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Categories starting with H

Human Resource Management Certificate (1)

Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management
The graduate certificate program in Human Resource Management helps practicing HRM specialists or other organization staff members moving into HRM to advance their knowledge and skills in the field.
The Human Resource Management graduate certificate program focuses upon the practice of human resource management in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Courses offer both concept and skill components designed to help students base practice on solid theoretical grounding.
Human Resource Management Certificate

Human Resource Management Masters (1)

The Master of Arts degree and graduate certificate programs in Human Resource Management help practicing HRM specialists or other organization staff members moving into HRM to advance their knowledge and skills in the field.
Human Resource Management Masters

Health Science (7)

If you have a passion for science and helping others, a career in health sciences could be for you. The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in Health Science is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those students seeking employment in a health-related field.
Health Science

History (5)

The Department of History offers undergraduate majors and minors which provide a strong background in American history and world history. In addition to the required core courses, as a history student you may choose courses from four areas: United States, African-American, and world history. Although some introductory and upper division courses are offered in the evening, most courses that satisfy the requirements for a major in history are offered during the day.
History

Humanities (3)

The Department of Humanities offers undergraduate courses that provide an understanding of ideas, ideals, values, and beliefs as expressed through arts and letters of global cultures. The introductory and core courses—Humanities 150‚ 257 and 258—focus on global arts and ideas. Other courses focus on specific cultural areas, topics, or media.
Humanities

Items starting with H

Health Science Overview

CAREER INFORMATION
If you have a passion for science and helping others, a career in health sciences could be for you. Graduates from the Health Science program have a wide variety of career opportunities available to them. Marygrove’s graduates are working as nurses, laboratory technicians, physician assistants, physical therapists, research assistants in hospitals and universities, sales representative, public health workers, and supervisors in the health care industry.

POTENTIAL CAREERS
• Administration (health care managers, case managers, supervisors, patient care services, medical staff relations)
• Clerical (Health Unit Coordinator, Medical record keeper, hospital clerk)
• Clinical Laboratory Science (cytotechnologist, histotechnologist, laboratory technician, medical assistant, clinical lab scientist)
• Communication (biomedical illustrator, biostatistician, healthcare interpreter, health science writer)
• Counseling (clinical social worker, alcohol/drug counselor, patient advocate; hospice worker)
• Healthcare (nurse, nurse assistant, nurse practitioner, physical/occupational therapist, dental hygienist, dietician, physician assistant, physical therapist, chiropractor)
• Public Health (epidemiologist, toxicologist, environmental/occupational health worker, healthcare educator)

GENERAL INFORMATION
This degree can serve as a springboard for graduate work in a specific health-related field or lead to various occupations in the health field. The Health Science program is an interdisciplinary group major consisting of coursework in biology, chemistry, mathematics, social science, business, and health science. No minor is required.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The Health Science program offers three different Bachelor degree programs. All programs are designed to provide you with the breadth and depth of a health science curriculum. Foundational core courses have been selected to establish a broad base of study while allowing flexibility and opportunities to pursue your specific interests by choosing three different program concentrations. The Bachelor of Science degree program in Health Science with a Preprofessional Concentration is designed for those students seeking employment in a health-related field. Graduates will be prepared to enter the workplace, receive additional career specific training, or pursue a graduate or doctoral degree, if desired, in the health sciences or health professions. The Bachelor of Arts degree program in Health Science with a concentration in Community Wellness and Public Health is designed to provide the student with a broad-based science curriculum with interdisciplinary components for those students wishing to pursue a career or advanced degree in public health, community health or health-related community advocacy. The Bachelor of Arts degree program in Health Science with a concentration in Health Care Management is targeted for those students seeking employment in health care administration/ management or related fields. A Health Care Management minor is also offered.

Students who have an interest in Health Science but do not have enough time to complete the major may wish to consider a minor in Health Science. A minor in Health Science provides you with the knowledge and skills to complement your major area of study while expanding career options.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Program Scheduling
The B.S. and B.A. programs in Health Science are primarily day programs, although some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.

Transfer Student Information:
The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines. However, major coursework older than 10 years, from time of admittance, will be transferred in as elective credit and may not be applied to the major. Students may petition to the department chair for the older credits to be applied towards the major.

Credit for Prior Learning
Learning derived from life experiences and from individual study is of significant academic value and can often be equated with college-level studies. Students may earn credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experience. Permission of the department chair is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 120 credit hours required for a degree.

Academic Performance Standard
Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Health Science major and minor. Computer Literacy Requirement Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) must be achieved prior to graduation. Students’ computer literacy will be evaluated and assessed through the Junior and Senior seminar course sequence.

Computer Literacy Requirement
Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) must be achieved prior to graduation. Students’ computer literacy will be evaluated and assessed through the Junior and Senior seminar course sequence.

Writing Intensive Requirement
All science majors must take ISC 312: Junior Seminar as their writing intensive course. 

Senior Seminar Requirement
Students must successfully complete ISC 496A and ISC 496B in order to graduate with a Bachelor's in Health Science.

Internship/Cooperative Education
It is strongly encouraged that students participate in a summer undergraduate research experience either with a Marygrove College faculty member, or by securing an off-campus internship or fellowship before they graduate. Students may receive elective credit for an internship through HSC 388, HSC 488, and/or HSC 491.

Awards
Students may be eligible to win the following departmental awards based on their scholarly work. The Natural Sciences Department Award is given to the outstanding graduating science major. Women in the sciences are also eligible for the Suzanne Fleming Scholarship. This scholarship is given to a woman who demonstrates financial need, potential in science and on their scholarly work.

Pre-nursing Partnership
Marygrove College offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Health Science (Pre-professional concentration) that contains all of the prerequisites for Oakland University’s Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Marygrove College and Oakland University offer the opportunity to transition into an accelerated one-year program of study leading to a BSN degree. Once the BSN is completed at Oakland University students are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN exam, and will have obtained two bachelor degrees. Students must be in good standing at Marygrove College and meet all of the pre-admission screening requirements to qualify for admission into the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program at Oakland University’s School of Nursing. Note that completion of the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the nursing program at Oakland University. For further information, contact Dr. Jeanne Andreoli, Chair, Division of Natural Sciences & Mathematics.

History Course Descriptions

HIS 252 United States to 1877 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105; ENG 107 recommended. General Education option
Social‚ political and economic development of the United States from the American Revolution through Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIS 253 United States Since 1877 3 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105; ENG 107 recommended.
General Education option Social‚ political and economic development of the United States since Reconstruction with a particular focus on U.S. foreign policy and reform movements.

HIS 255 World History I 4 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105; ENG 107 recommended. General Education option
Examines the major civilizations of Africa‚ Asia and Europe up to 1000 AD‚ with a particular emphasis on the interrelated development of economic and social structures‚ states‚ law and religions.

HIS 256 World History II 4 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105; ENG 107 recommended. General Education option
Examines the history of Africa‚ Asia and Europe‚ as well as the European conquest of America‚ since 1000 AD. Emphasis on the formation of economic‚ social and political structures.

HIS 300 Special Topics in History 1-3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108
Selected topics and issues in history as chosen by the instructor.

HIS 306 The World in the 20th Century 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 253, 256, or 303 recommended
The history of interstate conflict, social revolution, and global economic change in the 20th century.

HIS 309 American Society After World War II 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 253 recommended
Political and social developments in the post-war era. This can serve as a writing intensive course for history majors.

HIS 310 Metro Detroit Through Three Centuries 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or 253 recommended. Fee: yes
The history of Detroit and its metropolitan area from 1701 to the present.

HIS 311 History of Blacks in America to 1865 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108; HIS 252 recommended. General Education option
The history of American blacks from early African origins through the periods of slavery and Civil War.

HIS 312 History of Blacks in America Since 1865 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or HIS 253 recommended. General Education option
The history of American blacks since the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIS 314 Native American History I 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or HIS 256 recommended.
The history of Native Americans in North America from pre-contact to the 1830s.

HIS 315 Native American History II 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 253 recommended
The history of Native Americans in North America since the 1830s.

HIS 316 Liberalism, Communism and Fascism 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 256 recommended
The intellectual, political, and social origins and development of modern ideologies.

HIS 320 Vietnam 4 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 253 or 256 recommended. General Education option
The history of Vietnam from ancient times through French colonization and the 20th century revolutionary wars for independence against France and the United States. This can serve as a writing intensive course for history majors.

HIS 321 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 256 or 303 recommended
This course focuses on the historical roots of Nazi ideology and the evolution of the racial policies of Hitler’s regime, culminating in the genocide directed against the Jewish people. Includes a class visit to the Holocaust Memorial Center.

HIS 323 Genocide in the Modern World 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 256 recommended
An examination of the causes and patterns of the systematic destruction – including extermination – of national, racial, religious, and ethnic groups in the twentieth century. Coverage ranges from Armenia and the Holocaust to Cambodia, East Timor, Rwanda, and “ethnic cleansing” in the Balkans.

HIS 325 American Foreign Policy 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108, introductory course in HIS or POL; Term: 2
Analysis and evaluation of the goals and instruments of U.S. foreign policy in the post-World War II period.

HIS 330 Michigan: History and Politics 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108, one course in social science
Development of sub-federal political institutions: states, counties, municipal corporations, school districts, and regional governments. Emphasizing the Michigan experience, the political system will be examined within the framework of major historical eras, population patterns, and economic developments.

HIS 335 Women in U. S. History 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or 253 recommended.
General Education option A history of women in America from colonial times to the present. This can serve as a writing intensive course for history majors.

HIS/ECN 340 American Labor History 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 252 or 253 recommended.
General Education option The history of the working class and trade union movement in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present. This can serve as a writing intensive course for history majors.

HIS/ECN 345 Problems in American 3 hours
Economic History Prerequisites: ENG 108, ECN 200 or 202
The process of American economic development; historical roots of contemporary economic problems.

HIS 347 Methods of Teaching History and Social Studies 3 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of the history department, instructor, 2.7 GPA in teaching major; and admission to Teacher Certification program
Philosophical basis, objectives, materials, curriculum planning and techniques of instruction for teaching the Social Sciences at the middle school (grades 7-8) and at the high school level.

HIS 359 History of Civil Rights 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; HIS 253 recommended
This course focuses on one of the most crucial decades in American history: the Civil Rights Movement (1954-1965). Historical, political, social and religious aspects of the movement are examined in documentary material. The course considers events preceding and succeeding the Civil Rights Movement and discusses strategies to achieve social justice. The human effects of social change and the relationship between the black freedom movement and all Americans are explored.

HIS 388 Cooperative Field Work Experience 2-6 hours
Prerequisites: Departmental approval; Term: 1, 2
Supervised work experience in an activity related to area of specialization, planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor, and employer.

HIS 393 Radicalism in 20th Century America 3 hours
Prerequisite: ENG 108; HIS 253 recommended
Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between the domestic U.S. events of the last 30 years and the earlier roots of radical social, economic, and political behaviors.

HIS 491 Independent Study 3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Permission of instructor; junior status recommended
In-depth advanced research on student-selected topic in consultation with faculty.

HIS 492 Readings Seminar in History 2-3 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 108; Permission of instructor; junior status recommended
Readings, discussion and research on a fundamental problem in history.

HIS 496 Senior Research Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: History major; senior status or permission of instructor; must have completed 80 percent of history course requirements; ENG 312; and history writing intensive course. IS 320A Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis is recommended.
In-depth historical research on or related to the history of Detroit. Students are required to write an extensive research paper and make an oral presentation to the history department.

HIS 496S Social Science Senior Seminar: 3 hours
History Concentration Prerequisites: Social Science or Social Studies major; senior standing or permission of instructor; must have completed 80 percent of history concentration; ENG 312 and the writing intensive course in area concentration. (HIS 309, HIS 320, HIS 335, HIS 340). IS 320A Detroit and the Contemporary Urban Crisis recommended.
Senior research seminar for social science majors with history and political science concentrations. In-depth research and writing on a history or political science topic related to Detroit.

HIS 498 Field Work 1-3 hours
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, History major; senior status recommended
Practical application of classroom education and skills in a related work experience; professionally supervised.

 

History Minor

The history minor consists of 20 hours.

A. Required Core Courses
HIS 252 U.S. to 1877
HIS 253 U.S. Since 1877
HIS 255 World History I
HIS 256 World History II

B. Upper-level Courses to Complete the Minor

Humanities Overview

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Department of Humanities offers undergraduate courses that provide an understanding of ideas, ideals, values, and beliefs as expressed through global arts and letters. The core courses – Humanities 150‚ 257 and 258 – explore global ideas and values. Other courses emphasize specific geo-cultural areas, genres, or media.

CAREER INFORMATION
An ability to understand and analyze global ideas and values enables us to assume leadership roles in our communities, at work and throughout the world. Humanities courses help develop skills of questioning, comparison, analysis and judgment that are useful in work requiring creativity, critical thinking, teamwork, and decision-making. Exploring global cultures also provides new insights into one’s own heritage. Humanities is an enriching field of study for those planning to work in education, the arts, literature, social sciences, human services, community leadership, or international business.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
All Humanities courses incorporate specific leadership skills, including Sustainability and Participatory Action Research perspectives.

 

History Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Archival Management • Business • Government Service • Journalism • Law • Museum Management • Teaching

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Arts with a History Major (30 required credit hours) will provide students with a solid understanding of American and World history. In addition to the required courses in United States and World history, students may choose elective courses in their particular area of interest. Through the study of history, students not only gain an understanding of past human activities, but they also develop skills in research, writing, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. This background will prepare the student for success in a variety of careers including government service, teaching, law, business, journalism, and museum and archival management. A minor in history (20 credit hours) provides students with a solid base in American and World history.

Program Scheduling
While the required introductory courses are offered in the day and evening, most courses that satisfy the requirements for a major in history are offered during the day.

Specialized Accreditation
The Department of History offers a history major and minor for secondary teacher certification. Additional requirements are detailed in the Secondary Teaching Certification section.

Special Elements of the Program
Detroit Emphasis: the department offers several courses that examine aspects of the history of Detroit: HIS 310 (Metro Detroit through Three Centuries), HIS 330 (Michigan: History and Politics), and HIS 496 (Senior Research Seminar).

Awards
The Jorge Castellanos Award is an annual award given to a history major for academic excellence and demonstrated ability in research and writing. The award is given at the College’s annual Honors Convocation.

Humanities Group Minor

The Humanities Group Minor requires a minimum of 24 credit hours of courses In Humanities and closely related disciplines. Twelve credit hours must be in Humanities and must include HUM 257 and HUM 258. The twelve additional credit hours may be in Humanities or in closely related disciplines: philosophy, literature, comparative religious studies, history, art, art history, dance, music, cinema, theatre arts, or specified interdisciplinary or travel seminars. A maximum of six credit hours in each discipline can be counted toward the group minor. A student may complete a Humanities group minor through evening and online courses. See department chair for Plan of Work.

A. Required Courses
HUM 257 Humanities of the Ancient World
HUM 258 Humanities of the Modern World

B. Humanities Electives
HUM 150 Contemporary Cultural Studies
HUM 275 Popular Culture
HUM 303 Black Film
HUM 315 Theater Detroit
HUM 330 Arab and Islamic Humanities
HUM 332 Latin American Humanities
HUM 333A African Humanities I
HUM 334 African-American Aesthetics
HUM 335 Caribbean Humanities
HUM 491 Independent Study

C. Related Electives
Related electives include: philosophy, literature, comparative religious studies, history, art, art history, dance, music, cinema, and theatre arts. A maximum of six credit hours in each discipline can be counted toward the group minor. Many religious studies courses are not acceptable for Teacher Certification. See department chair.

Health Care Management Minor

A minor in health care management consists of the following components:

BUS 173     Introduction to Business 3 credits
ACC 224     Accounting I 4 credits
ACC 351*   Finance and Budgeting for Health Care Managers 4 credits
BIO 118              Medical Terminology 2 credits
HSC/BUS 321     Health Care Informatics 2 credits
HSC/BUS 335     Health Care Coding 3 credits
HSC/BUS 336*   Health Care Management 3 credits
BUS 444              Project Management
3 credits

*Courses are currently under development and pending approval

RELATED DISCIPLINE REQUIREMENT
PHL 225/228      Ethics/Ethics in the Health Professions 3 credits

Health Science Course Descriptions

HSC 101 Topics in Health Care 3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108, Term: Winter
This course uses a research approach to focus on issues affecting healthcare in America. Topics include the sociological, psychological, economic, environmental, and ethical impact on health and the problems facing healthcare professionals. Fieldwork is required.

HSC 320 Nutrition & Exercise for Wellness 3 hours
Prerequisite: CHM 230, BIO 271, BIO 272 Term: Fall, Winter
Study of exercise, wellness and nutrition for pre-health professional students to provide skills necessary to determine nutritional needs, status, and habits of clients, throughout the lifespan and the health-illness continuum. The relationships between macronutrient intake, metabolism, exercise, and weight loss will also be explored. Teaching methodologies will include: lecture, discussion, case studies with application of the healthcare process and formulation of care plans.

HSC 321 Health Care Informatics 2 hours
Prerequisite: BUS 308 or ISC 312; Term: Winter
This course will establish the foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing informatics in a healthcare environment. Healthcare informatics models and theories and the sciences that support it will be reviewed. The use of information technology to support decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care, and concerns about protecting information and system integrity are addressed. Course assignments focus on healthcare applications.

HSC 327 Pathophysiology 4 hours
Prerequisite: BIO 150, BIO 271, BIO 272, BIO 321; Term: Fall, Winter
The course will concentrate on how physiological functions of humans are modified by internal and external environmental stressors. Underlying concepts and principles common to health deviations in all major physiological systems are presented. Knowledge gained from this course will provide the student with rationale for clinical decision making. The teaching methodology for the class is lecture and class discussion.

HSC 388 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, Health Science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

HSC 398 Introduction to Epidemiology 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIO 150, PSY305; Term: Winter (even)
Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease, or other health-related outcomes, in human and animal populations. This course introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology, epidemiologic research, and introduces you to the findings of epidemiologic research in key aspects of health and disease; including chronic and infectious disease epidemiology, social epidemiology, outbreak investigation, properties of tests, and study design and surveillance.

HSC 408 Pharmacology 4 hours
Prerequisite: BIO 150, BIO 271, BIO 272, BIO 321, HSC 327, CHM 230, MTH 103; Term: Fall, Winter
This course presents the basic principles of pharmacology needed to safely care for patients. Emphasis is placed on concepts of pharmacology that guide all drug use; major classes of drugs with emphasis on mechanisms of actions; and patient care implications.

HSC 450 Community Advocacy & Public Health 4 hours
Prerequisite: POL/SOC/SW 385; Term: Fall (even)
Students will be introduced to community health concepts, resources, and skills related to the role and responsibilities of a Community Health Advocate locally, nationally, and globally. Special emphasis will be placed on factors to consider when working in community-based settings; legislative and legal processes in local, state, and national health policy; characteristics of health models and plans; impact of culture and socioeconomic status on individual’s health, assessment of community issues from a health lens; communication; barriers to health care services; and related community resources. Particular skills include coalition development, developing a constituency/partnerships, advocacy, team building, and leadership. A practicum with a community partner is required.

HSC 488 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, Health Science major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required. HSC 491 Independent Study 1-4 hours Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; Health Science major; Junior status; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 312 Junior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter
Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS. Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work. In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports. The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one. A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity. This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 496A Science Senior Seminar: Library Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major. Term: Fall, Winter
This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project. Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B. Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B Science Senior Seminar: 2 hours
Laboratory Research Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member. The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

Human Resource Management Masters

Master of Arts in Human Resource Management

Master of Arts in Human Resource Management
The Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management helps practicing HRM specialists or other organization staff members moving into HRM to advance their knowledge and skills in the field.

The Human Resource Management graduate program focuses upon the practice of human resource management in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Courses offer both concept and skill components designed to help students base practice on solid theoretical grounding. Courses are led by faculty members who have earned advanced graduate degrees and/or possess significant experience in the fields of business, organization behavior, and human resources.

Marygrove's Master of Arts in Human Resource Management aligns with the recommended requirements for HR degree programs as outline by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

Program Requirements

The Master of Arts degree consists of 12 (36 credit hours) courses. There are three required courses (9 credit hours): Business Ethics, Managerial Finance and the Seminar and Project (Capstone Course). The other nine courses (27 credit hours) are chosen from a variety of electives in Human Resource Management and Organizational Development classes. In order to graduate, students must have an overall grade point average of 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or higher.

Admission Requirements

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum 3.0 grade point average
  • Completed application*
  • Official Transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed
  • Career Plan/Writing Sample
  • Current Resume
  • Minimum of two recommendations: current employer and academic or work setting
  • Interview with program chair

*Application fees may apply

Curriculum & Schedule
The Required core courses are offered annually, while electives are rotated every other year. The majority of classes are 7 weeks in length with 2-3 classes scheduled per semester.

The curriculum consists of courses in HRM functions of recruiting, employment law/compliance, ethics, finance, HR information systems, communications, organizational behavior/change, diversity and compensation.

The capstone provides students with the unique opportunity to integrate their studies through a team based Human Resource Simulation. The simulation requires the development of strategy, priority setting and operational decision making in a business setting.

Features of the Program
The Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Management helps HRM specialists or other organizational professionals advance their knowledge and skills in the field. The program focuses on HRM practices in the private, public and nonprofit sectors. Courses offer both concept and skill components designed to help students develop practices based on solid theoretical grounding.

Specific Program Information
The Master of Arts in Human Resource Management is designed as a fully on-line program to be completed in 6 semesters (2 calendar years), based on the completion of two courses per semester. However the curriculum is flexible and allows students to complete the degree more rapidly or slowly. Students wishing to enroll in more than two courses per semester can do so with permission of the program chair. However the program must be completed within a period of six years from the time of initial enrollment.

The programs are led by faculty with advanced graduate degrees and /or possess significant experience in the fields of business, organization behavior and human resources.

Career Information

Students and alumni are engaged in a variety of organizational roles in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Many are engaged in human resource management as staff specialists such as: Human Resource Generalists, Recruiting Specialists, Benefit Coordinators, Compliance Officers, Employee Development and Retention Officers, Corporate Talent Acquisition and Retention Managers, General Managers, Management/HR Consultants, Organizational Change Consultants and Managers, and Corporate Trainers.

Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate, a student must have completed 36 hours (master's degree) of work in approved courses with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or higher. A complete description of all applicable graduation requirements is included in the Academic Policies section of this catalog and on the Marygrove College website.

For More Information, Contact:
G. Jerry van Rossum, MA, MBA
Assistant Professor and Chair, Professional Studies Business Division
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
313.927.1218

At a Glance

REQUIRED COURSES (9 Credits)

  • Managerial Finance*
  • Business Ethics*
  • Capstone Seminar and Project* ELECTIVES (27 Credits)
  • Organization Theory and Change**
  • Leadership and Decision Making***
  • Communication for Managers***
  • Human Resource Information System**
  • Human Behavior in Organizations***
  • Human Resource Management**
  • Legal Practices in Employment***
  • Employee Recruitment, Selection, and Evaluation***
  • Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining***
  • Employee Development**
  • Compensation and Benefits**

* indicates courses offered every year
** indicates courses offered only in odd numbered years
*** indicates courses offered in even numbered years

Required Courses

HRM 505: Managerial Finance

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Focuses upon the reporting of financial operations and position, the preparation and utilization of financial data for internal applications and budget preparation, with emphasis on forecasting. Required.

HRM 655: Business Ethics

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Explores social responsibility theories on classical business ideology, including the influence of values on individual behavior and organizational corporate citizenship. Studies a conceptual framework for moral development and conceptual reasoning processes. Examines specific organizational ethics issues and the management of integrity. Required.

HRM 665: Capstone Seminar and Project

3 credits

Prerequisite: completion of 24 hours of approved course work with an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Integrates student learning from program course work through a team-based HRM decision-making simulation requiring strategy development and operational decision making in a business setting. Required.

Elective Courses

HRM 512: Organization Theory and Change

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Surveys theories and principles of organization and the management of change. Focuses upon organization development—the application of behavioral science knowledge to help organizations improve productivity and the quality of work life. Stresses the role of the individual organization member, human resource practitioner, or manager as change agent.

HRM 515: Leadership and Decision Making

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Surveys leadership theories, examines interpersonal, intra- and inter-group influence processes, and assesses individual leadership and decision-making styles.

HRM 517: Communication for Managers

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Introduces concepts and skills required for professional communication in organizational settings. Explores strategies and techniques for effective communication through writing, individual interviews, and group interaction.

HRM 519: Human Resource Information Systems

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Examines the role of technology in support of strategic aspects of human resource management. Also focuses on the use of information systems and decision-making applications for data collection, retrieval, and analysis within Human Resource functional areas for human resource allocation and planning.

HRM 525: Human Behavior in Organizations

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Applies behavioral and social science theories to the analysis of individual, interpersonal and group behavior in the workplace and to the development of workforce management practice. Topics include the impact on workplace behavior of individual attitude, perception, and motivation; group dynamics; and organization and work design. Special attention is given to implications of behavioral and social science knowledge for human resource management practice.

HRM 535: Human Resource Management

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Surveys the development of human resource management as a field of practice in organizations. Explores trends and emerging issues which may shape future practice.

HRM 555: Legal Practices in Employment

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Focuses upon compliance of employment practices with laws and regulations in force. Emphasizes implications of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) and related laws and regulations on recruitment, selection, accommodation, evaluation, and other workforce management policies and practices.

HRM 565: Employee Recruitment, Selection, and Evaluation

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Examines the design and management of personnel recruitment, selection, and evaluation procedures as means for improving individual and organizational performance. Emphasizes tools and skills for employment and performance appraisal activities.

HRM 625: Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Explores the rationale for, processes of, and environmental forces affecting union-management relations. Topics include labor law, negotiation and administration of labor agreements, and resolution of grievances.

HRM 635: Employee Development

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Surveys approaches and processes adopted by organizations to train and develop employees at all levels. Explores training design and delivery, training technology innovations, and career management.

HRM 675: Compensation and Benefits

3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Examines compensation practices and issues related to employee productivity and satisfaction. Surveys methods for determining equity of compensation and the variety of approaches for providing employee benefits.

Human Resource Management Certificate

Certificate in Human Resource Management (Jerry van Rossum)

Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management
The graduate certificate program in Human Resource Management helps practicing HRM specialists or other organization staff members moving into HRM to advance their knowledge and skills in the field.
The Human Resource Management graduate certificate program focuses upon the practice of human resource management in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Courses offer both concept and skill components designed to help students base practice on solid theoretical grounding. Courses are led by faculty members who have earned advanced graduate degrees and/or possess significant experience in the fields of business, organization behavior, and human resources.
Marygrove's graduate certificate in Human Resource Management aligns with the recommended requirements for HR degree programs as outline by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
The Graduate Certificate consists of 6 (18 credit hours) and is designed to meet the student’s career and professional interests in either Human Resource Management or Organizational Development. Students should meet with the program chair to discuss the best options to meet the student’s needs.

In order to graduate, students must have an overall average 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or higher.

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum 3.0 grade point average
  • Completed application*
  • Official Transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed
  • Career Plan/Writing Sample
  • Current Resume
  • Minimum of two recommendations: current employer and academic or work setting
  • Interview with program chair

*Application fees may apply

Curriculum & Schedule
The Required core courses are offered annually, while electives are rotated every other year. The majority of classes are 7 weeks in length with 2-3 classes scheduled per semester.

Students enrolled in the graduate certificate program will work with the Faculty Advisor/Program coordinator to develop a plan of study. Students will choose courses based upon their interest in either HR or Organizational Behavior & Training. There are no required classes. Those interested in taking part in the Capstone may do so with the permission of the Program Coordinator and Instructor.
Features of the Program
The graduate certificate program in Human Resource Management helps HRM specialists or other organizational professionals advance their knowledge and skills in the field. The program focuses on HRM practices in the private, public and nonprofit sectors. Courses offer both concept and skill components designed to help students develop practices based on solid theoretical grounding.

Specific Program Information
The Human Resource Management graduate certificate program is designed as a fully on-line program to be completed in 3 semesters (1 calendar year), based on the completion of two courses per semester. However the curriculum is flexible and allows students to complete the degree more rapidly or slowly. Students wishing to enroll in more than two courses per semester can do so with permission of the program chair. However the program must be completed within a period of six years from the time of initial enrollment.

The programs are led by faculty with advanced graduate degrees and /or possess significant experience in the fields of business, organization behavior and human resources.
Career Information
Students and alumni are engaged in a variety of organizational roles in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Many are engaged in human resource management as staff specialists or managers. Others have found the program to be helpful in their careers in general supervision and management. 
Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate, a student must have completed 18 hours of work in approved courses with an overall grade point average of 3.0 (on 4.0 scale) or higher. A complete description of all applicable graduation requirements is included in the Academic Policies section of this catalog and on the Marygrove College website.
For More Information, Contact:
G. Jerry van Rossum, MA, MBA
Assistant Professor and Chair, Professional Studies Business Division
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
313.927.1218

Courses

 HRM 505: Managerial Finance

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Focuses upon the reporting of financial operations and position, the preparation and utilization of financial data for internal applications and budget preparation, with emphasis on forecasting. Required.

HRM 655: Business Ethics

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Explores social responsibility theories on classical business ideology, including the influence of values on individual behavior and organizational corporate citizenship. Studies a conceptual framework for moral development and conceptual reasoning processes. Examines specific organizational ethics issues and the management of integrity. Required.

HRM 665: Capstone Seminar and Project

3 credits
Prerequisite: completion of 24 hours of approved course work with an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.
Integrates student learning from program course work through a team-based HRM decision-making simulation requiring strategy development and operational decision making in a business setting.  Required. 

Elective Courses

 

HRM 512: Organization Theory and Change

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Surveys theories and principles of organization and the management of change.  Focuses upon organization development—the application of behavioral science knowledge to help organizations improve productivity and the quality of work life. Stresses the role of the individual organization member, human resource practitioner, or manager as change agent.

HRM 515: Leadership and Decision Making

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Surveys leadership theories, examines interpersonal, intra- and inter-group influence processes, and assesses individual leadership and decision-making styles.

HRM 517: Communication for Managers

3 credits

Prerequisites: none
Introduces concepts and skills required for professional communication in organizational settings.  Explores strategies and techniques for effective communication through writing, individual interviews, and group interaction.

HRM 519: Human Resource Information Systems

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Examines the role of technology in support of strategic aspects of human resource management.  Also focuses on the use of information systems and decision-making applications for data collection, retrieval, and analysis within Human Resource functional areas for human resource allocation and planning.

HRM 525: Human Behavior in Organizations

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Applies behavioral and social science theories to the analysis of individual, interpersonal and group behavior in the workplace and to the development of workforce management practice. Topics include the impact on workplace behavior of individual attitude, perception, and motivation; group dynamics; and organization and work design. Special attention is given to implications of behavioral and social science knowledge for human resource management practice.

HRM 535: Human Resource Management

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Surveys the development of human resource management as a field of practice in organizations.  Explores trends and emerging issues which may shape future practice.

HRM 555: Legal Practices in Employment

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Focuses upon compliance of employment practices with laws and regulations in force.
Emphasizes implications of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) and related laws and regulations on recruitment, selection, accommodation, evaluation, and other workforce management policies and practices.

HRM 565: Employee Recruitment, Selection, and Evaluation

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Examines the design and management of personnel recruitment, selection, and evaluation procedures as means for improving individual and organizational performance. Emphasizes tools and skills for employment and performance appraisal activities.

HRM 625: Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Explores the rationale for, processes of, and environmental forces affecting union-management relations. Topics include labor law, negotiation and administration of labor agreements, and resolution of grievances.

HRM 635: Employee Development

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Surveys approaches and processes adopted by organizations to train and develop employees at all levels. Explores training design and delivery, training technology innovations, and career management.

HRM 675: Compensation and Benefits

3 credits
Prerequisites: none
Examines compensation practices and issues related to employee productivity and satisfaction. Surveys methods for determining equity of compensation and the variety of approaches for providing employee benefits. 

Humanities Course Descriptions

HUM 150 Contemporary Cultural Studies 3 hours
Prerequisite: None; (Fall, Winter, and Spring/Summer terms).
General Education option Case studies of contemporary cultural ideas, values and expressive arts in a global context.

HUM 257 Humanities of the Ancient World 3 hours
Prerequisite: None (Fall term). General Education option
Cultural ideas, values and expressive arts of major global cultures before 1500 C.E.

HUM 258 Humanities of the Modern World 3 hours
Prerequisite: None (Winter term). General Education option
Cultural ideas, values and expressive arts of major global cultures since 1500 C.E.

HUM 275 Popular Culture 3 hours
Prerequisite: None; Fee: no
Examination of ideas and values expressed in popular media, U.S.A. and global.

HUM 303 Black Film 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108
African-American film, international Black film and video, and interrelated socio-political, historical and aesthetic aspects.

HUM 315 Theater Detroit 2 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108; Fee: yes
A study of drama performed in the Detroit area. Students attend all plays being studied.

HUM 330 Arab and Islamic Humanities 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108; Fee: no
Arab and Islamic cultural values and expressive arts in historical and geographic context.

HUM 332 Latin American Humanities 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108. Fee: no
Cultural values and expressive arts of Latin American nations‚ both ancient and modern.

HUM 333A African Humanities I 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108; Fee: no (Fall term).
African cultural arts and ideas in historical and geographic context.

HUM 334 African-American Aesthetics 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108; Fee: no (Winter term).
African-American literature, philosophy, arts, and cultural values.

HUM 335 Caribbean Humanities 3 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108; Fee: no
Expressive arts and cultural values of the Caribbean, focusing on the African diaspora.

HUM 491 Independent Study 1-6 hours
Prerequisite: Equivalent of ENG 108 and permission of instructor

Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove