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Categories starting with C

Core Courses (6)

Each of the MAT degrees consists of 10 courses. Six core courses focus on content that all teachers need to know regardless of grade level and/or subject area and four specialty courses focus on the content specific to each program. Descriptions for each of the courses are listed on the following pages.
  • EDU 568 Teacher as Leader 
  • EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students 
  • EDU 570 Instructional Design 
  • EDU 618 Effective Assessment 
  • EDU 501 Teacher as Researcher 
  • EDU 5604 Evidence-Based Interventions 
Core Courses

Continuing Education (4)

At Marygrove College, our Continuing Education programs are designed to fit your schedule, your budget and your life!
Continuing Education

Continuing Education (6)

Learning new skills can make a huge difference in your career, your paycheck—or even your quality of life. Marygrove College offers high quality, short term affordable programs to provide you with the education to ensure that whatever you want to be, we can get you there.
Continuing Education

Continuing Education (4)

Certificate Programs (14)

Marygrove offers 13 areas of certification to help you gain the professional knowledge and experience you need to help you determine your own professional destiny. Why not find out more about one of the certifications that interests you?
Certificate Programs

Chemistry (4)

Are you curious? Do you like to explore problems? Do scientific questions fascinate you? Do you enjoy working in a laboratory? Do you want to better understand matter, molecules, atoms, and how they react? If so, you will be interested in a chemistry major or minor.
Chemistry

Child Development (4)

The Child Development program prepares the successful student for a career working with children from birth to age eight (8). Courses emphasize understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating young children, and the importance of family and community in developmental and educational processes.
Child Development

Child Welfare (2)

The Child Development program will prepare you to teach or work with children from birth to age eight (8). Your courses will have an emphasis on understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating that child, and the importance of family and community in the entire developmental process.
Child Welfare

Computer Graphics (1)

The Computer Graphics program is offered through the Art Department Please refer to the Art Minor programs for additional information.
Computer Graphics

Criminal Justice (4)

Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program web site. We are building an exciting new program in an emerging field and invite you to be a part of it! As a unique feature, the criminal justice major will offer cutting-edge courses in restorative justice. Restorative Justice emphasizes the ways in which crime harms relationships in the context of community. (Minnesota Dept. of Corrections) Restorative justice is a victim-centered response to crime that provides opportunities for those most directly affected by crime—the victim, the offender, their families and representatives of the community—to be directly involved in responding to the harm caused by the crime.
Criminal Justice

Items starting with C

Chemistry Course Descriptions

CHM 130 Chemical Science 4 hours
Prerequisites: ENG 107; LS 105; co-requisite: MTH 100;. Term: Fall, Winter. Fee: yes. Not for General Education.
This course is intended for those students in health science programs requiring a course in basic chemistry. Topics introduced include: math and measurement, atomic structure, chemical bonding, naming and formulas, treatment of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, and acid-base, and redox chemistry. The laboratory component complements lecture material while introducing students to a variety of experimental techniques. Laboratory included.

CHM 140 General Chemistry I 4 hours
Prerequisite: CHM 130 or satisfactory completion of chemistry placement examination. Co-requisites: MTH 105; ENG 108 Term: Winter; Fee: yes. General Education option for science majors only
Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry in a context of chemical analysis. Includes the nature of matter, periodic table, elements, ionic and covalent compounds, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, ideal gases, and acid-base chemistry. Laboratory included.

CHM 230 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 130; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course introduces basics of organic and biochemistry and meets the degree requirements for many health science fields. Organic chemistry topics include nomenclature, structure, and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups. Biochemistry topics include structure, reactivity, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The laboratory component complements and reinforces the topics covered in lecture. Laboratory included.

CHM 241 General Chemistry II 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 140; Term: Fall; Fee: yes.
Chemical thermodynamics; kinetics; equilibria; electrochemistry, redox reactions; nuclear chemistry; selected properties of the elements. Laboratory included.

CHM 325 Organic Chemistry I 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241; Term: Winter; Fee: yes.
This course begins the systematic study of the chemistry of carbon compounds—nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, predictions and trends, and introduction to synthesis. Laboratory included.

CHM 326  Organic Chemistry II 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 325; Term: Fall; Fee: yes.
Topics include functional group transformations, multistep synthesis, mechanisms, nucleophilic substitution, electrophilic substitution, and carbonyl chemistry. Laboratory included.

CHM 341 Physical Chemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150; CHM 241; MTH 251; PHY 285; Term: Winter (even) Fee: yes
Presentation of physical chemistry topics: thermodynamics, solution equilibria, chemical kinetics, transport processes, and structure with biological applications. Laboratory included.

CHM 350 Environmental Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 325; Term: Fall (even). Cross-listed with ENV 350
Introduces students to environmental chemistry, the branch of chemistry dealing with the origins, transport, reactions, effects and fates of chemical species in the water, air, soil and living environments. 

CHM 360 Biochemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 140, CHM 325, Term: Winter (even); Fee: yes. Cross-listed with BIO 360
Biochemistry 360 is an advanced-level course for students majoring in chemistry or biology. This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemi­cal properties of living systems. Topics include the structure, function and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; enzyme kinetics and regulation. The principles of bioenergetics and the integration of metabolic control will be developed. Laboratory included.

CHM 388 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, chemistry major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

CHM 390 Laboratory Analysis 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241; Term Winter. Fee: yes. Offered alternate years
Theory and practical application of instruments as applied to physiochemical and analytical methods. Laboratory included.

CHM 401 Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 325; Term: Fall (odd)
Study of the chemistry of the metals and non-metals emphasizing periodic behavior, atomic and molecular structure, ionic and covalent bonding, coordination compounds, oxidation and reduction reactions, acid-base chemistry, organometallic compounds, transition metal complexes and reaction kinetics.

CHM 410 Special Topics in Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 325; Junior Status in major. Term: TBA.
Advanced study of modern synthetic reactions, including mechanisms and theoretical perspectives. Includes use of modern spectroscopic methods.

CHM 488 Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, chemistry major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, SummerSupervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

CHM 491  Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; chemistry major or minor; junior status; Term: TBA
Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 312 Junior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter
Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS.  Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work.  In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports.  The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one.  A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity.  This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 496A Science Senior Seminar: Library Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major. Term: Fall, Winter
This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project.  Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B.  Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B Science Senior Seminar: Laboratory Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member.  The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

Child Development Course Descriptions

BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle 3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 099, BIO 139 strongly recommended; Term 2
Study of the factors affecting the health and nutrition needs of young children. Students will apply the basic principles of nutrition, food handling, and meal planning to meet the nutritional needs of children in care and education programs.

CD 213 Infant/Toddler: Care/Education 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241,  CD 240 or equivalent experience Term 2
Study and review of knowledge related to the growth and development of infants to three years old. Students will study the current research and resources to learn about optimal methods of care and education for children in this age group. Course requirements include observation in an infant/toddler program.

CD/ECE 223 Professional Partnerships in Early Childhood Education: Child, Family, School, and Community 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD/PSY 240, or equivalent experience; Term 2
Study and exploration of theory and research on the impact of the multiple influences of children’s environments including the influence of culture, language, economic factors, health status, learning needs, family, technology, media, and community. Students will use their knowledge of children’s physical and psychological health to learn what constitutes child abuse and neglect and about their legal responsibilities to report suspected abuse. Students will explore their role as advocates for children, families, and the early childhood profession. Students will have opportunities to observe and interact with multiple stakeholders during field experiences.

CD 240 Developmental Psychology 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205 Term 1, 2
An overview of human development and factors that influence development. Course covers physical‚ intellectual‚ social and emotional development from infancy through adolescence.

CD/ECE 241 Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Education 3hours
Term 1 – This is the foundational/first course in the Child Development major
Introduction to a foundational understanding of children’s development and learning processes. Knowledge gained provides a basis for creating and promoting learning environments that affirm the diversity of children, their families, and community contexts. Students will learn about the appropriate use and interpretation of data derived from a variety of assessment tools, and ways to use assessment data in positive partnerships with families and other professionals. In order to foster children’s social competence, students will learn ways to build community within care and learning environments Students will use as their primary resources state and national guidelines and standards that represent what is known to represent best practices for diverse learners in care and educational settings for young children. Students will apply developmentally appropriate approaches to teaching and learning during field experiences.

CD 326 Administration of Developmental Centers 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 213, CD/PSY 240, CD 241, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375, BIO 141; Term 2
Study of the requirements for establishing and operating child care centers. Course work focuses on understanding and applying State of Michigan licensing rules. Course requirements include a field experience in a child care center.

CD/ECE 333 Math/Science Methods for Early Childhood 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205,CD 213, CD 223, CD/PSY 240, CD 241, CD 350; Term 1Study of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in the content areas of math and science. Students will use their knowledge to create challenging learning environments using curricular interactions and learning materials designed to promote children’s cognitive development, positive social skills, and self-motivation. Students will create learning environments that include spontaneous activity and guided investigations appropriate to the needs of diverse learners. Students will learn to use a systematic approach to assessment to inform planning, implementing, and evaluating math and science curriculum. Students will create, implement, and assess math and science activities and curriculum during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse learners.

CD/ECE 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 213, CD/PSY 240, CD 241; Term 2
Study of the theories of play and aesthetic development. Students will build an understanding of the characteristics and development of young children in play and aesthetic domains (including art, music, and drama), and will use their knowledge to create challenging and supportive environments and curriculum for diverse learners. Students will use (and adapt) appropriate assessment measures to guide them in evaluating children’s development. Students will model and teach positive social skills during play interactions to facilitate children’s development of self-control, selfmotivation, and self-esteem. Students will create, implement, and assess play and aesthetic activities and curriculum during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse learners.

CD/ECE 375 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Education 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 241, CD 213, CD 223 CD/PSY 240, CD 350; Term 1
Study of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in the content areas of language and literacy development. Students consider the impact of children’s cultural, linguistic, and economic contexts on their language and literacy learning. Students will learn ways to create supportive and challenging language and literacy learning environments (using curriculum interactions, teaching practices, and learning materials) to meet the needs and interests of diverse learners. Students will learn to appropriately and effectively use assessment methods to design, implement, and evaluate children’s experiences in language and literacy learning environments and will have opportunities to apply this knowledge in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse and exceptional learners.

CD/ECE 398 Assessment of Young Children 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 213, CD 223, CD/PSY 240, CD 241, CD 326, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375, CD 398, CD 399, CD 420 Senior status in child development program; or permission of the instructor; ENG 312; Term 2
This course will focus on standardized assessment measures and authentic observational techniques for evaluating the development and learning of young children birth through eight years of age. Selected topics will include: formal standardized and informal authentic assessment measures, current issues and strategies surrounding the assessment of young children, including children with special needs and diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and the link between assessment and instruction. Evaluation of early childhood programs will also be addressed.

CD 399 Child Development Practicum 6 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 213, CD 223, CD/PSY 240, CD 241, CD 326, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375, CD 398, CD 399, CD 420 Senior status in child development program; or permission of the instructor; ENG 312; Term 2
Course requires participation in on-going structured and supervised field experiences in an infant/toddler or preschool program under the direction of a qualified cooperating teacher. The practicum experience will provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned, become a member of a collaborative community, and deepen their understanding of their role as members of the early childhood profession. During the practicum experience, students will have opportunities including, but not limited to: creating and implementing curriculum, creating and implementing student assessment, analyzing and applying assessment data, partnering and communicating with families, and demonstrating the ability to partner and guide the work of other adults in the educational setting. Seminar required.

CD/ECE 420 The Exceptional Child in Early Childhood Education 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 375 or permission of the instructor; Term 2
Study of children’s typical and atypical developmental characteristics and needs in learning domains including physical, cognitive, social, emotional, language, and aesthetic development. Students will gain specific knowledge about developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, health problems, and learning and behavior disorders. Students will understand the teacher’s role in initiating and developing Individualized Education Programs (IEP) and Individualized Family Services Plans (IFSP), and will explore the responsibilities of all stakeholders in the process of developing and implementing educational plans to meet the needs of diverse learners. Students will explore the use of assessments for specific disabilities and the use of adaptive and assistive devices. Students will have opportunities to apply this knowledge during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse and exceptional learners.

CD 496 Senior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 213, CD 223, CD/PSY 240, CD 241, CD 326, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375, CD 398, CD 399, CD 420 Senior status in child development program; or permission of the instructor; ENG 312; Term 1
Study and exploration of the major types of research design. Students will use comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in child development to support their selection of a research topic related to early childhood care and education. Students will identify articles from a selection of scholarly journals related to their chosen topics. Students will write a literature review based on identified key ideas in the literature. Students create a plan of action based on their research. Students will design, implement, and evaluate their plan and report their findings in a Case Study format. Students will report their findings in an in-class presentation. Students will begin to develop a specific area of expertise and experience the link between research and practice. This course provides a foundation for students who elect to continue their studies in Child Development at the Graduate level.

ECE 499 Student Teaching: Preschool 6 hours
Prerequisites: CD/ECE 223, CD/ECE 333, CD/ECE 241, CD/ECE 350, CD/ECE 375, CD/ECE 398, CD/ECE 420 or permission of instructor; Term 2
Students will participate in on-going structured and supervised field experiences in at least two of the three early childhood periods (i.e., infant/toddler, preschool, and early elementary through grade 3) under the direction of a qualified cooperating teacher. Students will have opportunities to demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on their work and make informed decisions. During the student teaching experience students will have opportunities, including but not limited, to: creating and implementing curriculum, creating and implementing student assessment, analyzing and applying assessment data, partnering and communicating with families, and demonstrating the ability to partner and guide the work of other adults in the educational setting. Senior status. Seminar required.

EDU 205 Children’s Literature 3 hours
Prerequisites: CD/PSY 240, CD 241, ENG 108; Term 1, 2,  ENG 108
Interpretive and critical study of literature for children and adolescents is provided. An historical and categorical survey of children’s books, stressing significance in classrooms and the home, is outlined.

Certificate in Gerontology

 

The total credit hour requirement for the certificate is 16 hours, including:

A. Required Courses

SW 200 A            Special Topics: Substance Abuse                          2 hours
SW 237/537        Physical Aspects of Aging                                       2 hours
*SW 299              Pre-professional Practicum                                     3 hours
SW 378/578        Policies and Services for Older Persons                 2 hours
SW 410/610        Working with Older Adults                                        2 hours
PSY 346/546       Aging Individual in Society                                        3 hours

*To be arranged with approval of the director of the gerontology program.

B. Elective Courses

Select a minimum of two credit hours from the following courses:

BIO 141                 Nutrition Through the Life Cycle                            3 hours
EDU 390/590         The Adult Learner                                                  3 hours
PSY 348                 Death and Dying                                                    3 hours
RS 384                   Faith and Human Development                             3 hours
SOC 306                Ethnic and Racial Diversity                                    3 hours
SW 325                  Professional Communication                                 4 hours
SW 200 C               Working with Mental Illness                                   2 hours

 

Certificate Program and Endorsement in Specific Learning Disabilities

POSSIBLE CAREERS:
Special Education Teacher
General Education Teacher
Teacher Consultant
Special Education Advocate

 

FOR INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Steffanie N. Bowles, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Coordinator Special Education
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
313-927-1482

 

FEATURES OF THE PROGRAM
Marygrove’s Certificate Program and Endorsement in Specific Learning Disabilities is designed for certified teachers who wish to add the LD endorsement. This program combines face-to-face courses on our Detroit campus with hybrid and online course offerings. Student teaching requirements may be satisfied in on-the-job placements or during the summer semester to meet the needs of candidates who work full time during the school year.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • Michigan Teaching Certificate (Elementary or Secondary). Teachers from other states will be accepted into the program, but will need to confirm reciprocity within their state/district.
  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum 3.0 grade point average
  • Completed application
  • Official Transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed
  • Career plan
  • Two letters of recommendation

 

SPECIFIC PROGRAM INFORMATION
Students in the Special Education program are prepared to utilize a variety of instructional approaches as well as demonstrate what they have learned in a number of ways. By experiencing a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies firsthand, candidates are prepared to model similar techniques in their own classrooms. Special education methods courses have strong practicum components involving candidates with students in K-12 classrooms throughout their educational program. This program is 38 credit hours.

Certificate Program and Endorsement in Specific Learning Disabilities
All students accepted to Special Education Certificate Programs will undergo a transcript review and development of a Plan of Work outlining required coursework. Courses may be transferred into the program with documentation of equivalency. The endorsement, granted by the State of Michigan, requires a passing score on the subject area test of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC).

FOUNDATION PRE-REQUIREMENTS
Note: Pre-Requirement courses are only needed if you did not take them during your initial teacher certification
EDU 551 (3) Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment
SED 552 (3) Assessment & Differentiation
EDU 553 (3) Designing & Creating Effective Learning Environments for Diverse Learners

CORE REQUIREMENTS
SED 565 (3) Teaching Students With Disabilities
SED 570 (3) Students With Disabilities: School, Family, and Community Interaction
SED 573 (3) Assistive Technology in Special Education
SED 575 (3) IEP Development

LEARNING DISABILITY CONCENTRATION COURSES
SED 556 (3) Language Development and Disorders
SED 564 (3) Characteristics of Students with Learning Disabilities
SED 555 (3) Pre-Professional Practicum in Learning Disabilities
SED 625 (3) Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities
SED 650 (3) Teaching Mathematics to Students With Disabilities
SED 567 (3) Teaching Writing to Students With Disabilities
SED 601, 602, 603 (1 credit each) Seminar in Learning Disabilities

EXIT REQUIREMENTS
SED 699 (5) Student Teaching in Learning Disabilities

Certificate Program and Endorsement in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Certificate Program and Endorsement in Autism Spectrum Disorders

POSSIBLE CAREERS:
Special Education Teacher
General Education Teacher
Teacher Consultant
Special Education Advocate

 

FOR INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Steffanie N. Bowles, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Coordinator Special Education
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
313-927-1482

 

FEATURES OF THE PROGRAM
Marygrove’s Certificate Program and Endorsement in Autism Spectrum Disorders is designed are designed for certified teachers who wish to add the ASD endorsement. This program is available completely online. Student teaching requirements may be satisfied in on-the-job placements or during the summer semester to meet the needs of candidates who work full time during the school year.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • Michigan Teaching Certificate (Elementary or Secondary). Teachers from other states will be accepted into the program, but will need to confirm reciprocity within their state/district.
  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum 3.0 grade point average
  • Completed application
  • Official Transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed
  • Career plan
  • Two letters of recommendation

 

SPECIFIC PROGRAM INFORMATION
Students in the Special Education program are prepared to utilize a variety of instructional approaches as well as demonstrate what they have learned in a number of ways. By experiencing a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies firsthand, candidates are prepared to model similar techniques in their own classrooms. Special education methods courses have strong practicum components involving candidates with students in K-12 classrooms throughout their educational program. This program is 32 credit hours.

Certificate Program and Endorsement in Autism Spectrum Disorders
All students accepted to Special Education Certificate Programs will undergo a transcript review and development of a Plan of Work outlining required coursework. Courses may be transferred into the program with documentation of equivalency. The endorsement, granted by the State of Michigan, requires a passing score on the subject area test of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC).

SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE COURSES
SED 565 (3) Teaching Students With Disabilities
SED 570 (3) Students With Disabilities: School, Family, and Community Interaction
SED 573 (3) Assistive Technology in Special Education
SED 575 (3) IEP Development

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER CONCENTRATION COURSES
SED 651 (3) Characteristics of Students with Autism
SED 655 (3) Pre-professional Practicum in Autism Spectrum Disorder
SED 661 (3) Using Applied Behavior Analysis in the Classroom Setting
SED 664 (3) Language and Communication in Autism Spectrum Disorder
SED 601, 602,603 (1 credit each) Seminar in Autism Spectrum Disorder

EXIT REQUIREMENTS
SED 699 (5) Student Teaching in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Career Information

The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

Certificate in Child Welfare

For specific requirements and courses‚ please refer to section entitled Child Welfare in this catalog.

Certification for Post-Degree Students

Post-degree students can obtain Michigan provisional teacher certification by following the requirements of the undergraduate teacher certification program described above. A plan of work for teaching disciplines is facilitated by the Teacher Certification Officer through the Liberal Arts & Sciences faculty.

Post-degree students can obtain Michigan provisional teacher certification by following the requirements of the undergraduate teacher certification program described above. A plan of work for teaching disciplines is facilitated by the Teacher Certification Officer through the Liberal Arts & Sciences faculty.

Certificate in Gerontology

For specific requirements and courses‚ please refer to section entitled Gerontology in this catalog.

Certificate Program in Computer Graphics

The 18-credit hour computer graphics certificate program is designed for post-degree art majors who are interested in a general introduction to the field and more in-depth experiences in computer-assisted image production.

Using the Macintosh environment, these students study paint/draw processes, electronic page layout and scanning techniques. Emphasis is given to skill-building and developing a digital aesthetic.

CIA 601 Instructional Strategies For Successful Learning

Instructional Strategies for Successful Student Learning supports development of skillful teacher leaders by focusing on research-based teaching strategies that result in improved student achievement. Participants explore the results and classroom implications of brain-based learning, cooperative learning structures, and nine research-based instructional strategies by analyzing the instructional practices in real classrooms and customize the use of the strategies to their own teaching situations.

CIA 605 Student-Directed Learning to Foster Motivation and Engagement

Student-Directed Learning to Foster Motivation and Engagement digs deeper into concepts and theories introduced in prior courses. Now that the participants have common understanding of backward design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2006), effective assessment and how to meet the needs of all students, they are ready to hone in on ways to motivate their students to be more self-directed in their learning. 

This course focuses on helping students develop the skills necessary to thrive in and out of the classroom. Participants learn strategies for helping their students develop flexible knowledge, as well as problem-solving, cooperative learning and self-motivation skills. Special attention is given to ways to engage all students in opportunities to examine and evaluate their own work and learn from the work of their peers.

Student-Directed Learning to Foster Motivation and Engagement digs deeper into concepts and theories introduced in prior courses. Now that the participants have common understanding of backward design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2006), effective assessment and how to meet the needs of all students, they are ready to hone in on ways to motivate their students to be more self-directed in their learning. 

This course focuses on helping students develop the skills necessary to thrive in and out of the classroom. Participants learn strategies for helping their students develop flexible knowledge, as well as problem-solving, cooperative learning and self-motivation skills. Special attention is given to ways to engage all students in opportunities to examine and evaluate their own work and learn from the work of their peers. 

COURSE OUTCOMES 

Participants will be able to: 

• Examine the latest research on student motivation and the classroom implications of this research 

• Implement instructional strategies that enable students to be more self-directed 

• Plan and incorporate consistent peer tutoring 

• Develop tools to involve students in evaluating their work

CIA 615 Teacher as Everyday Hero

The final course of the program, Teacher as Everyday Hero, is a culmination of many strands covered throughout the degree. This course strikes a balance between the macro-and micro-concepts of teaching. Participants will have the opportunity to demonstrate how they are no longer just surviving as teachers but thriving as teacher leaders. Throughout Teacher as Everyday Hero, participants examine case studies of truly inspirational teachers who have transformed the lives of their students. Through the use of biographies, narratives, profiles and interviews with top educators and scholars, participants explore and reflect on the problems and satisfactions of teaching, which culminates in the writing of their personal teacher story.

The final course of the program, Teacher as Everyday Hero, is a culmination of many strands covered throughout the degree. This course strikes a balance between the macro-and micro-concepts of teaching. Participants will have the opportunity to demonstrate how they are no longer just surviving as teachers but thriving as teacher leaders. ThroughoutTeacher as Everyday Hero, participants examine case studies of truly inspirational teachers who have transformed the lives of their students. Through the use of biographies, narratives, profiles and interviews with top educators and scholars, participants explore and reflect on the problems and satisfactions of teaching, which culminates in the writing of their personal teacher story. 

COURSE OUTCOMES 

Participants will be able to: 

• Examine the tangible effects inspirational teachers have had on students 

• Compare and contrast the characteristics of inspirational teachers 

• Complete a self-evaluation of experience in the program and personal growth as a teacher leader 

• Create a personal teacher story as part of their ongoing professional and personal development 

CERTIFICATE IN CHILD WELFARE

The total credit hour requirement for the certificate is 17 hours, including:

A. Required Courses
PSY 205 Introductory to Psychology   4 hours
BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle   3 hours
               -OR-
BIO 201 Ecology and the Environment 4 hours
SW 200A Special Topics: Substance Abuse   2 hours
SW 200B Special Topics: Working with Children and Families   2 hours
CD/SW 268 Child Welfare Policies and Services   2 hours
*SW 299 Pre-professional Practicum   3-4 hours

*To be arranged with approval of the director of the child welfare certificate program.

B. Elective Courses
CD 213 Infant/Toddler: Care/Education   3 hours
CD 223 Young Child Guidance and Parent Advocacy   3 hours
CD 326 Administration of Developmental Centers   3 hours
PSY 240 Developmental Psychology   3 hours
CD 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics 3 hours
CD 420 The Exceptional Child in Early Childhood Education 3 hours
SOC 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity   3 hours
SOC 311 Deviant Behavior   3 hours
SOC 345 Sociology of the Family   3 hours
SW 200C Special Topics: Working with Mental Illness   2 hours

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Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove