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Categories starting with R

Reading & Literacy (5)

Reading & Literacy
The present program is designed to provide advanced study in theories of literacy development that will prepare its graduates to serve in leadership roles as reading teachers, reading specialists, or as reading clinicians in public, private, or parochial school settings. Flexibility within the program provides opportunities for students from differing backgrounds to acquire specific skills and knowledge to meet their individual needs.

Religious Studies (4)

Religious Studies
The Department of Religious Studies offers an undergraduate program that explores the religious dimension in human life and the role of religion in human affairs. The academic study of religion is integral to a liberal education. It provides you with an opportunity to discover the breadth of religious experience, sharpen your appreciation ofdiversity in human culture, and probe questions of human values. While we emphasize the Christian context, we encourage you to explore, understand and appreciate the variety of faiths and religious communities.

Items starting with R

Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall Centennial Calendar

Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall Centennial Calendar

Robert Hayden was born on August 4, 1913 in Detroit, Michigan, and Dudley Randall was born on January 14, 1914 in Washington DC, but moved to Detroit with his family on January 1, 1920.  They are two of the most renowned poets who grew up and began writing poetry in the Detroit communities known as Black Bottom and Paradise Valley.  Their literary legacies are grounded in Detroit, but their work extended beyond the temporal and spatial boundaries of their lives into the outer reaches of the world. 

Scheduled events:

October 10, 2013, 7:30 pm:  As part of Marygrove College’s Defining Detroit series, Prof. Melba Joyce Boyd and Prof. Frank Rashid will give a joint presentation on Robert Hayden and Dudley Randall.  Film clips and bio-critical discussion of the Detroit writers will trace the relationship between their lives and their writings. 7:30 pm, Marygrove College Theatre, 8425 West McNichols, Detroit. Free and open to the public.  Call 313-927-1383 for information.

Response of Marygrove College's Institute for Detroit Studies to Recent Coverage about Detroit

There has been a disturbing lack of context in recent coverage of developments in Detroit. Discussion of the installation of the Emergency Manager and the consequent filing for Chapter 9 bankruptcy too often has been limited to Detroit’s financial management. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the larger social and economic forces responsible for the city’s present crisis. This incomplete narrative leaves the mistaken impression that Detroiters—especially African American Detroiters—are responsible for the city’s financial collapse. 

 

Reading & Literacy Overview

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Masters of Education (M.Ed.) in Reading leading to a Reading Specialist [BR] Endorsement (K-12) program provides advanced study in theories of literacy development that prepares graduates to serve in leadership roles as reading teachers, reading specialists/literacy coaches, or reading clinicians in public, private, or parochial school settings.

Reading is viewed as a developmental process guided by the learner’s experiential background, self-perception, cultural identity, and the context for learning. Courses lead students to recognize and explore how issues of gender, ethnicity, multiculturalism, diversity, and global perspectives impacts learners in varied environments. These issues are addressed through instructional design, selection of evidenced based materials and media, and the use of multiple assessment measures for evaluation of student learning. Students receive practical experience in diagnosis and remediation of reading disabilities. 

Successful completion of the program prepares graduates to become more knowledgeable, skillful, capable leaders of reading and literacy development.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must meet all of the general graduate admission requirements (see the “Graduate Admissions” section of this catalog).  Applicants MUST have an elementary or secondary teaching certificate.

SPECIFIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

To complete the Master of Education in Reading leading to a Reading Specialist Endorsement [BR] (K-12), students must complete 30 credits of approved coursework including a 4 credit research project and a 4 credit clinical practicum.  

Required Courses (16 credits) 

RDG 509 Psychology of Literacy Development (3)

RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading (3) -OR-

RDG 559 Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction (3)

RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Language Arts (3)

RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development (3)

RDG 639 Research in Reading and Curriculum Development (4)

Courses for Reading Specialist Endorsement  (14 credits)

RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction (3)

RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction (3)

RDG 649 Seminar for Reading Specialists (3)

RDG 669 Clinical Practicum in Reading (4)

RDG 691 Independent Study: Reading & Technology (1)

The Reading Specialist Endorsement, granted by the State of Michigan after successful program completion and College recommendation, requires a passing score on the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Reading Specialist subject area test. For more information visit: 

http://www.mttc.nesinc.com/PDFs/MI_field092_SG.pdf

Reading & Literacy Overview

General Information
The M.Ed. graduate reading program has been in operation since 1966. Practicum experience is provided through the Marygrove College Learning Clinic, which has served the metropolitan area since 1951.

The present program is designed to provide advanced study in theories of literacy development that will prepare its graduates to serve in leadership roles as reading teachers, reading specialists, or as reading clinicians in public, private, or parochial school settings. Flexibility within the program provides opportunities for students from differing backgrounds to acquire specific skills and knowledge to meet their individual needs.

Reading is viewed as a developmental process guided by the learner’s experiential background, self-perception, cultural identity, and the context for learning. Courses recognize issues of gender, ethnicity, multiculturalism and global perspectives, and how the diversity of learners in multiple and varied environments impact learning. These issues are examined and addressed through instructional design, varied selection of materials and media, and the use of multiple assessment measures for evaluation of student learning. Students receive practical experiences in diagnosis and remediation of reading disabilities. Courses in other disciplines enable students to develop greater awareness of the impact of social contexts on learning.

Successful completion of the program prepares graduates to become more knowledgeable, skillful practitioners, and to become capable leaders of reading and literacy development.

Specific Program Information
Program applicants must already have an elementary or secondary teaching certificate to qualify for the endorsement. Completion of the Master Degree Reading Program is required in order to be eligible for the Reading Endorsement. Certified teachers may elect to take only the 18-hour Professional Certification Program. Final decisions regarding the applicability of specific courses are determined by the program coordinator.

Six graduate credits may be transferred provided they are not over 10 years old by the time the student completes the program, and the transfer course(s) is an equivalent of a course(s) required in the program.

Admissions Requirements
Applicants must meet all of the general graduate admission requirements (see the “Graduate Admissions” section of this catalog). Applicants MUST have an elementary or secondary teaching certificate.

Religious Studies Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Advocacy • Chaplaincy • Church Ministry • Community Service • Consultancy • Counseling • Religious Education
• Religious Journalism • Research • Teaching

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Department of Religious Studies offers an undergraduate program that explores the religious dimension in human life and the role of religion in human affairs. Our study is both historical and contemporary, in that we seek to understand religion today, in all Its variety, as an outgrowth of its past context. Our study is both comparative and critical, in that we seek to understand the actual impact of religion on society.

The academic study of religion is integral to a liberal education. It provides you with an opportunity to discover the breadth of religious experience, sharpen your appreciation of diversity in human culture, and probe questions of human values.

While we emphasize the Christian context, with particular attention to the Catholic tradition, we encourage you to explore, understand, and appreciate the variety of faiths and religious communities.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
Majors in art, child development, dance, education, history, music, psychology and social work find religious studies professionally enhancing. In fact, many students choose a double major, combining religious studies with another area to achieve their educational goals.

In addition to standard courses, you may wish to benefit from individualized directed study, independent study, field education, service learning, study abroad, and co-op learning. Students with appropriate professional experi­ence may receive limited credit for their prior experiential learning. Cumulative average of 3.0 (B) or better in the major or minor courses is required.

CAREER INFORMATION
Religious studies is an excellent foundation for a career in an education-related field, or in human services.

A concentration in religious studies is most often required for professional careers in church ministry, e.g. counsel­ing, youth ministry, social outreach, teaching, and worship.

Your studies will also prepare you for positions of lead­ership in education, health care, religious journalism, publishing and other community services.

You may wish to pursue graduate studies in pasto­ral ministry, religious education, religious studies or theology to qualify for positions in higher education, research, and consulting.

 

Religious Studies Course Descriptions

RS 150 Religion in the World                                                                             3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisite: None; Term I, II, Summer.
Exploration of religious practices as pervasive phe­nomena that have influenced human life and continue to play a significant role in all societies of the world.

RS 225A Development of Christianity: Beginnings to the Reformation       3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
Introductory overview of the history of the Christian church, with emphasis on the historical continuity and the cultural diversity of the Christian movement. Chris­tianity from the beginning through the period preceding the Reformation.

RS 225B Development of Christianity: Reformation to the Present              3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
Historical overview of the Christian movement from the upheaval of the Reformation, through the development of various Christian denominations, the worldwide spread of Christianity and the rise of the ecumenical movement, to present-day forms of Christian identity.

RS 150 Religion in the World                                                                             3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisite: None; Term I, II, Summer.
Exploration of religious practices as pervasive phe­nomena that have influenced human life and continue to play a significant role in all societies of the world.

RS 225A Development of Christianity: Beginnings to the Reformation        3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
Introductory overview of the history of the Christian church, with emphasis on the historical continuity and the cultural diversity of the Christian movement. Chris­tianity from the beginning through the period preceding the Reformation.

RS 225B Development of Christianity: Reformation to the Present              3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
Historical overview of the Christian movement from the upheaval of the Reformation, through the development of various Christian denominations, the worldwide spread of Christianity and the rise of the ecumenical movement, to present-day forms of Christian identity.

RS 226 Black Religion in the Americas                                                             3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisite: None. Term: annually
Historical overview of Black religious traditions in the modern West, with special attention to the USA and em­phasis on the emergence of Baptist, Methodist and Pentecostal traditions and the development of black forms of expression. Social movements such as the Haitian Revolution, slave revolts and the Civil War, the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the formation of the Black Muslims, Black Theology, and African struggles for independence.

RS 227    Religion in America                                                                            3 hours
General Education option. Prerequisite: none; Term: annually
Historical study of the development of various religious traditions in the United States, with emphasis on the major traditions of Christianity. Topics include the French, Spanish and English Catholic influence; the Puritans; the religious backgrounds of the founders; smaller churches and sects; the revival movement; the separation of church and state; civil religion; Pentecostalism; contemporary religious pluralism.

RS 228 Catholicism in the United States                                                          3 hours
Prerequisite: None
Historical survey of Roman Catholicism in the United States from the colonial period to the present. The course includes an introduction to the beliefs and practices of the Catholic tradition, with special emphasis on both the cultural and theological diversity within the tradition. The relationship of Roman Catholicism to other denominations and faith communities.

RS 230 Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures                                                3 hours
Prerequisite: None; Term: alternate years.
Survey of sacred literature commonly called the Old Testament by Christians. Selected readings from the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings introduce students to the cultural and historical background of the texts, as well as to their rich religious meaning.

RS 240 Introduction to the Christian Scriptures                                              3 hours
Prerequisite: None; Term: alternate years.
Survey of sacred literature commonly called the New Testament by Christians. Analysis of selected readings emphasizes diverse literary and theological themes and styles. Study of the cultural and historical influences on the texts leads to an appreciation of the diversity of sources and traditions.

RS 241 Christian Scriptures: Synoptic Gospels                                               3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
An introductory study of the general biblical sources and traditions behind the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. With emphasis on the texts of Matthew and Mark, we seek a literary and theological understanding and explore the relationship among these three gospels commonly known as the synoptic problem.

RS 242 Christian Scriptures: The Writings of Luke                                          3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
An introductory study of general biblical sources and traditions seeking a literary and theological understanding of the Gospel according to Luke and of the Acts of the Apostles.

RS 243 Christian Scriptures: Revelation and the Writings of John                3 hours
Prerequisite: None.
An introductory study of general biblical sources and traditions seeking a literary and theological understanding of the five works considered Johannine. Special attention is given to the apocalyptic literature and its symbolism.

RS 250 Jesus the Christ                                                                                      3 hours
Prerequisite: None; Term: annually.
Theological and historical analysis of the interpretation of Jesus of Nazareth as the Christ of faith, ranging from his contemporaries to the present.

RS 265 Worship in the African-American Tradition                                          3 hours
Prerequisite: none.|
Study of various art forms and ritual expressions that arise out of the Black diaspora. Historical analysis of slave worship, the emergence of distinctive call-response and preaching styles, the emphasis on percussion and rhythm, and the continuous effort to relate worship to the world of work, the fight for freedom, and the struggle to survive.

RS 291 Independent Study                                                                                 1-3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105, permission of the instructor, by arrangement with department.
Focused study of student-selected topic in consultation with instructor.

RS 310 Christianity and Atheism                                                                        3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105.
Examination of classical and modern forms of faith and unbelief; attitudes, circumstances, and reasons that sup­port Christian faith, agnosticism, or atheism.

RS 326 African-American Religious Thought                                                    3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105; Term: alternate years.
A historical overview of the sources and development of African-American religious thought, including the distinc­tive features, most original insights, and significant contemporary themes and concerns of Black Theology.

RS 330 Religion and Science at the Frontiers                                                   3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105; recommended: 1 science/lab course‚ 1 RS course; Fee: yes
This multi-disciplinary course examines the past and present relationships between religion and the sciences. Topics include: models and paradigms; creation; evolution; consciousness; freedom; purpose; values. You will ex­plore seeming conflicts and contradictions‚ seek possible resolutions‚ and discover how both religion and science‚ though distinctive‚ may complement one another.

RS 360 Christianity, Ecumenism, and Inter-Religious Encounter                   3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105
Investigation into the origins and distinctive features of various Christian denominations, including the movement toward unity, recent efforts toward cooperation among various church communities, and the new horizon of dialog and mutual learning with other world religions. Writing intensive course.

RS 367 Religion and Politics in the 21st Century                                             3 hours
Prerequisites: Introductory course(s) in social science and religious studies; ENG 108, LS 105
With an initial focus on the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and its changing application over the last few decades, this course explores the relationships between religion and politics in the USA as well as in other cultures and societies.

RS 375 Native American Spirituality                                                                  3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105.
In this course, you will explore how Native people were able to blend Christianity and their Native beliefs into something that represents both belief systems. You will study some of the ceremonies and ancient creation sto­ries that contributed to the spiritual and intellectual growth of the Americas. You will learn how the Native American concepts of respect for everything in nature, with harmony as the ultimate goal, are expressed in everyday life.

RS 380 Religion and Society                                                                               3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105.
Focus on the theological bases of social ethics, how social ethics is articulated in sacred writings, and on the moral dimensions of controversial issues and the decision-making process. Writing intensive course.

RS 381 Problems in Christian Social Ethics                                                      1-6 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105
Study of selected issues and problems in the context of Christian ethical convictions. Topics vary. A maximum of six credits may be earned in combination of different modules.

RS 384 Faith and Human Development                                                              3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, PSY 205.
Investigation of the process of faith development as it integrates with the psychological, moral and cognitive stages of development within each person. Each stage of the life cycle is examined with implications of this devel­opmental process for religious education. Writing intensive course.

RS 386 Religious Education and Ministry: Field Experience                           1-9 hours            
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105, by arrangement with the department.
Specialized projects and/or in-service experience in religious education and ministry.

RS 395 Directed Study                                                                                         1-3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, LS 105, permission of the instructor.
Directed study of a topic in an area of the student’s choice.

RS 491 Independent Study                                                                                  1-3 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, by arrangement with the department.
In-depth advanced research on student-selected topic in consultation with instructor.

RS 496 Senior Research Project                                                                         3-4 hours
Prerequisites: Religious Studies major; by arrangement with the department; completion of 21 credit hours in religious studies, including all other major requirements.
Advanced investigation of a significant issue in Religious Studies. Formal presentation of findings to students and faculty. May be done departmentally or interdepartmentally.

Reading Endorsement (K-12)

The Reading Endorsement requires completion of a minimum of 32 credit hours in Reading (RDG) courses and graduate level Education (EDU) courses, and can only be offered to those with a M.Ed. The endorsement, granted by the State of Michigan, also requires a passing score on the subject area test of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC).

Courses for completion of the M.Ed. Degree with a Reading Endorsement must include:

A. READING COURSES
RDG 509 Psychology of Literacy Development
RDG 519 Language and Cognitive Development
* RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
RDG 559 Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction
* RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Language Arts
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction
RDG 649 Seminar for Reading Specialists
RDG 669 Clinical Practicum in Reading
RDG 691 Independent Study: Issues in
Literacy Development

* Appropriate undergraduate courses may be substituted. Other courses may be substituted with permission of the program coordinator.

B. EDUCATION COURSES
Select two courses from the following:
EDU 524 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 530 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 537 Curriculum Theory and Development
EDU 547 General Secondary Methods
EDU 556 Language Development and Disorders
EDU 640 Technology Tools for Teachers

STATE OF MICHIGAN APPROVED COURSES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH 2000 READING REQUIREMENTS FOR PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION

A. ELEMENTARY
RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development
RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction
OR RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction

B. SECONDARY
RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading
RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development

Religious Studies Minor

The minor in religious studies requires 20 credit hours in religious studies, including:

A. Required Courses:

RS 150            Religion in the World

RS 250            Jesus the Christ

B. One course from among:

RS 310            Christianity and Atheism

RS 326            African-American Religious Thought  

RS 360            Christian Diversity, Ecumenism, and Inter-Religious Encounter

C. One course from among:

RS 230            Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures

RS 240            Introduction to the Christian Scriptures

RS 241            Christian Scriptures: Synoptic Gospels

RS 242            Christian Scriptures: The Writings of Luke

RS 243            Christian Scriptures: Revelation and the Writings of John

Reading & Literacy Course Descriptions

RDG 509: Psychology of Literacy Development   3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines, explores, and investigates psychological variables and the behaviors involved in reading and learning to read.  The course analyzes task and milieu conditions which facilitate reading skill acquisition, and examines teaching strategies in relation to research findings about literacy learning.

RDG 557: Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course specifically addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of intermediate and secondary school students with reading problems.  Students in this course analyze the variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures across content areas.  Teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills, content reading and writing proficiency of all students are presented with strategies for supporting literacy instruction across the curriculum.

RDG 559: Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the history, rationale, and criteria for selection and evaluation of classic, contemporary, culturally diverse literature for children and young adults.  Specific strategies for culturally relevant literature-based reading instruction are presented to foster literacy development and promote an enjoyment of literature.

RDG 564: Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course presents criteria and procedures for examining reading, writing, listening, viewing, and speaking processes. Developmentally appropriate teaching strategies and materials supportive of reading development are explored. This course also examines research and management of classroom reading programs, grades K-8.

RDG 567: The Writing Process in Literacy Development 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course presents theories of how to teach writing skills examining the connection between reading and writing performance in literacy development. This course also examines skills that support writing processes and identifies effective strategies for cross-curricular integration of creative and informational writing.

RDG 609: Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines identification of reading disabilities and possible causative factors through the use of formal and informal tests and case study methods. This course develops a comprehensive testing vocabulary in order to administer, interpret, and evaluate diagnostic tests.

RDG 619: Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines implementation considerations, management systems, and classroom organization of developmental and remedial reading programs, grades K-8. Advanced skills are developed for selecting, designing and evaluating strategies for meeting specific reading objectives. Direction is given on prescribing and modifying for differentiated instruction, and supporting content area reading instruction.

RDG 639: Research in Reading and Curriculum Development 4 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course provides opportunities for research that focuses on effective literacy instruction and factors involved in successful curriculum development of school-wide reading programs.  The course covers formal and informal research techniques. Students will design, conduct, and present a research project.

RDG 649: Seminar for Reading Specialists 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course addresses reading consultation responsibilities. These include coordinating developmental and remedial programs, facilitating teacher and staff development, writing program, funding and research proposals, conducting workshops, and simulating interactions.

RDG 669: Clinical Practicum in Reading   4 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course explores advanced diagnosis and remediation in a clinical setting, including on-going assessment and modification of teaching strategies.  Course material covers learning conditions in relation to pupil performance, and methodologies for reporting findings and recommendations.  NOTE: Reading specialist endorsement requires that the student must work with elementary and secondary age pupils.

RDG 691: Independent Study: Reading & Technology 1-3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Independent Study involves instruction with a designated faculty member outside of regular class settings.  A proposal describing the scope, context and outcomes of the independent study course must be made and accepted by the Dean’s office for independent study to occur.  An explanation of Independent Study parameters and processes can be found in the “Academic Policies” section of this catalog.

Reading & Literacy Course Descriptions

(*See “Teacher Certification” section, for EDU course descriptions)

RDG 509 Psychology of Literacy Development 3 hours
This course describes the variables and the behaviors involved in reading and learning to read; it investigates task and milieu conditions which facilitate reading skill acquisition; and examines teaching strategies in relation to research findings.

RDG 519 Language and Cognitive Development 3 hours
This course explores theories of language and cognitive development; language growth; significance of home, culture and early school environment; relationship of linguistics to reading and speaking processes; readiness and implementation for beginning reader; procedures for teaching bilingual children.

RDG 557 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading 3 hours
This course specifically addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of intermediate and secondary school students with reading problems; analyzes the variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures in various content areas; presents teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills, content reading and writing proficiency of all students; and explores strategies for supporting literacy instruction across the curriculum.

RDG 559 Literature Based Approaches to Reading Instruction 3 hours
This course examines the history, description, rationale, and criteria for selection and evaluation of classic, contemporary, and culturally diverse literature for children and young adults. This course also presents specific strategies for using culturally conscious literature in literature based reading instruction, and explores a variety of strategies to foster literacy development and promote an enjoyment of literature.

RDG 564 Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts 3 hours
This course presents criteria and procedures for reading, writing, listening, viewing, and speaking processes, and examines teaching strategies and materials which are consonant with human growth and development. This course also discusses research and management of classroom reading programs, grades K-8.

RDG 567 The Writing Process in Literacy Development 3 hours
This course presents theories of how to teach writing skills and examines the connection between reading and writing performance in literacy development. This course also explores and examines skills that support writing processes and identifies effective strategies for cross-curricular integration of creative and informational writing.

RDG 609 Diagnostic Techniques in Reading Instruction 3 hours
This course examines identification of reading disabilities and possible causative factors through the use of formal and informal tests and case study methods. This course also develops a comprehensive testing vocabulary in order to administer, interpret, and evaluate tests.

RDG 619 Prescriptive Techniques for Reading Instruction 3 hours
This course examines the implementation of developmental and remedial reading programs, management systems, and classroom organization, grades K-8. This course also develops advanced skills in selecting, designing and evaluating strategies and materials for the teaching of specific objectives in reading; in prescribing and modifying for differentiated instruction; and in applying reading instruction to content areas.

RDG 639 Research in Reading and Curriculum Development 4 hours
This course provides opportunities for research that focuses on effective literacy instruction, and factors involved in successful curriculum development in school-wide reading programs. This course also covers techniques for formal and informal research. Students will design, conduct, and present a research project.

RDG 649 Seminar for Reading Specialists 3 hours
This course addresses reading consultant responsibilities, including: coordinating developmental and remedial programs, facilitating teacher and staff development, writing proposals, conducting workshops, and simulating interactions.

RDG 669 Clinical Practicum in Reading 4 hours
This course explores advanced diagnosis and remediation in a clinical setting, including: on-going assessment and modification of teaching strategies and conditions in relation to pupil performance and attitudes, and reporting of findings and recommendations to others. NOTE: Reading major endorsement requires that the student must work with elementary and secondary age pupils.

RDG 691 Independent Study: Issues in Literacy Development 1-3 hours
An explanation of Independent Study’s can be found in the “Academic Policies” section of this catalog.

RDG 500 Foundations of Reading & Literacy

This course provides teachers with a comprehensive knowledge base in the reading process and facility with the most effective instructional and assessment techniques. Based on research with internationally recognized reading specialists, this course enables participants to identify effective theories and principles for teaching reading in the five major components of the reading process — literacy, phonemic awareness and phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension — and to apply the most effective instructional plans, methods and resources in their practice. In addition, the course focuses on methods for assessing reading progress in individuals and groups and ideas for differentiating instruction for diverse learners.

RDG 510 Reading Diagnosis & Differentiated Instruction For Diverse Learners

This course examines formal and informal literacy assessments; identifies appropriate strategies for remediation of reading disabilities; and plans differentiated instructional methods with emphasis on phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary. This course also develops a comprehensive assessment vocabulary in order to administer, interpret, and evaluate assessment instruments. Field experience and a case study component will demonstrate integration of course knowledge and classroom practices.

Request More Information about the Reading 510 Program

RDG 610 Reading in the Content Areas

This course focuses on ways to integrate effective reading strategies into all subject areas of the curriculum. Participants learn strategies for supporting the comprehension of nonfiction texts and the development of content-area vocabulary, as well as motivational techniques for reluctant learners.

RDG 615 The Reading & Writing Connection

This course focuses on the writing process and its role in literacy development. As students become fluent readers, they need to balance their literacy time with various types of writing. Participants apply research-based instructional strategies to integrate writing into all subject areas. Specific techniques such as mini-lessons, error analysis, conferencing and using portfolios are addressed. Each step of the writing process is examined as participants design units of study for their teaching practice.

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