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Categories starting with I

Institute of Music & Dance (4)

Institute of Music & Dance
The Institute of Music & Dance (IMD) at Marygrove College is a school of the arts. It provides students of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds with high quality, developmentally appropriate programs in music, dance, theater, visual arts, and other performing arts disciplines. The purpose of the IMD is to nurture and harness creativity, strengthen technical and performance skills, and heighten artistic awareness.

Institutes (41)

Institutes
If your idea of learning is to dive right in and experience life firsthand, you'll love these innovative programs in math, science and the arts. Our specialized institutes harness highly experiential avenues of study. Students and teachers build knowledge and skill through a broad spectrum of experiences in mathematics, science, the arts, and a wealth of Detroit-area cultural opportunities.

Art Infused Education (1), Detroit Studies (35), Institute of Music & Dance (4), Science & Math (1)

Integrated Science (3)

Integrated Science
The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Integrated Science is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those candidates seeking certification to teach at the elementary- and/or middle school level. Requirements include 53 credit hours divided among biology, chemistry, earth science, space science, and integrated science.

Interdisciplinary Studies (1)

Interdisciplinary Studies
The first-year seminar (IS 100: Liberal Arts Seminar) introduces students to college life through avenues of self-knowledge; knowledge of Marygrove’s history, mission and place within the broader framework of higher education. The Liberal Arts Seminar is a required course for newly enrolled first year students with less than 32 transfer credits pursuing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Students normally take this course during their first semester at the College.

International Studies (2)

International Studies
This international studies program, coupled with second-language fluency in Arabic, French, or Spanish, is designed to prepare you with the ability to communicate effectively or conduct business in a multicultural and global environment in the US and abroad. As a student in this program, you will develop strong writing and speaking skills in more than one language; you will gain the necessary understanding for interacting and negotiating with a diverse workforce in fields such as sales, the airline and tourism industries, health care, counseling, human resources, communication and public relations, and legal advocacy; and you will be prepared to work within a broad range of industries, governmental agencies, multinational corporations, social organizations, and educational institutions.

Items starting with I

Institute of Music & Dance Mission Statement

The Institute of Music & Dance (IMD) at Marygrove College is a school of the arts. It provides students of all ages, abilities, and backgrounds with high quality, developmentally appropriate programs in music, dance, theater, visual arts, and other performing arts disciplines. The purpose of the IMD is to nurture and harness creativity, strengthen technical and performance skills, and heighten artistic awareness.

Integrated Science Overview

 

CAREER INFORMATION

The Integrated Science Group Major is certifiable by the State of Michigan for K-8 teacher candidates.

Some students may wish to pursue this program to gain an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences.

POTENTIAL CAREERS

Potential careers: Elementary School Teacher, Middle School Teacher, Science Curriculum Consultant, Science Journalist

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Integrated Science is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those candidates seeking certification to teach at the elementary- and/or middle school level. Requirements include 40 credit hours divided among biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, and integrated science.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

The Elementary Integrated Science Program at Marygrove College has been designed to strengthen science teaching in K-8 schools. The Elementary Integrated Science Program coursework emphasizes “the learning of sci­ence through investigation and inquiry”, as called for by the National Science Education Standards. The rationale of the new curriculum design is that our graduates will model their teaching based on how they were taught. The new sequence of courses will provide students with a broad science background as well as an in-depth under­standing of effective and innovative practices in teaching science.

The courses and experiences in the Integrated Science program are organized to develop an understanding of structures, skills, core concepts, ideas, values, facts, methods of inquiry, and uses of technology needed by today’s teachers. The curriculum is designed such that the candidate first gains a broad base of content knowledge and laboratory skills in each of the major scientific disciplines; then the student learns how to integrate content within the sciences as well as throughout non-science disciplines.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM

Program Scheduling

The B.S. in Integrated Science program is primarily a day program, although some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.

Transfer Student Information:

The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines.  However, major coursework older than 10 years, from time of admittance, will be transferred in as elective credit and may not be applied to the major. Students may petition to the department chair for the older credits to be applied towards the major.

Credit for Prior Learning

Learning derived from life experiences and from individual study is of significant academic value and can often be equated with college-level studies.  Students may earn credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experience. Permission of the department chair is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 128 credit hours required for a degree.

Academic Performance Standard

Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Integrated Science major.

Computer Literacy Requirement

Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) must be achieved prior to graduation. Students’ computer literacy will be evaluated and assessed through the Junior and Senior seminar course sequence.

Writing Intensive Requirement

All science majors must take ISC 312: Junior Seminar as their writing intensive course. 

Senior Seminar Requirement

Students must successfully complete ISC 496A and ISC 496B in order to graduate with a B.S. in Integrated Science.

Internship/Cooperative Education

It is strongly encouraged that students participate in a summer undergraduate research experience either with a Marygrove College faculty member, or by securing an off-campus internship or fellowship before they graduate.  Students may receive elective credit for an internship through ISC 388, ISC 488, and/or ISC 491.

Awards

Students may be eligible to win the following departmental awards based on their scholarly work. Integrated Science majors are eligible for the Outstanding Graduating Science Major.  Women in the sciences are also eligible for the Suzanne Fleming Scholarship.  This scholarship is given to a woman who demonstrates financial need, potential in science and on their scholarly work.

 

International Studies Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS

Study Abroad Advisor . Bilingual Assistant • Business Manager • Court & School Mediator • Foreign Service Worker • Publications Manager • Public Relations Expert • Technical & Scientific Writer • Translator • Website Editor

GENERAL INFORMATION

This international studies program, coupled with second-language fluency in Arabic, French, or Spanish, is de­signed to prepare you with the ability to communicate effectively or conduct business in a multicultural and global environment in the US and abroad. As a student in this program, you will develop strong writing and speaking skills in more than one language; you will gain the necessary understanding for interacting and negotiating with a diverse workforce in fields such as sales, the airline and tourism industries, health care, counseling, human resources, communication and public relations, and legal advocacy; and you will be prepared to work within a broad range of industries, governmental agencies, multinational corporations, social organizations, and educa­tional institutions.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION

This degree is offered as a collaborative effort by the Departments of English and Modern Languages, Business, Humanities, Political Science, Sociology, and History. Requirements include core content courses, language courses, and one of two concentrations, not to exceed a total of 72 semester hours, in addition to general educa­tion credits.

CAREER INFORMATION

Here are some of the reasons why you might like to include language study as a part of your professional training.

Arabic

Arabic, which is used by approximately 200 million speakers in 24 Middle Eastern, North African, and Sub-Saharan African countries, is the fifth most spoken language in the world and is quickly becoming one of the most important international languages for business and international relations. Although Arabic is also widely spoken in some parts of the United States, there is a recognized shortage of trained speakers of Arabic in North America.

French

French competes with English and Spanish as a lead­ing “international” language and remains an important tool for anyone who plans to go into international busi­ness or law. French is spoken not only in France, but also by millions of people in 34 other nations around the world in Europe, North America, the Caribbean, and Africa.

Spanish

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world – and in the U.S. The ability to speak Span­ish is a skill applicable to a wide range of careers, both at the domestic and international levels, including law, business, and international trade.

This interdisciplinary degree will prepare you for a wide range of professions. For example, you may seek careers as translators, bilingual assistants, customer service representatives, multinational marketers, inter­national entrepreneurs, business managers, publications managers, web site editors, foreign service workers, coordinators of multi­cultural recruitment, diversity trainers, court and school mediators, agency or foundation administrators, and public relations experts.

This degree can also lead to a variety of graduate fields of studies, for example, International Business, Business Management, Educational Leadership, Hu­man Resources, Professional Communication, Trans­lation, International Studies, Area Studies, Cultural Studies, Intercultural Communication, Cross-Cultural Studies, and Community Counseling.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM

The Translation Certificate Program

While pursuing the bachelor’s degree with the Translation Concentration, you can earn a Translation Certificate if you complete each translation course in the five-course sequence with a grade of B or better.

First-hand Language Experience

You will find that you will get the most out of your language program if you take every opportunity to speak Arabic, French, or Spanish and to immerse yourself in Arabic-, French-, or Spanish-speaking cultures.

A short study abroad experience is one of the core re­quirements for the major. In addition, Marygrove offers semester and summer abroad programs, and credits from these programs can apply to the major with prior approval. Work and volunteer abroad opportunities, summer jobs, and work/study placements can also put you in touch with Arabic, French, and Spanish-speaking people. You might consider part-time jobs with businesses that have Arabic, French, or Spanish international operations.

Prior Language Experience

If you can demonstrate near-native proficiency in French or Spanish (after taking a language proficiency exam, administered by the Modern Languages Pro­gram Director), Marygrove will waive FRE/SPA 151, 250, and 251 for you. In addition, you may substitute three other courses for the required 300-level courses in French or Spanish. You can either take other 300-level French or Spanish courses or take courses in a second foreign language at the 151 level or higher; you can also take three additional Humanities or English classes.

If you can demonstrate near-native proficiency in Arabic or another modern language, you will satisfy the language requirement by taking three classes in a second language at the 151 level or higher, or three additional English writing classes.

You can receive up to 12 hours of modern language credit through the Advanced Placement and CLEP programs (after taking a language proficiency exam, administered by the Modern Languages Program Di­rector), or you may transfer college credit in Spanish, French, Arabic, or other modern languages not offered at Marygrove. 

IMD in the News!

IMD in the News!

Institute of Music and Dance tap students strut their stuff, under the direction of IMD faculty member Marnita Dickerson, at the Charles Wright Museum of African American History. (photo attached Allysa Dickerson, Cienna Boyce, Coda Boyce, Joshua Cooper and Kendall Crenshaw ). They also appeared on the Channel 7 ABC News!

Integrated Science Course Descriptions

BIO 150 Biology I: From Molecules to Cells 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108; Term Fall, Winter Fee: yes. General Education option for science majors only

Biology 150 is a course which, together with Biology 151, is designed to give the student a broad experi­ence in the biological sciences. This course empha­sizes the cellular and molecular aspects of biology. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

BIO 151 Biology II: Unity & Diversity of Life 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108; Term Winter, Fee: yes

This course is designed to give the student a broad experience in the biological sciences. In this course we deal mainly with the organismal and supra-organismal levels of biological organization. Evolution will be the unifying theme. The diversity, form, function, and ecology of organisms will be covered, with particular emphasis on plants and animals. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

BIO 201 Ecology and the Environment 4 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107; Term Fall, Summer. Fee: yes.  General Education option. Cross-listed with ENV 201

This course is a survey of the basic concepts of ecology, natural resources and ecosystems, relationships between humans and their natural environment, and the magnitude and scope of global environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills and use of the scientific method. Laboratory is included.

CHM 130   Chemical Science 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100; ENG 107; LS 105; Fee: yes. Term: Fall, Winter; General Education option

A descriptive and mathematical look at chemistry for the non-scientist. Conceptual development and problem solving are emphasized. Introduction to concepts of chemistry, language and theories for general and organic chemistry. Study of atomic theory, acid-base theories, mole concept and biological molecules. Laboratory included.

ENV 135    Earth Science 4 hours
Prerequisite: LS 105; MTH 099; Term Winter. Fee: yes. General Education option.

Physical and chemical processes related to the past, present and future behavior of the Earth system and the energy systems that drive these processes. The course will focus on the Earth’s materials, the Earth’s surface and the Earth’s interior. Laboratory included.

ENV 300 Weather and Climate 4 hours
Prerequisite: ENV 135; Term Fall; Offered alternate years. Fee: yes. 

This course will orient you to the fundamentals of weather and climate. The course seeks to answer questions such as: Why is there weather in the first place? What drives the movement of air and water around the globe? How do the climates of various places differ, and what factors drive these differences? Why do the great majority of the world’s peoples live near the coasts? How might the climate be changing, and what factors might be driving these changes? Various aspects of meteorology will be dis­cussed, including solar radiation, global circulation, winds, stability, precipitation processes, weather systems, and severe weather. Basic physical principles behind the weather, terminology, and weather analysis will be explored. Laboratory included.

ISC 210 Integrated Science I 4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundational courses; Term Fall Fee: yes. General Education option.

ISC 210 is a course which, together with ISC 211, is designed to give students a broad experience in the natural sciences and help students develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature of science, the evolution of science, how we use science, the role of science in society, and the prospects for science in the future. This course emphasizes the physical science and its interrelatedness to other areas of science. Elementary education and general education students are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

ISC 211 Integrated Science II 4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundational courses; Term Winter Fee: yes. General Education option.

ISC 211 is a course which, together with ISC 210, is designed to give students a broad experience in the natural sciences and help students develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature of science, the evolution of science, how we use science, the role of science in society, and the prospects for science in the future. This course emphasizes the life science, earth science, and their interrelatedness to other areas of science. Elementary education and general education students are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

ISC 312 Junior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter;

Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS.  Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work.  In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports.  The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one.  A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity.  This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 340 Science, Technology and Society 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major; Term TBA;

This course develops students’ awareness of science and technology as human enterprises that take place in a social, environmental, and historical context.  We will examine basic scientific concepts, technological ad­vances, and their impact upon society. Science processes will be examined to illustrate how scientific knowledge is acquired. Advantages and limitations of the scientific method will be considered. The student will construct a grounded theory about the nature of the interaction of Science, Technology, and Society and its role in science education reform. Designed especially for students planning careers as elementary school teachers.

ISC 388 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, Integrated Science  major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ISC 410 Special Topics 3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior status in the major; Term: TBA

Selected topics and issues in biology as chosen by the instructor. 

ISC 488 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, Integrated Science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

ISC 491 Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; Integrated Science major; Junior status; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer

Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 496A Science Senior Seminar: Library Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major; completion of general education and writing requirements; Term: Fall, Winter;

This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project.  Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B.  Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B Science Senior Seminar: Laboratory Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: Yes

This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member.  The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

PHY 135 Conceptual Physics 4 hours
Prerequisite: MTH 100; LS 105; Fee: yes; Term: Winter; Offered alternate years. General Education option;

A descriptive and mathematical look at physics for the non-scientist. Conceptual development and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Includes the study of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism. Laboratory included.

PHY 200 Exploring The Universe 2 hours
Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental and foundational courses; Term: Fall; Offered alternate years

This course presents an introduction to the field of Astronomy, including the current investigations for life on other planets. This 2 credit course consists of 12 lessons. Course topics include modern methods of observational astronomy, an overview of the scientific method, age and origin of the Solar System, descriptions of the planets and discussions of the possibility of life on other planets.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies Course Descriptions

IS 100                                Liberal Arts Seminar                                                                                                          3 hours

The Liberal Arts Seminar is designed for first year students as an introduction to college life in general and to a Marygrove education in particular. Through exposure to various dimensions of the liberal arts and exposure to a number of social issues, students gain self-knowledge; academic and personal success skills; and an understanding of Marygrove’s history, mission and place within the broader framework of higher education. This course includes guest presentations, field trips and attendance at cultural events.

IS 100H                             Honors Liberal Arts Seminar                                                                                             3 hours

Prerequisites: Admission into Honors Program.

Through a liberal use of guest speakers, out of class activities and special readings, the students in this seminar will focus on leadership development and ways of knowing. The course will assist each participant in knowing themselves, knowing the College and its mission, knowing various approaches to the acquisition of knowledge within the disciplines and knowing how to make the most of their Marygrove experience. At the same time, opportunities will be created for the study and exercise of leadership.

IS 320A                                 Detroit Seminar: Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis                                      3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

In this course, we apply ideas from economics and literature to the study of contemporary issues in Detroit. We pay particular attention to several key factors influencing the city’s present condition. These include: race and inequality, federal urban policy, corporate de-industrialization, economic globalization, and local and regional development. Seminar sessions consist of discussions involving all members of the class and presentations by individual faculty and students. In our discussions, we will respond to assigned readings based upon our own experiences of life in and around Detroit. Presentations will focus on specific topics which are the products of our research. The course will include guest presentations, films, and a tour of specific sites which are important to our discussions.

IS 320B-HY                           Detroit Seminar: Cultural Icons of Detroit                                                                                            3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This interdisciplinary seminar combines an examination of landmark Detroit institutions in the context of American urbanization. The course includes study of sociological/historical context, architectural structure, and the cultural experience. Course includes visits to institutions such as Detroit Institute of Arts, Orchestra Hall, Detroit Historical Museum, and the Wright Museum. Instruction combines in-class instruction, online preparation, and site visits.

IS 322A                                 Technology Seminar: Human Communication and Technological Change                    3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course will explore the co-evolution of communication and technology. Other technological benchmark events, such as language, domestication of animals, evolution of writing and weapons will be explored. A focus of this course is to understand the success and collapse of civilizations based on their adaptation to and use of various technologies.

IS 322B                                 Technology Seminar: Toward an Interdisciplinary Philosophy of Technology              3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; one Lab Science; 1 course in HIS, HUM, or SOC; junior/senior status.

This course explores the development of technology in relationship to a variety of disciplines. The main objective is to give students an understanding of how technology influences and is influenced by all facets of our society.

IS 322C                                 Technology Seminar: Science, Technology and Society                                                                                    3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course develops students’ awareness of science and technology as human enterprises that take place in a social, environmental, and historical context.  We will examine basic scientific concepts, technological ad­vances, and their impact upon society. Science processes will be examined to illustrate how scientific knowledge is acquired. Advantages and limitations of the scientific method will be considered. The student will construct a grounded theory about the nature of the interaction of Science, Technology, and Society and its role in science education reform. Designed especially for students planning careers as elementary school teachers. (cross-listed with ISC 340)

IS 324A                                 Social Justice Seminar: Why Does America Neglect Its Children?                               3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course examines specific social justice issues as they relate to a variety of disciplines. The emphasis is on the critical thinking skills necessary for problem-solving and decision-making in our complex society.

IS 324B                                 Social Justice Seminar: Global Women’s Issues                                                                                                3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course is an interdisciplinary study of women’s issues in the context of social justice. Personal reflection, social analysis, evaluation of cultural/religious values, and identification of action plans will provide the structure for examining issues related to women. While topic areas may change, some of the women’s issues to be explored are biological/personality influences on women’s roles, cross-cultural variations in women’s status, and discrimination in politics and education.

IS 324C                                 Social Justice Seminar: Environmental Policy                                                                                       3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course is intended as a simple, practical introduction to America’s environmental politics, policies, and regulations. It will explore basic environmental science concepts such as ecology, ecosystems, and pollution—which policy makers, regulators, organizations and citizens need to understand. It will answer questions such as: who develops the environmental regulations, what are examples of these regulations, are the regulations and politicians focusing on the most important priorities? How efficient are environmental policies, and can laws balance economic concerns with environmental protection? What are the environmental concerns in Michigan and the Metropolitan Detroit area?

IS 324D                                Social Justice Seminar: Government in Action                                                                                      3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This course examines specific social justice issues as they relate to a variety of disciplines. The emphasis is on the critical thinking skills necessary for problem-solving and decision-making in our complex society. It is an interdisciplinary study of social policy combining classroom and fieldwork in the context of social justice. Students will learn to apply key components of public policy to state and local government forum settings.

IS 324E                                 Social Justice Seminar: African-American Struggles                                                                              3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This Social Justice seminar will combine traditional instruction with a travel seminar experience. Students will investigate social justice issues of slavery, discrimination, and segregation. An interdisciplinary approach will emphasize African-American history from slavery passage to civil rights movement and the psychological styles of coping with deprivation and discrimination. A week-long travel seminar will enable students to connect the African-American experience with sites visited in Virginia and North Carolina.

IS 326AH                           Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar: Religion and Science                                                                          3 hours

Prerequisites: Honors students only, or permission of instructors; recommended: 1 natural science/lab course, 1 religious studies course, and basic computer literacy. Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status.

This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on issues at the border between science and religion, with emphasis on the physical and life sciences rather than the social sciences. Such topics are often the most exciting place for new insights and discoveries; they also tend to illustrate the differences and similarities between religion and science. At these “frontiers” conflicts and contradictions also appear.

We will examine a number of points of convergence and explore the various ways in which religious believers and scientific investigators approach these topics. We will seek to understand both past and current interactions between science and religion, and we will look for ways in which both religion and science contribute to our overall knowledge. At the same time, we will learn to better appreciate both the distinctiveness and the complementarities of these diverse ways of knowing.

IS 326B                              Travel Seminar                                                                                                                              3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status or permission of instructors.

The travel seminar is a study of a specific city, country or regional area and generally includes exposure to the geography, history, culture and achievements of the location. Each travel seminar considers the locale from a unique perspective, dependent upon the expertise of the involved faculty members. All seminars include travel outside the U.S. and some include a Service Learning component.

IS 326C                              HIV/AIDS: Its Biological and Social Impact                                                                                    3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; junior/senior status or permission of instructors.

This course is a biological, psychological, social and literary interdisciplinary examination of HIV/AIDS. The focus is on the impact of HIV/AIDS on individuals, families and communities. Communities of color will be emphasized. A required academic service learning activity focuses on HIV/AIDS outreach to churches, senior residences/centers, schools and agencies.

IS 326G/GH                       Globalization in Context                                                                                                       3 hours

Prerequisites: ENG 108; Honors students only, or permission of instructors; junior/senior status.

This course will explore the world phenomenon of globalization in order to better understand and participate in the profound and rapid changes that it generates. We will study globalization from a variety of perspectives -- political, social, economic, cultural, environmental – and their interconnections. Does this globalizing process move towards increased diversity or homogeneity, towards inclusion or marginalization, towards global justice or injustice, towards enhanced democracy or uncontrolled market dominance? At the end of the course we will also explore how we can make globalization work.

Institute of Science and Math Education

Progam Contact
Dr. Sally Welch
LA Bldg., Rm 301
8425 W. McNichols
Detroit, MI 48221
Phone: 313.927.1319
Email:swelch@marygrove.edu
 

How does the Institute of Science and Mathematics Education help teachers teach science?
1. Prepare Effective K-12 Science Teachers

Goal: Prepare K-12 teacher education candidates in the content and practice of science as well as the principles and best practices of imaginative science education. This goal will be met by implementing several American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recommendations regarding the preparation of prospective science teachers.

AAAS recommends that undergraduate teacher education programs be restructured to better prepare candidates in subject matter content and in pedagogical practice, and that college classrooms and laboratories should themselves be models of innovative teaching strategies

Mastery of science content must be ensured
That teachers should have command of the subject matter they teach may seem a statement of the obvious, but the percent of higher education institutions requiring students to take at least one course in the natural sciences dropped from 70 percent in 1964 to 34 percent in 1993. Colleges and universities with a lab science general education requirement dropped from 79 percent in 1964 to 30 percent in 1993. The absence of serious attention to science literacy at the college level is compounded by the fact that most science and mathematics in the elementary grades is taught by generalists who majored in elementary education and who were not exposed to all four natural science areas (physics, biology, chemistry, and geology).

The implications are clear in terms of the quality of science education in many self-contained classrooms. If a child is convinced that the seasons change because of Earth’s changing distance from the sun, it requires excellent knowledge of science and how science is learned to help a child understand the complex and often counterintuitive scientific principles that explain phenomena. At the very least, it is crucial that all science teachers are literate enough in science to address their students’ personal conceptions of scientific phenomena.

Intensive study of a science discipline increases the likelihood that future teachers will be able to understand science at a deep conceptual level and to reflect on important ideas, theories, and applications. AAAS and an increasing number of school districts strongly recommend that prospective science teachers — middle as well as high school — major in science. 

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