberal Arts Building, Room 238
Phone: 313.927.1520
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Faculty
Mary Byrnes, Ph.D.
Rose DeSloover, MFA
Ellen Duncan, M.A.
Jane Hammang-Buhl, M.B.A.
Judith Heinen, Ph.D.
Thomas A. Klug, Ph.D.
Tal Levy, Ph.D.
Frank D. Rashid, Ph.D.
Dena Scher, Ph.D.

Programs Offered
Certificate in Detroit Studies

Defining Detroit (1)

Defining Detroit
The Marygrove College Institute for Detroit Studies, founded in 2001, promotes interdisciplinary study of the City of Detroit through academic credit and continuing education courses; online resources; lectures, readings, exhibits and performances; research activities and visiting scholar programs.

Literary Map of Detroit (24)

Literary Map of Detroit
This site identifies and describes locations with literary significance in and around Detroit and provides bibliographies of works by and about Detroit writers. Select from the list below. The editor is Frank D. Rashid: frashid@marygrove.edu.
Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall Centennial Calendar

Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall Centennial Calendar

Robert Hayden was born on August 4, 1913 in Detroit, Michigan, and Dudley Randall was born on January 14, 1914 in Washington DC, but moved to Detroit with his family on January 1, 1920.  They are two of the most renowned poets who grew up and began writing poetry in the Detroit communities known as Black Bottom and Paradise Valley.  Their literary legacies are grounded in Detroit, but their work extended beyond the temporal and spatial boundaries of their lives into the outer reaches of the world. 

Scheduled events:

October 10, 2013, 7:30 pm:  As part of Marygrove College’s Defining Detroit series, Prof. Melba Joyce Boyd and Prof. Frank Rashid will give a joint presentation on Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall.  Film clips and bio-critical discussion of the Detroit writers will trace the relationship between their lives and their writings. 7:30 pm, Marygrove College Theatre, 8425 West McNichols, Detroit. Free and open to the public.  Call 313-927-1383 for information.

Response of Marygrove College's Institute for Detroit Studies to Recent Coverage about Detroit

There has been a disturbing lack of context in recent coverage of developments in Detroit. Discussion of the installation of the Emergency Manager and the consequent filing for Chapter 9 bankruptcy too often has been limited to Detroit’s financial management. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the larger social and economic forces responsible for the city’s present crisis. This incomplete narrative leaves the mistaken impression that Detroiters—especially African American Detroiters—are responsible for the city’s financial collapse. 

 

Detroit Bibliography

Tom Klug has compiled a bibliography of Detroit books, articles and theses. A special thanks goes out to SBC and Michigan Colleges Foundation (MCF) for their support.

There are two ways to see it: the master bibliography which is large or by individual sections. The bibliographies are all .pdf's.

Bibliographies

Master Bibliography

Academic Offerings

CERTIFICATE IN DETROIT STUDIES
The undergraduate certificate in Detroit Studies consists of at least fifteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework devoted to analysis of metropolitan Detroit. Courses may include:

HIS 310: Metro Detroit through Three Centuries
POL/SW/SOC 385: Community and Organizational Change
IS 320: Detroit: An Interdisciplinary Seminar
ENG 333: Detroit in Literature
HIS/POL 496: Senior Research Seminar, Topics in Detroit History and Politics Other courses in development

COURSE DESCRIPTION
See appropriate sections of the catalog

Detroit Studies Overview

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Marygrove College Institute for Detroit Studies promotes interdisciplinary study of the City of Detroit through

  • academic credit and continuing education courses;
  • on-line resources;
  • lectures, readings, exhibits, and performances;
  • research activities and visiting scholar programs;
  • workshops, programs, and presentations held on campus and throughout the metropolitan area.

The Institute builds on Marygrove College’s mission to serve the people of metropolitan Detroit, on its location in the city, and on its strong relationship with different Detroit constituencies. The Institute seeks to broaden recogni­tion of Detroit’s contributions to American culture, interrogate standard definitions and popular versions of the city, and provide opportunity for cross-disciplinary analysis of issues important to the metropolitan area.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM

Defining Detroit

A series of lectures, readings, exhibits, and performances focusing on the City of Detroit. The series has brought to the campus well-known Detroit historians, writers, and artists, among them Joyce Carol Oates, Thomas J. Sugrue, Kevin Boyle, Heather Thompson, Philip Levine, Cholly Atkins, Naomi Long Madgett, and Lawrence Joseph.

Web Resources:

Defining Detroit Lecture Series

A list of previous lectures, readings, exhibits, and performances focusing on Detroit:

Punching the Clock
A public reading by poet Jim Daniels, Carnegie Mellon University
October 6, 2000, 8 p.m.

Dancing in the Street: Motown and the Cultural Politics of Detroit
A public lecture by cultural historian Suzanne E. Smith, George Mason University October 11, 2000, 8 p.m.

Defining Detroit Film Series

A list of previous films

Legacy in Bronze: the Sculpture of Sergio De Guisti

Produced by John Prusak and Kathryn Vander
February 15, 2009, 2:00 p.m.

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