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Categories starting with E

Educational Leadership (1)

A Master of Arts in Educational Leadership will provide students with advanced knowledge and skills in managing and leading the modern school. This program focuses on the principal as the instructional leader and the chief architect of change in the school. In addition to a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of administrative and management theory and capacity building, students will be introduced to the concept of the principal as change agent. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring organizational development, assessment, change skills and identifying and working with the issues facing the urban school administrator.
Educational Leadership

Educational Leadership (1)

A Master of Arts in Educational Leadership will provide students with advanced knowledge and skills in managing and leading the modern school. This program focuses on the principal as the instructional leader and the chief architect of change in the school. In addition to a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of administrative and management theory and capacity building, students will be introduced to the concept of the principal as change agent. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring organizational development, assessment, change skills and identifying and working with the issues facing the urban school administrator.
Educational Leadership

Educational Technology (1)

Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The technology revolution has touched all aspects of teaching and administration in today’s schools. As a result educators—teachers, professionals, and administrators alike—must keep up with changes and make choices among an ever expanding array of technology resources.
Educational Technology

Educational Technology (1)

Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The technology revolution has touched all aspects of teaching and administration in today’s schools. As a result educators—teachers, professionals, and administrators alike—must keep up with changes and make choices among an ever expanding array of technology resources.
Educational Technology

English, Graduate (2)

The Master of Arts in English is designed to provide both theoretical and practical foundations for teaching English in community colleges or high schools. It is a 33-credit-hour program whose courses are offered in the evening and on weekends. Two required core courses will give a solid base for graduate English studies, while two 600-level advanced seminars will offer rigorous opportunities to explore various disciplinary topics in depth. The flexibly conceived Masters Project will provide an opportunity for students to further explore their topic of interest in literary works or in teaching composition.
English, Graduate

Early Childhood Education (14)

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) minor is done in conjunction with the Teacher Certification Program, along with a major leading to Elementary Level teacher certification (Language Arts, Integrated Science, Math, or Social Studies). The successful graduate will qualify for the endorsement in Early Childhood Education being added to an Elementary Level (K-8) teaching certificate. This added endorsement recognizes the graduate as a specialist for Kindergarten and primary level teaching in elementary schools.
Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education - Student Resources (2), Early Childhood Education - Specific Information (4)

Economics (3)

The Department of Economics offers courses to meet general education requirements and to serve business majors, students who major in different disciplines in the social sciences, and economics minors.
Economics

Education (4)

The Education Unit, in cooperation with other academic units, prepares students for teaching at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. Entrance into the College does not guarantee admission to the Teacher Certification (TCCERT) Program. Students must make a separate application to the Teacher Certification Program. Prior to admission to the TCCERT program, undergraduates will be assigned an advisor who will assist in planning the sequence of certification courses. Students must have a certifiable major and minor and adhere to the certification requirements as listed below in order to obtain teacher certification.
Education

English, Undergraduate (6)

You will be interested in an English major if you want a career in teaching, journalism, law, or business. A major in English will help you become an accomplished writer and critical thinker with skills valued and needed in many professions.
English, Undergraduate

Environmental Studies (3)

The Environmental Science Department has three major objectives: (1) to provide a strong environmental science major within a liberal arts framework for those entering environment-related jobs in industry or the government or preparing for graduate work; (2) to provide cognate backgrounds in environmental science for science educators and others who may require this major; (3) to provide non-science majors with sufficient background to understand advances in technology, environmental implications of new laws and health advances.
Environmental Studies

Ethnic / Cultural Studies (6)

Marygrove College offers minors in Ethnic/Cultural Studies and African-American Studies and certificates in African-American Studies and Women’s Studies designed to foster inter-ethnic understanding and to provide a sound basis for educating students and interested others on the activities, contributions, and impact of African-Americans, Native-Americans, Asians, Arabs, Latinos, and Women on the Americas. This is essential in preparing students for a complex world, given the growing importance of diversity in the workplace and in society at large. The two minors and two certificate programs, though multi-disciplinary in nature, are offered through the Social Science Department.
Ethnic / Cultural Studies

Items starting with E

Ethnic/Cultural Studies Minor

Consisting of survey courses in African-American, Native American, Women, Latin American, Asian and Arab studies, this program offers a broad-based curriculum in general studies in which students will learn essential information to help them understand diversity and multicultural environments.

The requirements for an Ethnic/Cultural Studies minor are 24 credit hours.
A. Required Core Courses

POL/SOC 307 Introduction to Ethnic/Cultural Studies
SOC 368 Inequality in America: Class, Gender, and Race
HIS 311 History of Blacks in America to 1865 -OR-
HIS 312 History of Blacks in America since 1865
HIS 314 Native American History
HUM 330 Arab and Asian Humanities
HUM 332 Latin American Humanities
PSY 320 Psychology of Women

B. Elective Courses
Select one elective
AH 350 Black Art
DAN 379 Ethnic Dance
ENG 222 Introduction to African- American Literature
ENG 370 Literature by Women
GEO 301 Cultural Geography
HIS 335 Women in U. S. History
HIS 359 History of Civil Rights
HUM 150 Contemporary Cultural Studies
HUM 333A African Humanities I
HUM 333B African Humanities II
IS 324 Social Justice Seminar: Women’s Issues
PHL 276 Critical Thinking: Voices of the African Diaspora
POL 309 Ethnicity in Urban America
POL 320 African-American Politics
PSY/SOC 360 Social Psychology
RS 150 Religion in the World
RS 226 Black Religion in the Americas
SOC 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity
SOC 318 Global Women’s Issues and Policies
SOC 345 Sociology of the Family

 

Consisting of survey courses in African-American, Native American, Women, Latin American, Asian and Arab studies, this program offers a broad-based curriculum in general studies in which students will learn essential information to help them understand diversity and multicultural environments.

The requirements for an Ethnic/Cultural Studies minor are 24 credit hours.

A. Required Core Courses
POL/SOC 307 Introduction to Ethnic/Cultural Studies
SOC 368 Inequality in America: Class, Gender, and Race
HIS 311 History of Blacks in America to 1865 -OR-
HIS 312 History of Blacks in America since 1865
HIS 314 Native American History
HUM 330 Arab and Asian Humanities
HUM 332 Latin American Humanities
PSY 320 Psychology of Women

B. Elective Courses
Select one elective
AH 350 Black Art
DAN 379 Ethnic Dance
ENG 222 Introduction to African- American Literature
ENG 370 Literature by Women
GEO 301 Cultural Geography
HIS 335 Women in U. S. History
HIS 359 History of Civil Rights
HUM 150 Contemporary Cultural Studies
HUM 333A African Humanities I
HUM 333B African Humanities II
IS 324 Social Justice Seminar: Women’s Issues
PHL 276 Critical Thinking: Voices of the African Diaspora
POL 309 Ethnicity in Urban America
POL 320 African-American Politics
PSY/SOC 360 Social Psychology
RS 150 Religion in the World
RS 226 Black Religion in the Americas
SOC 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity
SOC 318 Global Women’s Issues and Policies
SOC 345 Sociology of the Family

English Overview

CAREER INFORMATION
As an English major, you will find that all areas of the professional world need your skills and knowledge. With this major, you can plan a career in education, law, journalism, technical writing, public relations, advertising, speech writing, grant writing, or publish­ing. Although many English majors choose education or communications, the fields of business, medicine, law, industry, and government also need people who can communicate ideas, analyze information, and solve problems. These are the skills you develop in our English programs.

GENERAL INFORMATION|
The general English major will help to develop your abilities to examine the world responsibly, engage with diverse voices and experiences, and understand the purposes of storytelling and creative expression. The English pro­gram offers a variety of options to help you become a more accomplished writer, reader, and critical thinker with skills valued and needed in any profession.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
As a student in this department’s program, you will have a core of required courses, and may also select from a variety of courses in literature, writing, and film. You may complete this major as a day or evening student.

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in English (36 required credit hours) is designed for students who want a sound background in literature and writing as preparation for graduate study or for your individual career goals.

The English major for students interested in secondary education consists of a core of required literature and writing courses, and a variety of English electives that complete the 36 re­quired credit hours. You must combine this major with a certifiable minor.

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Language Arts is designed for those students interested in elementary teaching (39 required credit hours). This is a group major in which you have a core of literature and writ­ing courses, and then choose from many courses in English and other courses as noted in the Language Arts section.

A minor in English (23 required credit hours) or language arts (26 required credit hours) provides students in any major with a foundation in literature, humanities, and oral and written communications.

Students interested in writing may select from a variety of writing courses, including such offerings as creative writing, professional writing, and writing online, and can work with their advisors to tailor a writing concentration specific to their interests.

Only courses in which the student has attained a grade of C or better can be counted toward a major or a minor in all English or Language Arts courses.

 

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series
Every spring the English and Modern Languages Department brings a noted author to the campus for a public reading or lecture. Students may take ENG 320, a course in the guest author’s works, and at­tend a master class with the author. Previous guests in the quarter-century-long series have been Gloria Naylor, Mary Helen Washington, John Edgar Wideman, Octavia Butler, Jamaica Kincaid‚ Rita Dove, Virginia Hamilton, Ernest J. Gaines, Merle Collins, Lucille Clifton, Toi Derricotte, Edwidge Danticat, Cornelius Eady, Pearl Cleage, Ed­ward P. Jones, Charles Johnson, Marilyn Nelson, Samuel R. Delany, Elizabeth Alexander, Walter Mosley, Harryette Mullen, Paul Beatty, and Terrance Hayes. As an English major or minor you will have the oppor­tunity to serve on the host committee for this event.

The Amy S. McCombs and Frederick P. Currier Writing Awards
These are cash prizes given annually to students whose essays, fiction, or poetry best express the spirit of the work of the visiting author in the Contemporary American Authors Lecture Series.

The Dr. Barbara Johns, IHM Award
This annual award is presented at the College’s annual Honors Convocation to recognize students whose work demonstrates the highest standards of scholarly excellence and appreciation of the powers of language.

The Dr. Lynne Schaeffer Award
This annual award is presented to recognize an outstanding essay written by an undergraduate English and Modern Languages student.

The DeVlieg Foundation English and Modern Languages Scholarship
This annual scholarship award is given to a promising first- or second-year student in English and Modern Languages.

Sigma Tau Delta
Alpha Zeta Zeta is Marygrove’s chapter of Sigma Tau Delta‚ the International English Honor Society. Its members sponsor poetry readings and book drives, host coffee-houses, and support English and Modern Languages Department activities like the Contem­porary American Authors Lecture Series. Sigma Tau Delta also offers an annual scholarship to a sopho­more, junior, or senior who is majoring or minoring in English or language arts. To be eligible for the scholar­ship, students must be registered for at least 9 credit hours and have a cumulative grade average of 3.5.

Study Abroad
Under the guidance of an English and Modern Lan­guages Department faculty member, students have op­portunities to take travel seminars in which they study the literature and culture of other countries, then make a ten-day on-site visit over spring break. Students also have the opportunity to spend an entire semester on-site studying the literature and culture of another country. Marygrove English majors have studied in Australia, England, France, and Scotland.

Research and Publication Opportunities
Students have opportunities to work closely with professors on research and publications, and to publish their work in course anthologies and other outlets connected with coursework in the department. Students have many opportunities to present their research at national, regional, and local conferences including the College's annual academic symposium named in honor of our late colleague, Dr. Chaepyong Song.

The Literary Map of Detroit
In partnership with the Marygrove Institute for Detroit Studies, faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the Marygrove English and Modern Languages Depart­ment develop and maintain this online resource to highlight Detroit-area literary sites. Visit the map at: http://www.marygrove.edu/ids/Detroit_literary_map.asp.

Annual Department Events
The English and Modern Languages Department sponsors a variety of social and academic events for students throughout the year. You will have the opportunity to join with department faculty and other students at an annual welcome-back event in the fall, an annual party at the end of the winter semester, special workshops, and colloquia designed specifically for the needs and interests of our majors and minors. Each year, the English and Modern Languages Department co-hosts Dramafest, an evening of staged readings of original dramatic works written and performed by Marygrove faculty, students, and staff, as well as playwrights and actors from the community.

 

Ethnic/Cultural Studies Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS

Each minor and certificate enhances the career preparation for social work, psychology, social science, allied health and business majors.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Marygrove College offers minors in Ethnic/Cultural Studies and African-American Studies and certificates in African-American Studies and Women’s Studies designed to foster inter-ethnic understanding and to provide a sound basis for educating students and interested others on the activities, contributions, and impact of African-Americans, Native-Americans, Asians, Arabs, Latinos, and Women on the Americas. This is essential in preparing students for a complex world, given the growing importance of diversity in the workplace and in society at large. The two minors and two certificate programs, though multi-disciplinary in nature, are offered through the Social Science Department. Ethnic and Cultural Studies offers both day and evening courses.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

The minor in Ethnic/Cultural Studies requires a minimum of 24 credit hours, including five (5) core courses and three (3) elective courses.

The minor in African-American Studies requires a minimum of 24 credit hours, including five (5) core courses, and three (3) electives courses.

The certificate programs in African-American Studies and in Women’s Studies require 18 credit hours each. The African-American Studies certificate requires five (5) core courses and one (1) elective. The Women’s Studies certificate requires three (3) core courses and three (3) electives. At the conclusion of your coursework, apply to the Social Science Group Major coordinator for the certificate.

The two minors and both certificates recommend two pre-requisites: LS 105 and ENG 108

CAREER INFORMATION

The two minors and two certificates can each serve as a useful background for individuals whose careers may involve extensive contact with diverse communities. Knowledge of various cultures improves career flex­ibility. Given the increasing diversity of the workplace, employers hire employees whose knowledge of ethnic­ity can benefit the organization by facilitating positive work relationships and improving productivity. An Ethnic/Cultural Studies program adequately prepares students to become these employees. If your major is social work, psychology, social science, allied health, or business, you can enhance and combine your ca­reer preparation with a minor in Ethnic/Cultural Studies or African- American Studies or a certificate in either African-American Studies or Women’s Studies.

 

Early Childhood Education Overview Bachelor of Arts, Early Childhood Education Minor
The Early Childhood Education (ECE) minor is done in conjunction with the Teacher Certification Program, along with a major leading to Elementary Level teacher certification (Language Arts, Integrated Science, Math, or Social Studies). The successful graduate will qualify for the endorsement in Early Childhood Education being added to an Elementary Level (K-8) teaching certificate. This added endorsement recognizes the graduate as a specialist for Kindergarten and primary level teaching in elementary schools.

BACHELOR OF ARTS, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION MINOR Plus TEACHER CERTIFICATION (ZA endorsement)
A. General Education Requirements
See Undergraduate Catalog

B. Required Major Courses - Certifiable Major
Student must complete a certifiable elementary major from the list in the Teacher Certification section of this catalog, and must fulfill all Teacher Certification Program requirements. Early Childhood Education minor coursework is listed below.

C. Required Courses for Early Childhood Education Minor
EDU 205 Children's Literature
ECE 223 Young Child Guidance and Parent Advocacy
ECE 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics
ECE 333 Math/Science Methods for Early Childhood
ECE 375 Literacy Methods for Early Childhood Education
ECE 433 Young Child Assessment
ECE 456 Language Development and Disorders
ECE 499 Student Teaching: Preschool

D. Early Childhood Electives
(Select minimum of one course)
ECE 326 Administration of Developmental Centers
-OR-
BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle

E. Required Elementary Level Professional Education Courses:***
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 240 Developmental Psychology
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 275 Foundations of American Education
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 344*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Mathematics
EDU 348 Teaching Writing and Speaking in the Elementary and Secondary Classroom
EDU 354*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
EDU 364A*** Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
EDU 364B*** Methods in Elementary Reading: Practicum
EDU 374*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Science
EDU 499 Student Teaching

***Generally offered once per academic year

Students must also complete each field-based experience and practicum as required in Professional Education Courses. Additional courses and requirements for admission and completion may be required with changes in Divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Bachelor of Arts, Early Childhood Education Minor
The Early Childhood Education (ECE) minor is done in conjunction with the Teacher Certification Program, along with a major leading to Elementary Level teacher certification (Language Arts, Integrated Science, Math, or Social Studies). The successful graduate will qualify for the endorsement in Early Childhood Education being added to an Elementary Level (K-8) teaching certificate. This added endorsement recognizes the graduate as a specialist for Kindergarten and primary level teaching in elementary schools.

BACHELOR OF ARTS, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION MINOR Plus TEACHER CERTIFICATION (ZA endorsement)
A. General Education Requirements
See Undergraduate Catalog

B. Required Major Courses - Certifiable Major
Student must complete a certifiable elementary major from the list in the Teacher Certification section of this catalog, and must fulfill all Teacher Certification Program requirements. Early Childhood Education minor coursework is listed below.

C. Required Courses for Early Childhood Education Minor
EDU 205 Children's Literature
ECE 223 Young Child Guidance and Parent Advocacy
ECE 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics
ECE 333 Math/Science Methods for Early Childhood
ECE 375 Literacy Methods for Early Childhood Education
ECE 433 Young Child Assessment
ECE 456 Language Development and Disorders
ECE 499 Student Teaching: Preschool

D. Early Childhood Electives
(Select minimum of one course)
ECE 326 Administration of Developmental Centers
-OR-
BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle

E. Required Elementary Level Professional Education Courses:***
EDU 203 The Teaching Profession
EDU 240 Developmental Psychology
EDU 241 Educational Psychology
EDU 275 Foundations of American Education
SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner
EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management
EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom
EDU 344*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Mathematics
EDU 348 Teaching Writing and Speaking in the Elementary and Secondary Classroom
EDU 354*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Social Studies
EDU 364A*** Methods in Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts
EDU 364B*** Methods in Elementary Reading: Practicum
EDU 374*** Methods for Teaching Elementary School Science
EDU 499 Student Teaching

***Generally offered once per academic year

Students must also complete each field-based experience and practicum as required in Professional Education Courses. Additional courses and requirements for admission and completion may be required with changes in Divisional policies and/or State of Michigan certification rules.

Economics Overview

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Department of Economics offers courses to meet general education requirements and to serve business majors‚ students who major in different disciplines in the social sciences‚ and economics minors.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

The minor in economics provides students who major in other disciplines a broader perspective. This minor is highly recommended for business majors and majors in other social sciences. The economics minor consists of a minimum of 20 credit hours in economics.

 

 

Environmental Studies Overview

CAREER INFORMATION

In lieu of needed changes in the economy, energy production, business practices, environmental issues and governmental programs and incentives, “Green Jobs” have become a common phase in the job market.  People with an interdisciplinary background ranging from science, business, economic, and politics are going to be needed to examine and create solutions to complex issues and problems. With an environmental studies minor you will have a wide variety of excellent career opportunities available to you: from environment-related jobs with corporations, government departments at the federal, state, and local level, and environmental organizations.

POTENTIAL CAREERS

Environmental Biologist • Environmental Chemist • Field Technician • Hazardous Waste Manager • Laboratory Technician • Lawyer • Pollution Inspector • Refuse Manager • Risk Assessor • Writer Environmental Manager • Environmental Program Director

GENERAL INFORMATION

The challenge of maintaining and creating a sustainable environment is one of the most pressing problems facing our society and world today. The Environmental Studies Program draws information, ideas and concepts from the natural sciences and social sciences to deal with complex and interdisciplinary environmental issues. The program is based upon the recognition that environmental and resource problems are not just biological, geological, economic, or political but a complex combination of many disciplines. Therefore, this program is structured as an interdisciplinary study of natural and social sciences to combine knowledge across traditional disciplinary lines. This information is essential for an interdisciplinary assessment, analysis and evaluation of environmental problems.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM

Program Scheduling

The Environmental Studies minor is primarily a day program, although some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.

Transfer Student Information:

The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines.  However, major coursework older than 10 years, from time of admittance, will be transferred in as elective credit and may not be applied to the major. Students may petition to the department chair for the older credits to be applied towards the major.

Credit for Prior Learning

Learning derived from life experiences and from individual study is of significant academic value and can often be equated with college-level studies.  Students may earn credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experience. Permission of the department chair is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 128 credit hours required for a degree.

Academic Performance Standard

Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Environmental Studies minor.

Internship/Cooperative Education

It is strongly encouraged that students participate in a summer undergraduate research experience either with a Marygrove College faculty member, or by securing an off-campus internship or fellowship before they graduate.  Students may receive elective credit for an internship through ENV 388, ENV 488, and/or ENV 491.

Ethnic/Cultural Studies Minor

Consisting of survey courses in African-American, Native American, Women, Latin American, Asian and Arab studies, this program offers a broad-based curriculum in general studies in which students will learn essential information to help them understand diversity and multicultural environments.

The requirements for an Ethnic/Cultural Studies minor are 24 credit hours.

A. Required Core Courses

HIS 311                       History of Blacks in America to 1865   

                                    -OR-

HIS 312                       History of Blacks in America since 1865
HUM 330                     Arab and Asian Humanities
HUM 332                     Latin American Humanities
POL/SOC 306             Ethnic & Racial Diversity
PSY 320                      Psychology of Women

B. Elective Courses

Select three electives

AH 350                    Black Art
DAN 379                 Ethnic Dance
ENG 222                 Introduction to African- American Literature
ENG 370                 Literature by Women
GEO 301                 Cultural Geography
HIS 335                    Women in U. S. History
HIS/POL 359           History of Civil Rights
HUM 150                Contemporary Cultural Studies
HUM 333A              African Humanities I
HUM 333B              African Humanities II
IS 324B                   Social Justice Seminar: Global Women’s Issues
PHL 276                  Critical Thinking: Voices of the African Diaspora
POL 308                 Contemporary Indian Issues
POL 309                 Ethnicity in Urban America
POL 315                 Third World Politics
POL 318                 Global Women’s Issues and Policies
POL/320                 African-American Politics
PSY/SOC 360         Social Psychology
RS 150                     Religion in the World
RS 226                     Black Religion in the Americas
SOC 345                 Sociology of the Family

Education Leadership

Education Leadership

PROGRAM OFFERED

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership leading to School Administrator Certification

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

A Master of Arts in Educational Leadership is a State Approved Administrative Certification Program that provides candidates with the knowledge, dispositions, and skills to manage and lead today’s schools. Courses are offered both on-line and on-campus. It prepares the educational leader to promote the success of all students by facilitating a vision of success that engages the school staff, families, and community members in research based practices that lead to increased student achievement. The program prepares administrators for the K-12 school principal, supervisory, and director opportunities. Candidates completing the program will be eligible for Administrative Certification K-12. The program focuses on the principal as the instructional leader and the chief architect of change in the school. In addition to a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of administrative and management theory and capacity building, students will be introduced to the concept of the principal as change agent working closely with teachers, parents, and community members to create a supportive environment where teachers can teach and students can learn. The program is consists of 36 credit hours of course work, consisting of 11 core classes and one sociology elective. 

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Education Overview

General Information

The Education Unit, in cooperation with other academic units, prepares students for teaching at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. Entrance into the College does not guarantee admission to the Teacher Certification (TCCERT) Program. Students must make a separate application to the Teacher Certification Program. Prior to admission to the TCCERT program, undergraduates will be assigned an advisor who will assist in planning the sequence of certification courses. Students must have a certifiable major and minor and adhere to the certification requirements as listed below in order to obtain teacher certification.

After successfully completing the College’s degree requirements (including the certifiable major and certifiable minor course work for teacher certification), approved First Aid and CPR (Adult & Child) training, and passing the appropriate Michigan tests for Teacher Certification (MTTC), you will be eligible for recommendation by Marygrove to the State of Michigan for a Provisional Teaching Certificate. Two specific teaching disciplines are offered in the education unit: Early Childhood Education (minor) and Special Education (major). Specific departments in the College offer all other teaching majors and minors. For full descriptions of these programs, see their respective program sections in this catalog. 

Education Frequently Asked Questions

Accreditation
Marygrove has the approval of the State of Michigan Department of Education for its certification programs. Students in early childhood education obtain the Early Childhood minor endorsement (ZA) while Special Education students earn the Learning Disabilities major endorsement (SM).

Title II Report Card
In accordance with the Title II requirements for teacher preparation institutions, Marygrove College reports the following for the academic year 2011-2012:

  • A total of 102 students were enrolled in our teacher preparation programs;
  • 31 candidates did their supervised student teaching (450 hours) under the direction of 15 supervising teachers (ratio 2.07:1);
  • 100 percent of those certified passed the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Basic Skills and discipline competency tests.

Specific Information

Academic Performance
Continuation in and completion of the TCCERT program depends on maintenance of a GPA of 2.7 and successful completion of the required sequence of courses. Students who do not meet the 2.7 GPA will receive a letter of academic probation from the education unit and be granted one term to make up the deficiency; they will be denied the opportunity to do directed teaching during the probationary period. Students who do not raise the GPA to 2.7 during the probationary period will be dropped from the TCCERT program. A student may register for EDU 499 (Student Teaching) a maximum of two times before being dropped from the program.

Admission to the Teacher Certification Program
Students take EDU 203: The Teaching Profession, prior to being admitted to the TCCERT program. This course should be taken in either the first or second year. It is an exploratory course that assists you in determining if you are suited for the teaching profession. During the course, the entire procedure for admission to teacher certification will be clarified. Following is an abbreviated listing of the requirements for admission:

  1. Satisfactory completion of EDU 203: The Teaching Profession.
  2. An overall grade point average of 2.7.
  3. No more than one notice of academic probation.
  4. Completion of all developmental and foundational courses in reading and writing with a minimum grade of C and of all math courses with a C average.
  5. Required application form filled in and submitted to the certification officer, along with other necessary documentation (obtain a packet from the education assistant in Room MC 214).
  6. A passing score on the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Basic Skills Test.
  7. Screening and acceptance process of the education unit, including personal interview.

Admission to Student Teaching
Admission to the TCCERT Program does not constitute permission to do student teaching. Admission to student teaching is contingent upon satisfying the requirements outlined below.

  1. An overall grade point average of 2.7 or better in courses taken at Marygrove College.
  2. Completion of all professional certification and teaching discipline courses except student teaching.
  3. Recommendation by an academic department and the Education Unit.
  4. Health record clearance from a physician within six months of student teaching.
  5. Review and approval by the Education Unit.

Marygrove does not waive student teaching.

Requirements for Michigan Provisional Certification
A candidate’s credentials will be sent to the state of Michigan for provisional certification once the following elements have been successfully completed and verified:

  • Undergraduate degree
  • Required MTTC tests-Basic Skills plus competency tests *
  • All undergraduate coursework for teaching disciplines, teaching major and minor where applicable
  • Entire Marygrove College sequence of professional teaching courses
  • Confirmation of valid First Aid and CPR (Adult & Child) credentials

Secondary – A passing score on the major and minor subject area tests. Elementary –Marygrove requires you to pass the Elementary Test and the test in your major.

Career Information
The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

 

Elementary Course List

Elementary Education Minor

  • AIE 344             Arts Infused Education
  • EDU 348           Teaching Writing and Speaking in Elementary Classrooms (3)
  • EDU 358           Language Acquisition and ELL (1)
  • ENG 205           Children’s Literature (3)
  • HSC 200           Introduction to Teaching Health and Physical Education (2)
  • ISC 210             Integrated Science I (4)
  • ISC 211             Integrated Science II (4)
  • MTH 310           Concepts in Elementary Math I (3)
  • MTH 311           Concepts in Elementary Math II            (3)
  • SST 350            Social Studies for Elementary Classrooms (3)

Elementary Education Minor

  • AIE 344             Arts Infused Education
  • EDU 348           Teaching Writing and Speaking in Elementary Classrooms (3)
  • EDU 358           Language Acquisition and ELL (1)
  • ENG 205           Children’s Literature (3)
  • HSC 200           Introduction to Teaching Health and Physical Education (2)
  • ISC 210             Integrated Science I (4)
  • ISC 211             Integrated Science II (4)
  • MTH 310           Concepts in Elementary Math I (3)
  • MTH 311           Concepts in Elementary Math II            (3)
  • SST 350            Social Studies for Elementary Classrooms (3)

Early Childhood Education Course Descriptions

EDU 203 The Teaching Profession 3 hours
Not offered Summer Term; Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107
Exploration of attitudes, perspectives and skills crucial to the growth of the developing teacher. A lab experience in an elementary or secondary school is integral to the course.

EDU 240 Developmental Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
Human development and factors that influence it with particular emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

EDU 241 Educational Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or 343
Introductory course in the psychology of learning and teaching (Grades K-12), emphasizing mental abilities, individual differences, motivation and application of psychological theory and research in learning. Appropriate laboratory experiences.

SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
An overview of the legislative rules and policies for children and youth with exceptional needs, including those with disabilities, the gifted and talented, and those with cultural
and linguistic differences. Development of an awareness of the characteristics indigenous to exceptional students and their relationship to teaching methodologies in the least restrictive environment. Concepts of inclusion. Observation in special settings that service exceptional children mandatory.

EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241
Analysis and discussion of the social and psychological dimensions of classroom environments: the design and implementation of effective instruction‚ roles of teacher and students in group dynamics‚ techniques for management and design of classroom instruction and student behavior. Techniques for developing effective communication with parents and community. Selected observation opportunity.

EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
Use multimedia as a teaching tool. Develop a plan of action integrating technology in support of instruction/learning. Explore, evaluate, and use technology to accomplish learning tasks independently and cooperatively. With appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 340 Technology Tools for Teachers 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
Applies appropriate technologies to critical thinking, creative expression and decision-making skills. Evaluates the societal and environmental impacts of technology.

EDU 343 Adolescent Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
Physical, psychological and social factors in personality development from the preadolescent through the late-adolescent period. Problems of adjustment, achievement of identity, and acceptance of the adult role.

EDU 344 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Techniques for teaching mathematics including K-8. Emphasis is on developing concepts through understanding, discovery, problem solving, observing patterns and relationships, and meeting the individual needs of children of various abilities and experience levels. Appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 347 General Secondary Methods 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Techniques for developing lesson plans, unit plans and course overviews which incorporate objectives, evaluation and a variety of teaching-learning strategies. Field experiences and simulations in lesson presentation and classroom management. Appropriate field based experience.

ENG 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108.
An introduction to the theories and practices of teaching written and oral literacies at the elementary and secondary levels.

EDU 354 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies
3 hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Combination of theoretical and practical models, grades K-8, providing multicultural approaches to activities, materials, and resources necessary for teaching social studies. Appropriate field based experience.

EDU 357 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Analyzes the variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures in various content areas and develops teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills and reading proficiency. Addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of middle school and secondary school students with reading problems. Appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 364A Methods for Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Addresses the reading, writing, listening, and speaking processes in literacy development. Presents and examines teaching strategies and materials that support integrated language arts instruction. Strategies for organization and management of classroom reading programs providing for individual differences in grades K-8 are developed. Related software applications will be explored. Guided observation and field-based experience.

EDU 364B Methods for Elementary Reading: Practicum Strategies 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 364A; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Strategies for developing and implementing detailed lesson plans based on a diagnostic-instruction model for both developmental skills in reading and reading in the content areas. First half of the course will prepare the student for field-based experience. Peer, instructor, and self-evaluation of lessons.

EDU 374 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Methodology appropriate for teaching scientific concepts. Also teaching demonstrations, projects, daily and unit planning. One field trip. Extensive use of A/V media in Marygrove’s Library Resources Room. Emphasis on content and methods for grades K-8. Appropriate field based experience.

EDU 390 The Adult Learner 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
An examination of theories of learning in adulthood and the issues related to life-long learning. The emphasis is on adult learning as a process of transformation.

EDU 404 Guided Experiences With Children 1-3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status
Field work with children including such activities as tutoring, assisting the teacher‚ camp counseling‚ playground supervision, and other experiences which contribute to a prospective teacher’s professional development. May be taken more than once to a maximum of 3 hours.

EDU 475 Foundations in American Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Structure, function and purposes of American education, examination of the philosophical, social, political and economic contexts of educational systems; role and characteristics of the teaching profession.

EDU 491 Independent Study 3 hours
When necessary and with approval of advisor, students are permitted to request an independent study, with appropriate field-based experience.

EDU 499 Student Teaching 10-12 hours
Prerequisites: Admission to Student Teaching; Methods at appropriate level;
Term: 1, 2
Observation and guided, full-time professional laboratory experience in public or private school classrooms at the appropriate level. Seminar required.

EDU 203 The Teaching Profession 3 hours
Not offered Summer Term; Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107
Exploration of attitudes, perspectives and skills crucial to the growth of the developing teacher. A lab experience in an elementary or secondary school is integral to the course.

EDU 240 Developmental Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
Human development and factors that influence it with particular emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

EDU 241 Educational Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or 343
Introductory course in the psychology of learning and teaching (Grades K-12), emphasizing mental abilities, individual differences, motivation and application of psychological theory and research in learning. Appropriate laboratory experiences.

SED 250 Education of the Exceptional Learner 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
An overview of the legislative rules and policies for children and youth with exceptional needs, including those with disabilities, the gifted and talented, and those with cultural
and linguistic differences. Development of an awareness of the characteristics indigenous to exceptional students and their relationship to teaching methodologies in the least restrictive environment. Concepts of inclusion. Observation in special settings that service exceptional children mandatory.

EDU 324 Principles of Classroom Management 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241
Analysis and discussion of the social and psychological dimensions of classroom environments: the design and implementation of effective instruction‚ roles of teacher and students in group dynamics‚ techniques for management and design of classroom instruction and student behavior. Techniques for developing effective communication with parents and community. Selected observation opportunity.

EDU 330 Technology in the Classroom 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
Use multimedia as a teaching tool. Develop a plan of action integrating technology in support of instruction/learning. Explore, evaluate, and use technology to accomplish learning tasks independently and cooperatively. With appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 340 Technology Tools for Teachers 3 hours
Prerequisites: None
Applies appropriate technologies to critical thinking, creative expression and decision-making skills. Evaluates the societal and environmental impacts of technology.

EDU 343 Adolescent Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
Physical, psychological and social factors in personality development from the preadolescent through the late-adolescent period. Problems of adjustment, achievement of identity, and acceptance of the adult role.

EDU 344 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Techniques for teaching mathematics including K-8. Emphasis is on developing concepts through understanding, discovery, problem solving, observing patterns and relationships, and meeting the individual needs of children of various abilities and experience levels. Appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 347 General Secondary Methods 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Techniques for developing lesson plans, unit plans and course overviews which incorporate objectives, evaluation and a variety of teaching-learning strategies. Field experiences and simulations in lesson presentation and classroom management. Appropriate field based experience.

ENG 348 Methods of Teaching Writing and Speaking, K-12 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108.
An introduction to the theories and practices of teaching written and oral literacies at the elementary and secondary levels.

EDU 354 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies
3 hours

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Combination of theoretical and practical models, grades K-8, providing multicultural approaches to activities, materials, and resources necessary for teaching social studies. Appropriate field based experience.

EDU 357 Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Analyzes the variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures in various content areas and develops teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills and reading proficiency. Addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of middle school and secondary school students with reading problems. Appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 364A Methods for Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Addresses the reading, writing, listening, and speaking processes in literacy development. Presents and examines teaching strategies and materials that support integrated language arts instruction. Strategies for organization and management of classroom reading programs providing for individual differences in grades K-8 are developed. Related software applications will be explored. Guided observation and field-based experience.

EDU 364B Methods for Elementary Reading: Practicum Strategies 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 364A; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program.
Strategies for developing and implementing detailed lesson plans based on a diagnostic-instruction model for both developmental skills in reading and reading in the content areas. First half of the course will prepare the student for field-based experience. Peer, instructor, and self-evaluation of lessons.

EDU 374 Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 241; Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Methodology appropriate for teaching scientific concepts. Also teaching demonstrations, projects, daily and unit planning. One field trip. Extensive use of A/V media in Marygrove’s Library Resources Room. Emphasis on content and methods for grades K-8. Appropriate field based experience.

EDU 390 The Adult Learner 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205
An examination of theories of learning in adulthood and the issues related to life-long learning. The emphasis is on adult learning as a process of transformation.

EDU 404 Guided Experiences With Children 1-3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status
Field work with children including such activities as tutoring, assisting the teacher‚ camp counseling‚ playground supervision, and other experiences which contribute to a prospective teacher’s professional development. May be taken more than once to a maximum of 3 hours.

EDU 475 Foundations in American Education 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification TCCERT Program
Structure, function and purposes of American education, examination of the philosophical, social, political and economic contexts of educational systems; role and characteristics of the teaching profession.

EDU 491 Independent Study 3 hours
When necessary and with approval of advisor, students are permitted to request an independent study, with appropriate field-based experience.

EDU 499 Student Teaching 10-12 hours
Prerequisites: Admission to Student Teaching; Methods at appropriate level;
Term: 1, 2
Observation and guided, full-time professional laboratory experience in public or private school classrooms at the appropriate level. Seminar required.

English Minor

The requirements for an English minor are 23 credit hours (with at least 9 credit hours at the 300 and 400 level), including:

1. General English Minor

ENG 160        Introduction to Literature

ENG 260        Approaches to Literary Studies

ENG 314        Literary Theory and Criticism

ENG 320        Selected Writers

Four courses from the following:
ENG 203        Literature: The Short Story
ENG 206        Introduction to Poetry
ENG 222        Introduction to African-American Literature
                  -OR-
ENG 322        Studies in African-American Literature
ENG 241        History of the Drama
ENG 275        Introduction to Classical Literature and Mythology
ENG 301        British Writers I
ENG 302        British Writers II
ENG 310        American Literature I
ENG 311        American Literature II
ENG 321        Modern Poetry
ENG 331        Contemporary Drama
ENG 333        Detroit in Literature
ENG 350        World Literature
ENG 351        Shakespeare
ENG 361        Shakespeare on Film
ENG 352        The Novel
ENG 353        Contemporary Literature of Africa
ENG 370        Literature by Women

2. English Minor for Teaching
ENG 160        Introduction to Literature
ENG 205        Children’s Literature
ENG 260        Approaches to Literary Studies
ENG 317        The English Language: History, Structure, and Grammar

Four courses from the following:
ENG 203        Literature: The Short Story
ENG 206        Introduction to Poetry
ENG 222        Introduction to African-American Literature
                -OR-
ENG 322        Studies in African-American Literature
ENG 241        History of the Drama
ENG 275        Introduction to Classical Literature and Mythology
ENG 301        British Writers I
ENG 302        British Writers II
ENG 310        American Literature I
ENG 311        American Literature II
ENG 320        Selected Writers
ENG 321        Modern Poetry
ENG 331        Contemporary Drama
ENG 333        Detroit in Literature
ENG 350        World Literature
ENG 351        Shakespeare
ENG 352        The Novel
ENG 353        Contemporary Literature of Africa
ENG 361        Shakespeare on Film
ENG 370        Literature by Women

Other English courses approved by your academic advisor. Please see additional requirements, including ENG 348, Teaching Writing and Speaking, in the Teacher Certification section of this catalog.

Education Course Descriptions

 

EDU 203

The Teaching Profession

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  None

This course is designed as an in-depth introduction to multiple considerations of the career of teaching.  This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the important aspects of teaching, and allows students to observe the teaching profession in action.  Course requires 25 service hours in a classroom setting.

EDU 240

Developmental Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  None.  Elementary Level Exploratory Student

Human development and factors that influence it with particular emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

EDU 241

Educational Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This is an introductory course in the psychology of learning and teaching (Grades K-12), emphasizing mental abilities, individual differences, motivation and application of psychological theory and research in learning.  The course emphasizes constructivist theories of learning and cognition, examining the effects of culture and gender on learning, and studies the classroom as a social setting.

EDU 275

Foundations in American Education

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

In this course, students examine the structure, function, and purposes of American education. These topics include philosophical, social, historical, political, and economic contexts of educational systems, and the role and characteristics of the teaching profession.

EDU 330

Technology in the Classroom

3 credit  hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This course explores the use of multimedia teaching tools. Students develop plans of action integrating technology in support of instruction and learning. They explore, evaluate, and use technology to accomplish learning tasks independently and cooperatively. Course includes appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 343

Adolescent Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 205. Secondary Level Exploratory Student

Physical, psychological and social factors in personality development from the preadolescent through the late-adolescent period. Problems of adjustment, achievement of identity, and acceptance of the adult role.

EDU 344

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course addresses approaches for teaching mathematics to grades K-8. Emphasis is on developing Math concepts through discovery, problem solving, observing patterns and relationships, and meeting the individual needs of children of various abilities and experience levels. Field based experiences required.

 

EDU 347

General Secondary Methods

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 343, EDU 348, EDU 351 and program acceptance as a Secondary Candidate

This course focuses on techniques for developing lesson plans, unit plans and course overviews which incorporate objectives, evaluation and a variety of teaching-learning strategies. Field based experiences and simulations in lesson presentation and classroom management required.

EDU 348/ ENG 348

Teaching Writing and Speaking in the Elementary and Secondary Classroom

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: none

This course presents an introduction to the theories and practices of teaching written and oral literacy at the elementary and secondary levels.

EDU 351

Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment                       

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This course offers approaches to curriculum, instruction and assessment designed to engage students in an integrated process of teaching and learning.  Students design units and create supporting lesson plans based on Grade Level Content Standards that focus on using differentiated instructional strategies, assessment practices, and technology integration.  Students practice collaboration skills, applying peer review processes aimed at improving unit design and lesson plans.

EDU 352

Assessment and Differentiation

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 275  program acceptance as an Elementary Pre-Candidate

This course builds upon content introduced in EDU 351 to prepare candidates to assess the effects of instruction on student performance. Emphasis is placed on theories and concepts related to differentiation of instruction and assessment in order to meet the needs of a wide range of learners, including those in special education and speakers of English as a second language.

 

EDU 353

Designing and Managing Effective Learning Environments for Diverse Learners

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 348, EDU 351, EDU 352 [Elem only], and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Candidate

This course addresses the design and management of curriculum, instruction and classrooms to provide meaningful learning for diverse groups of students. The educational implications of the characteristics of students with exceptionalities are explored. Research in practices of effective teaching is examined, with specific emphasis on teacher and student behaviors related to aspects of diversity in urban settings. Techniques for developing effective communication with parents and community are explored.  Field-based experiences required.

 

EDU 354

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course offers a combination of theoretical and practical models, providing multicultural approaches to activities, materials, and resources necessary for teaching social studies grades K-8. Field based experiences required.

EDU 357

Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 343, EDU 348, EDU 351 and program acceptance as a Secondary Candidate

This course addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of middle school and secondary school students with reading problems. The course presents analysis of variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures in various content areas, and develops teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills and proficiency.  Field based experiences required.

EDU 364A

Methods for Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course addresses the reading, writing, listening, and speaking processes in literacy development. Students exam­ine teaching strategies and materials that support integrated language arts instruction. Strategies for organization and management of classroom reading programs in grades K-8 are developed. Related software applications are explored. Guided observation and field-based experience required.

EDU 364B

Methods for Elementary Reading: Practicum Strategies   

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course presents strategies for developing and implementing detailed lesson plans based on a diagnostic-instruction model for both developmental skills in reading and reading in the content areas. First half of the course prepares the student for field-based experience. Peer, instructor, and self-evaluation of lessons.

EDU 374

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course presents methodology appropriate for teaching scientific concepts. Teaching demonstrations, projects, daily and unit planning are approaches addressed in this course. Students participate in one field trip. The course makes extensive use of media in Marygrove’s Library Resources Room.  Emphasis is placed on the inquiry-based strategies, problem-solving activities, hands-on activities, the interdisciplinary nature of science, children's understandings, objectives of school science programs, science education reform, methods of instruction, assessment practices, experimental programs, and content in the physical, life, and earth sciences. Emphasis is on con­tent and methods for grades K-8.  Field based experience required.

EDU 491

Independent Study

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  Permission of Advisor and Instructor

When necessary and with approval of advisor, students are permitted to request an independent study.

EDU 499 Student Teaching  and Seminar

10-12 credit hours

Prerequisites: Completion of all required teacher certification coursework, Admission to Student Teaching

This capstone course includes observation and guided‚ full-time professional laboratory experience in public or private school classrooms at the appropriate level.  Seminar required.  Fall and Spring term only.

 

Educational Technology

Educational Technology

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Marygrove College, in partnership with Lawrence Technological University, now provides educators a means to improve their teaching skills. At the same time, they improve learning for their K-12 students through the use of educational technology. Graduates of the program will become leaders in using computers and integrating educational technology in the classrooms. They will also become technology experts in the school and school district. The M.Ed. program comprises 30 credit hours of graduate study in practice-oriented courses covering all aspects of integrating technology into the classroom. Upon completion of the 21 core credit hours, certified teachers can obtain their NP endorsement. This endorsement is valid with or without the master’s degree. Courses are generally scheduled in the evenings and are offered online.

The Educational Technology programs are designed to develop knowledge and skills in using the computer to enhance teaching, applying emerging technologies to the creation of educational media, participating in decision making about adopting educational technology applications, making presentations to various audiences using appropriate technologies and training and coaching others in the application of technology.

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