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Categories starting with M

Master in the Art of Teaching (1)

Master in the Art of Teaching
Known for excellence in teaching since 1905, Marygrove College has been offering the convenience of online MAT classes and the flexibility of its Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) online degree program since 1990. Marygrove's MAT degree provides teachers with the opportunity to link the latest developments in educational research to their own teaching practice. The MAT degree program is designed to empower teachers by focusing on the knowledge and skills required to deliver effective instruction to diverse learners from preschool through high school, including those with special needs.

Modern Language Translation (1)

Modern Language Translation
The Modern Language Translation program is designed for professionals who plan to pursue a career in translation and train for the American Translators Association (ATA) certification. The certificate is also intended for individuals who wish to communicate effectively in a multilingual and multicultural work environment. The sequence of courses provides translation training from Arabic, French, or Spanish into English.

Master in the Art of Teaching (28)

Master in the Art of Teaching
Known for excellence in teaching since 1905, Marygrove College has been offering the convenience of online MAT classes and the flexibility of its Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) online degree program since 1990. Marygrove's MAT degree provides teachers with the opportunity to link the latest developments in educational research to their own teaching practice. The MAT degree program is designed to empower teachers by focusing on the knowledge and skills required to deliver effective instruction to diverse learners from preschool through high school, including those with special needs.

Core Courses (6), Specialty Courses (21)

Master of Education + Teacher Certification (2)

Master of Education + Teacher Certification
Marygrove’s education programs range from Early Childhood Education to Adult Learning. Our goal is to prepare compassionate, reflective teachers who are academically, socially, and technically competent to communicate with all learners in a diverse world.

Modern Language Translation (3)

Modern Language Translation
The Modern Language Translation program is designed for professionals who plan to pursue a career in translation and train for the American Translators Association (ATA) certification. The certificate is also intended for individuals who wish to communicate effectively in a multilingual and multicultural work environment. The sequence of courses provides translation training from Arabic, French, or Spanish into English.

Mathematics (7)

Mathematics
The Department of Mathematics offers undergraduate courses in mathematics, a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in mathematics, a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in mathematics for elementary teaching, a minor in mathematics, and a minor in mathematics for elementary teaching. You may take courses designed to build basic math skills, as well as calculus, differential equations, discrete mathematics, linear algebra, probability and statistics, and college geometry. The programs are intended for day and/or evening students.

Modern Language Translation (4)

Modern Language Translation
The Modern Language Translation program is designed for professionals who plan to pursue a career in translation and train for the American Translators Association (ATA) certification. The certificate is also intended for individuals who wish to communicate effectively in a multilingual and multicultural work environment. The sequence of courses provides translation training from Arabic, French, or Spanish into English.

Music (10)

Music
The Department of Music offers private weekly instruction in piano, voice, organ, and guitar to majors and non-majors. Study of other instruments may be arranged with due notice. All applied music, whether keyboard, vocal, or instrumental will develop technique, style, musicianship, memorization, interpretation, and repertoire appropriate to the medium. Specific technique and repertoire requirements for each proficiency level are available in the department. All music majors and minors enrolled in applied music courses are required to attend music department recitals as specified each semester. Failure to meet the recital attendance requirements will result in the adjustment of the student’s applied music grade in his/her applied area of concentration. Courses may be repeated.

Items starting with M

Minor in Forensic Science

 

A minor in forensic science consists of the following components:

A. Related Discipline Requirements

CJ 110             Introduction to Criminal Justice
BIO 150           Biology I: From Molecules to Cells
CHM 140         General Chemistry 1*: Atoms and Molecules      

B. Core Requirements

FSC 140    Introduction to Forensic Science
FSC 220    Crime Scene Investigation and Evidence Collection 
FSC 385    Forensic Biology

   or

440 Forensic Chemistry
FSC 410     Special Topics in Forensic Science 

 

MINOR IN ART

A minor in art provides you with a complementary body of knowledge and experience in visual issues that are considered essential for many other fields. Examples are careers in communications, fashion, education, business, human ecology, humanities and the other arts. Many business owners and business administrators are also looking for those who will fit into the “creative economy”.  Examples include many of the new internet related products and services, the fashion industry, entertainment industries, etc. A minor in art consists of 20 studio hours beginning with ART 111 and 115. 

Minor in Biology

A minor in biology consists of a total of 20 credit hours in biology and 8 credit hours in chemistry divided as follows:

A. Core Requirements
BIO 150        Biology I: From Molecules to Cells
BIO 151        Biology II: Unity and Diversity of LifeB. Electives


At least three courses from the following:
BIO 201        Ecology and the Environment
BIO 226        General Zoology
BIO 234        General Botany
BIO 267        Clinical Anatomy and Physiology
BIO 321        Microbiology
BIO 360        Biochemistry
BIO 485        Genetics
BIO 490        Cell and Molecular Biology

C. Related Discipline Requirements
CHM 140      General Chemistry I
                        -AND-
CHM 241      General Chemistry II
                        -OR-     
CHM 325      Organic Chemistry I


Minor in Biology for Secondary Teacher Certification
BIO 150        Biology I: From Molecules to Cells
BIO 151        Biology II: Unity and Diversity of Life
BIO 201        Ecology and the Environment
BIO 226        General Zoology
BIO 234        General Botany
BIO 347        The Teaching of Biology
BIO 267        Clinical Anatomy and Physiology
CHM 140      General Chemistry I
                        -AND-
CHM 241      General Chemistry II
                        -OR-     
CHM 325      Organic Chemistry I

Minor in Business

A minor in business consists of the following compo­nents:

A. Related Discipline Requirements
Three hours in computer information systems and three hours in economics.

B. Core Requirements
BUS 173     Introduction to Business
BUS 304     Business Law I
ACC 224     Principles of Accounting I
ACC 234     Principles of Accounting II

C. Required Courses in one Area of Concentration
Select one of the two following concentration se­quences.

1. Accounting
BUS 307     Finance
Choose at least two from:
ACC 324     Financial Accounting I
ACC 334     Cost Accounting
ACC 354     Federal Income Tax Accounting
                -OR-

2. General Business
BUS 266     Principles of Organization and Management
BUS 302     Principles of Marketing
Choose at least two from:
BUS 308     Business and Professional Writing
BUS 310     Financial Investment Strategy
BUS 314     Business Law II
BUS 320     Ecommerce
BUS 322     Consumer Behavior
BUS 323     Human Resource Management
BUS 332     Sales Management Strategies
BUS 333     Entrepreneurship
BUS 342     International Marketing
BUS 353     Retailing Management
BUS 368     Quality Management Principles
BUS 382     Business and Professional Ethics
BUS 384     Consumer Money Management
BUS 423     Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations
BUS 496A      Senior Research Seminar: Current Issues

 

MTTC Testing

All teacher certification candidates must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Basic Skills (96) test.

In addition, Marygrove College is recognized by the Michigan Department of Education for competency testing in the following areas at the levels indicated ( E = Elementary; S = Secondary). This will be a guide so that you are sure to take the correct test for certification! Note that competency tests must be taken within 5 years of the time credentials are submitted to the state.

Objectives for each test are on reserve in the Marygrove College Library. Tutoring support can often be arranged through the Teacher Certification Officer.

>> Go to the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification Web site for more information.

>> MTTC Web site Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

CODE TEST MAJOR MINOR ENDORSEMENT
17 BIOLOGY (DA) S S
18 CHEMISTRY (DC) S S
50 COMPUTER SCIENCE (NR) S S
46 DANCE (MH) E & S E & S
82 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ZA) E
07 ECONOMICS (CA) S
83 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION E**
02 ENGLISH (BA) E & S E & S
23 FRENCH (FA) E & S
09 HISTORY (CC) E & S E & S
54 HUMANITIES (PX) E & S
93 INTEGRATED SCIENCE (DI) E
90 LANGUAGE ARTS (BX) E E
89 MATHEMATICS - ELEMENTARY (EX) E E
22 MATHEMATICS - SECONDARY (EX) S S
39 MUSIC EDUCATION (JX) E & S E
10 POLITICAL SCIENCE (CD) S S
92 READING SPECIALIST (BT) K-12
12 SOCIOLOGY S
84 SOCIAL STUDIES (RX) E & S E
28 SPANISH E & S
63 SPECIAL ED - LEARNING DISABILITIES E K-12

** The Elementary Education test certifies teachers for K-5 all subjects and K-8 self-contained classroom. The subject area tests certify elementary teachers from 6-8 and secondary teachers from 7-12.

Minor in Economics

A. Required courses

ECN 200        Introductory Macroeconomics

ECN 203        Introductory Microeconomics

ECN 310        Money and Banking

ECN 305        Introductory Statistics

ECN 341        Issues in Economics

                       -OR-

ECN 361        International Economics and Finance

B. Other Electives, such that when combined with the required courses above, total a minimum

     of 20 credit hours in economics.

Minor in Gerontology

Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree may elect a minor in gerontology. The minor consists of 24 credit hours including the six courses listed as “required” for the certificate program. The remainder of courses will be chosen from the “electives” listed above.

Modern Language Translation Requirements

Admissions Requirements
Modern Language Translation courses are open to students who have completed their undergraduate work, including 20 hours or equivalent in the appropriate foreign language. They are also open to students who have native or near-native reading and writing proficiency in English and Arabic, French, or Spanish. Enrollment in a degree program is not mandatory.

Requirements for Translation Certificate
The Translation Certificate requires completion of fifteen credit hours in the following courses.

ARA 500, Principles of Translation
ARA 501, Translation Workshop I
ARA 502, Translation Workshop II
ARA 503, Business Translation Workshop
ARA 588, Cooperative Field Experience

OR

FRE 500, Principles of Translation
FRE 501, Translation Workshop I
FRE 502, Translation Workshop II
FRE 503, Business Translation Workshop
FRE 588, Cooperative Field Experience

OR

SPA 500, Principles of Translation
SPA 501, Translation Workshop I
SPA 502, Translation Workshop II
SPA 503, Business Translation Workshop
SPA 588, Cooperative Field Experience

The Translation Certificate is granted to students who complete each course in the sequence with a grade of B or better.

Music Minor

 

A minor in music requires a minimum of 24 hours, including:

A. Required Music Courses

6 credits of Music Theory (MUS101, MUS102, MUS 123, MUS 124 as appropriate)  

MUS 100A                     3 cr.           Piano Class
MUS 105                       3 cr.            Encounters with Music

2 ensemble credits from following:

MUS 202/302                1 cr.            Marygrove College Chorale
MUS 204/404                1 cr.            Foundations of Ringing I, II
MUS 205                       1 cr.            Community Band

B. Applied Music

6 credits of private lessons  in principal instrument (e.g. voice, piano, organ or guitar).

C. Electives

Additional courses are elected in consultation with an advisor.

Education majors at the secondary level may not elect music as a minor, due to state certification requirements.

 

Minor in Sociology

The requirements for the minor in Sociology are:

A. A minimum of 21 total credits is required.

B. Required Courses in Sociology include:
SOC 201                 Sociological Perspectives
SOC 202                 Social Problems
SOC 306                 Ethnic and Racial Diversity

C. Additional 12 hours in Sociology to total at least 21 credits.
Recommended courses include:
SOC 311        Deviant Behavior
SOC 345        Sociology of the Family
SOC 375        Sociological Theory
SOC 393        Urban Social Issues

Master of Arts, English

CONTACT

Darcy Brandel, Ph.D.
Program Coordinator
Madame Cadillac Bldg., Room 262
Direct: (313) 927-1447
E-mail: dbrandel@marygrove.edu

PROGRAM OFFERED

Master of Arts (M.A.) in English

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Master of Arts in English is designed to provide both theoretical and practical foundations for teaching English in community colleges or high schools and/or preparing for advanced graduate study in the field. It is a 33-credit-hour program whose courses are offered in the evening and on weekends. Two required core courses will give a solid base for graduate English studies, while two 600-level advanced seminars will offer rigorous opportunities to explore various disciplinary topics in depth. The flexibly conceived Master’s Project will provide an opportunity for students to further explore their topic of interest in literary works or in teaching composition.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The Master of Arts in English is open to any applicant who has successfully completed the requirements for a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education. In addition to the admission requirements as explained in the “Graduate Admissions” section of this catalog, all applicants should submit two letters of recommendation and a substantial writing sample that demonstrates adequate preparation and potential for graduate work in English. After reviewing the completed application package, the Graduate Coordinator will schedule a personal interview.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

To complete the master’s degree, students must complete 33 credits of approved coursework from the following requirements:

Required Courses (6 credits)

ENG 501 Foundations of Graduate English Studies (3)

ENG 514 Literary Criticism (3)

Electives (21 credits)

Select a minimum of 21 credits from the following list in consultation with your graduate coordinator. Must choose at least 6 credits of Advanced Seminar coursework (600 level). No more than 3 credits of Independent Study may be counted toward graduation requirements.

ENG 510 Detroit in Literature (3)

ENG 520 Dickinson and Frost (3)

ENG 521 Adolescent Literature: Realism, Fantasy, and Historical Fiction (3)

ENG 524 Selected Topics (3)

ENG 525 Contemporary Drama 1970-Present (3)

ENG 529 Studies in African American Literature (3)

ENG 530 19th Century Novel (3)

ENG 534 Studies in Modern British Literature (3)

ENG 535 Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature (3)

ENG 538 The Romantic Poets (3)

ENG 539 Witchcraft and Gender (3)

ENG 541 Approaches to Composition (3)

ENG 542 Practicum in Teaching Writing (3)

ENG 551 Shakespeare: Text and Theory (3)

ENG 561 Shakespeare on Film (3)

ENG 565 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3)

ENG 570 Literature by Women (3)

ENG 601 American Modernist Poetry (3)

ENG 603 Postcolonial Re-imaginings: “The Empire Writes Back” (3) 

ENG 604 The Harlem Renaissance (3)

ENG 605 Studies in Medieval Literature: Women Writers of the Middle Ages (3)

ENG 606 Experimental Literature by Women (3)

ENG 610 Nineteenth Century American Authors (3)

ENG 620 Novel and Nation (3)

ENG 691 Independent Study (1-3)

Master’s Project (6 credits)

ENG 660 Directed Reading (3)

ENG 665 Masters Project (3)

Master of Arts, English Course Descriptions

ENG 501: Foundations of Graduate English   3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces students to graduate studies in English literature and language. It focuses on current professional issues in the field, various contemporary theoretical approaches to literature and language, their practical implications in writing and teaching, and the principles and procedures of scholarly research.

ENG 510: Detroit in Literature                        3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines representations of Detroit in poetry and fiction produced between the 1930s and the present. By reading and discussing works of such authors as Robert Hayden, Harriet Arnow, Dudley Randall, Joyce Carol Oates, Philip Levine, Lawrence Joseph, Jim Daniels, Jeffrey Eugenides, and others, the course studies the translation of a familiar environment into literature and “places” Detroit in modern American culture.

ENG 514: Literary Criticism 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will focus on examination and application of the theoretical concepts and contexts that are critical to success in graduate literary studies, including such concepts as deconstruction, formalism, new historicism, and Marxism.

ENG 520: Dickinson and Frost 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the work of two New England poets who share not only the imagery of a common natural landscape but also a set of common philosophical and literary traditions. Course sessions will consist of close reading and explication of individual poems by the entire class and discussion of the issues raised in them.

ENG 521: Adolescent Literature: Realism, Fantasy, and Historical Fiction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will concentrate on analyzing literary works whose primary audience is middle and high school age students. The course will focus on works in the genres of realistic fiction, historical fiction, and fantasy/science fiction. Literature will be broadly defined to include printed texts, films, television, and games, including works by authors such as Lois Duncan, Rosa Guy, Virginia Hamilton, S.E. Hinton, Ursula K. Le Guin, Mildred D. Taylor, and Cynthia Voigt.

ENG 524: Selected Topics 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

In-depth study of major authors, periods, or topics as chosen by the instructor.

ENG 525: Contemporary Drama 1970-Present 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines works of influential drama from the 1970s to the present.

ENG 529: Studies in African American Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the work of influential black writers of the 20th century such as Nella Larsen, Toni Morrison, Dorothy West, Paule Marshall, Charles Johnson, Clarence Major, and John Edgar Wideman. The course provides a window into how these innovative writers have documented, critiqued, and responded to the major historical and literary movements that have shaped their ideologies and informed their world views.

ENG 530: 19th Century Novel 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will examine canonical novels of the European 19th Century, such as Crime and Punishment, Madame Bovary, Sons and Lovers, and selections from Dickens, Hardy, Thackeray, Zola, Bronte, and others.

ENG 534: Studies in Modern British Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the student to the historical, intellectual, and formal aspects of British literary modernism. The course will attempt to provide a broad, if necessarily selective, picture of modernist literary works in all its considerable variety, and will also focus on modernism’s recurrent preoccupations, particularly its concern with modernity itself. Readings might include selected works of authors such as Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Forster, Ford, West, Ishiguro,and Bowen.

ENG 535: Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will explore a range of texts that reveal the ethnic diversity of North American literature, asking readers to consider both common themes and cultural specificities found in diverse “minority” literatures. The course will explore themes and theories of alienation, fragmentation, dislocation, hybridity, borderlands/border crossing, appropriation, resistance, and generational difference. The course will pay particular attention to language and the role it plays in defining reality, exploring the ways ethnic writers both resist and appropriate dominant languages in an attempt to formulate their own modes of communication.

ENG 538: The Romantic Poets 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will survey the major poets and poetry of the British Romantic period (roughly 1789-1832), with an emphasis on how the poetry responded to the turbulent social, emotional, intellectual, and political dislocations of the times. The course will provide the key terms and texts for the study of Romanticism as both a period of literature and a set of aesthetic practices that may be applied beyond that period.

ENG 539: Witchcraft and Gender 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will explore early American notions of gender, especially as they relate to and inform the infamous witch hunts in Salem and beyond. The course will examine relevant early American literature to connect and complicate the relationship between conceptions of womanhood and the hysteria of the witch-craze.

ENG 541: Approaches to Composition 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course examines important contemporary critical theories and questions that have shaped the conversations of writing teachers and researchers, particularly over the last four decades.

ENG 542: Practicum in Teaching Writing 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course provides the guidance and support necessary to the practical work of teaching English. Topics for discussion include exploring major theories of teaching writing and how they inform practice, incorporating rhetorical practices in the classroom, crafting successful assignments, evaluating and responding to student writing, creating a learning community in the classroom, and developing a philosophy of teaching English.

ENG 551: Shakespeare: Text and Theory 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the graduate student to Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic works by approaching the canon with attention to Shakespeare’s language, to historical context, to pedagogical issues, and to major approaches from literary criticism of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

ENG 561: Shakespeare on Film             3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will examine texts and contemporary film interpretations of such works as Hamlet (Branagh, Zeffirelli, Almereyda), Romeo and Juliet (Zeffirelli and Luhrmann), Branagh’s versions of Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, Love’s Labours’ Lost, and Trevor Nunn’s Twelfth Night.

ENG 565: Writing Creative Nonfiction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

This course will explore how to write alternative forms of nonfiction beyond the traditional academic essay. Using readings, discussions, and class workshops, students will use elements from fiction and poetry to write creative nonfiction such as memoirs, personal essays, nature essays, and personal cultural criticism.

ENG 570: Literature by Women 3 credits

Prerequisites: none 

This course considers some established traditions in writing by women, while paying close attention to how these traditions are both revisited and revised by subsequent writers. We will examine how the texts are in dialogue with one another as well as whose voices and experiences remain silenced in various texts.  Using the historical context of the various waves of the women’s movement, along with the framework of feminist theory, the course seeks to highlight both the establishment of and resistance to traditions in literature by women.

ENG 601: American Modernist Poetry 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

This course attempts to discover the primary characteristics of modernist poetry as reflected in the works of a group of American poets who came to prominence in the first two decades of the twentieth century, including Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Moore, and Hughes. The course considers the nature of “modernisms,” how their works define the nature of truth, what the works say about the individual’s relationship to the social world, what it means to be an artist in the context of modernism, and what historical, aesthetic, critical and cultural contexts gave rise to modernist poetry.

ENG 603: Postcolonial Re-imaginings: “The Empire Writes Back” 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

This course is designed as an introduction to a wide variety of both literary and theoretical works that cover the period of British colonial expansion and its postcolonial aftermath. It is conceived as a comparative literature/culture course—for instance, to put the First World literature in dialogue with that of the Third World or to re-read 18th-century literature with a 20th-century perspective. For such a comparative course, literatures from Africa, India, and the Caribbean as well as from England will be selected. Through these works, we will study what the globalization of modern culture has brought about in such areas as race, gender, language, and nationalism. 

ENG 604: The Harlem Renaissance 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

This course offers a detailed examination of selected works by major and minor literary voices of the Harlem Renaissance. Specifically, it analyzes these emerging writers in the context of varied cultural, social, and historical influences, which impacted their works. This course also discusses the contemporary scholarship of leading critics, literary and culture theory, and takes a virtual tour of Harlem, to prepare for final research projects and presentations.

ENG 605: Studies in Medieval Literature: Women Writers of the Middle Ages 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

This course is an advanced introduction to female authors of the twelfth through fifteenth centuries in England and Western Europe. Our primary texts include poems, treatises, letters, romance, autobiography, mystical and devotional writing.  Major authors represented are Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, and the Paston women.

ENG 606: Experimental Literature by Women 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

Many artists believe that the way to accomplish art which creates social change in the world is to resist the traditional by utilizing new forms, styles, and approaches. Challenging any kind of established literary tradition, however, often results in marginalization; therefore, for an already historically marginalized group like women writers to experiment raises the risk of being silenced, discredited, and attacked. This course considers how various women writers across the twentieth century have experimented with literary form and explores the implications of this experimentation on the authors, on notions of gender, on the world.

ENG 610: Nineteenth Century American Authors 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

In this seminar, we examine important points of contention between nineteenth century American writers, including Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Stowe, Dickinson, Whitman, and Twain.  Subjects covered might include war and territorial conquest; race and ethnicity, slavery and freedom; the influence of religious beliefs over behavior; gender roles and sexuality; the relationship between the individual and the community; the relationship between human beings and the environment; accumulation and consumption, wealth and materialism; and the growth of technology.

ENG 620: Novel and Nation 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

This course will examine literary works that attempt to re-figure the nation in the age of globalization. Some of the questions we will ask are: How is the nation represented in literature? What textual strategies do novels employ in order to disseminate the feeling of national consciousness toward readers? Conversely, what formal narrative elements do novels employ to disrupt or displace the official, hegemonic notion of the nation? What kinds of alternative notions of community and belonging are imagined? What are the political implications of postcolonial fiction that resists novelistic techniques that rely on linear notions of historical progression and economic development? How do the forces of globalization put pressure on the fictions of national culture? How have novels gone beyond national borders for paradigms of home(land)? In the end, students will enhance their appreciation of both the limitations and possibilities of a branch of novel theory that takes the nation-form as its primary object of inquiry. 

ENG 660: Directed Reading 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514

The directed reading gives students the opportunity for exploratory reading and research on the developing thesis project and serves as the precursor for the master’s project. Working in conjunction with the thesis advisor, the student undertakes preliminary research and writing, culminating by semester’s end in the approved thesis proposal.

ENG 665: Master’s Project 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG 501, ENG 514, ENG 660

The master’s project is a requirement for the completion of the Master of Arts in English degree. Working with a project advisor, students are expected to complete a project that demonstrates original thought and substantial research, and that may take a number of forms: it may be a critical study of literary works and authors; a theoretical exploration of issues related to literature or writing; or an empirical study of composition and/or pedagogy (for example, a case study, composing process analysis, classroom ethnography, or other fieldwork). It is expected that before writing the thesis, students will have completed the majority of their program requirements.

ENG 691: Independent Study Variable credits

Prerequisites: none

The Independent Study gives students the opportunity to undertake an in-depth study of particular authors, periods, genres, or issues. No more than 3 credit hours of Independent Study may be counted toward graduation requirements.

MTTC Testing

All teacher certification candidates must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) Basic Skills (96) test.

In addition, Marygrove College is recognized by the Michigan Department of Education for competency testing in the following areas at the levels indicated ( E = Elementary; S = Secondary). This will be a guide so that you are sure to take the correct test for certification! Note that competency tests must be taken within 5 years of the time credentials are submitted to the state.

Objectives for each test are on reserve in the Marygrove College Library. Tutoring support can often be arranged through the Teacher Certification Officer.

>> Go to the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification Web site for more information.

>> MTTC Web site Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

** The Elementary Education test certifies teachers for K-5 all subjects and K-8 self-contained classroom. The subject area tests certify elementary teachers from 6-8 and secondary teachers from 7-12.

Master in the Art of Teaching

Master in the Art of Teaching

Earn an MAT Degree at Marygrove College Master in the Art of Teaching

Known for excellence in teaching since 1905, Marygrove College has been offering the convenience of online MAT classes and the flexibility of its Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) online degree program since 1990. Marygrove's MAT degree provides teachers with the opportunity to link the latest developments in educational research to their own teaching practice. The MAT degree program is designed to empower teachers by focusing on the knowledge and skills required to deliver effective instruction to diverse learners from preschool through high school, including those with special needs.

 

With over 28,000 MAT degree graduates from the Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) degree program, Marygrove has a history of serving K-12 teachers with an online MAT program that is relevant to today’s working educators, with outcomes that improve classroom practice and help online MAT degree graduates fulfill their career aspirations. 

The online MAT degree is available as the following programs of study with a focus on:

  • Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment, K-12
  • Elementary Reading & Literacy, K-6
  • Elementary Mathematics, K-5
  • Middle Level Mathematics, 6-8
  • Effective Teaching for the 21st Century

learn-more

 

MTH 505 Problem Solving and Number & Operations, K-5

Based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, this course establishes a foundation of mathematical content knowledge and problem-solving skills. Participants develop deeper understanding of mathematical concepts they are required to teach and engage in mathematical discourse as a means to explain their thinking and share strategies.

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