a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z #

Categories starting with C

Core Courses (6)

Core Courses
Each of the MAT degrees consists of 10 courses. Six core courses focus on content that all teachers need to know regardless of grade level and/or subject area and four specialty courses focus on the content specific to each program. Descriptions for each of the courses are listed on the following pages.
  • EDU 568 Teacher as Leader 
  • EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students 
  • EDU 570 Instructional Design 
  • EDU 618 Effective Assessment 
  • EDU 501 Teacher as Researcher 
  • EDU 5604 Evidence-Based Interventions 

Continuing Education (4)

Continuing Education
At Marygrove College, our Continuing Education programs are designed to fit your schedule, your budget and your life!

Continuing Education (7)

Continuing Education
Learning new skills can make a huge difference in your career, your paycheck—or even your quality of life. Marygrove College offers high quality, short term affordable programs to provide you with the education to ensure that whatever you want to be, we can get you there.

Continuing Education (4), Online Learning (1)

Certificate Programs (14)

Certificate Programs
Marygrove offers 13 areas of certification to help you gain the professional knowledge and experience you need to help you determine your own professional destiny. Why not find out more about one of the certifications that interests you?

Chemistry (4)

Chemistry
Are you curious? Do you like to explore problems? Do scientific questions fascinate you? Do you enjoy working in a laboratory? Do you want to better understand matter, molecules, atoms, and how they react? If so, you will be interested in a chemistry major or minor.

Child Development (4)

Child Development
The Child Development program prepares the successful student for a career working with children from birth to age eight (8). Courses emphasize understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating young children, and the importance of family and community in developmental and educational processes.

Child Welfare (3)

Child Welfare
The Child Development program will prepare you to teach or work with children from birth to age eight (8). Your courses will have an emphasis on understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating that child, and the importance of family and community in the entire developmental process.

Computer Graphics (2)

Computer Graphics
The Computer Graphics program is offered through the Art Department Please refer to the Art Minor programs for additional information.

Criminal Justice (4)

Criminal Justice
Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program web site. We are building an exciting new program in an emerging field and invite you to be a part of it! As a unique feature, the criminal justice major will offer cutting-edge courses in restorative justice. Restorative Justice emphasizes the ways in which crime harms relationships in the context of community. (Minnesota Dept. of Corrections) Restorative justice is a victim-centered response to crime that provides opportunities for those most directly affected by crime—the victim, the offender, their families and representatives of the community—to be directly involved in responding to the harm caused by the crime.

Items starting with C

Course Descriptions

 

EDU 203

The Teaching Profession

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  None

This course is designed as an in-depth introduction to multiple considerations of the career of teaching.  This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the important aspects of teaching, and allows students to observe the teaching profession in action.  Course requires 25 service hours in a classroom setting.

EDU 240

Developmental Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  None.  Elementary Level Exploratory Student

Human development and factors that influence it with particular emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

EDU 241

Educational Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This is an introductory course in the psychology of learning and teaching (Grades K-12), emphasizing mental abilities, individual differences, motivation and application of psychological theory and research in learning.  The course emphasizes constructivist theories of learning and cognition, examining the effects of culture and gender on learning, and studies the classroom as a social setting.

EDU 275

Foundations in American Education

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: None

In this course, students examine the structure, function, and purposes of American education. These topics include philosophical, social, historical, political, and economic contexts of educational systems, and the role and characteristics of the teaching profession.

EDU 330

Technology in the Classroom

3 credit  hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This course explores the use of multimedia teaching tools. Students develop plans of action integrating technology in support of instruction and learning. They explore, evaluate, and use technology to accomplish learning tasks independently and cooperatively. Course includes appropriate field based experiences.

EDU 343

Adolescent Psychology

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 205. Secondary Level Exploratory Student

Physical, psychological and social factors in personality development from the preadolescent through the late-adolescent period. Problems of adjustment, achievement of identity, and acceptance of the adult role.

EDU 344

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course addresses approaches for teaching mathematics to grades K-8. Emphasis is on developing Math concepts through discovery, problem solving, observing patterns and relationships, and meeting the individual needs of children of various abilities and experience levels. Field based experiences required.

 

EDU 347

General Secondary Methods

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 343, EDU 348, EDU 351 and program acceptance as a Secondary Candidate

This course focuses on techniques for developing lesson plans, unit plans and course overviews which incorporate objectives, evaluation and a variety of teaching-learning strategies. Field based experiences and simulations in lesson presentation and classroom management required.

EDU 348/ ENG 348

Teaching Writing and Speaking in the Elementary and Secondary Classroom

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: none

This course presents an introduction to the theories and practices of teaching written and oral literacy at the elementary and secondary levels.

EDU 351

Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment                       

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 275 and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Pre-Candidate

This course offers approaches to curriculum, instruction and assessment designed to engage students in an integrated process of teaching and learning.  Students design units and create supporting lesson plans based on Grade Level Content Standards that focus on using differentiated instructional strategies, assessment practices, and technology integration.  Students practice collaboration skills, applying peer review processes aimed at improving unit design and lesson plans.

EDU 352

Assessment and Differentiation

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 275  program acceptance as an Elementary Pre-Candidate

This course builds upon content introduced in EDU 351 to prepare candidates to assess the effects of instruction on student performance. Emphasis is placed on theories and concepts related to differentiation of instruction and assessment in order to meet the needs of a wide range of learners, including those in special education and speakers of English as a second language.

 

EDU 353

Designing and Managing Effective Learning Environments for Diverse Learners

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240 or EDU 343, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 348, EDU 351, EDU 352 [Elem only], and program acceptance as an Elementary or Secondary Candidate

This course addresses the design and management of curriculum, instruction and classrooms to provide meaningful learning for diverse groups of students. The educational implications of the characteristics of students with exceptionalities are explored. Research in practices of effective teaching is examined, with specific emphasis on teacher and student behaviors related to aspects of diversity in urban settings. Techniques for developing effective communication with parents and community are explored.  Field-based experiences required.

 

EDU 354

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course offers a combination of theoretical and practical models, providing multicultural approaches to activities, materials, and resources necessary for teaching social studies grades K-8. Field based experiences required.

EDU 357

Methods for Teaching Intermediate and Secondary Reading

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 343, EDU 348, EDU 351 and program acceptance as a Secondary Candidate

This course addresses adapting content instruction to meet the needs of middle school and secondary school students with reading problems. The course presents analysis of variations in vocabulary, format, comprehension, and study procedures in various content areas, and develops teaching strategies for improving basic reading skills and proficiency.  Field based experiences required.

EDU 364A

Methods for Elementary Reading and Other Language Arts

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course addresses the reading, writing, listening, and speaking processes in literacy development. Students exam­ine teaching strategies and materials that support integrated language arts instruction. Strategies for organization and management of classroom reading programs in grades K-8 are developed. Related software applications are explored. Guided observation and field-based experience required.

EDU 364B

Methods for Elementary Reading: Practicum Strategies   

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course presents strategies for developing and implementing detailed lesson plans based on a diagnostic-instruction model for both developmental skills in reading and reading in the content areas. First half of the course prepares the student for field-based experience. Peer, instructor, and self-evaluation of lessons.

EDU 374

Methods for Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science

3 credit hours

Prerequisites: EDU 203, EDU 240, EDU 241, EDU 275, EDU 330, EDU 351, EDU 352, and program acceptance as an Elementary Candidate

This course presents methodology appropriate for teaching scientific concepts. Teaching demonstrations, projects, daily and unit planning are approaches addressed in this course. Students participate in one field trip. The course makes extensive use of media in Marygrove’s Library Resources Room.  Emphasis is placed on the inquiry-based strategies, problem-solving activities, hands-on activities, the interdisciplinary nature of science, children's understandings, objectives of school science programs, science education reform, methods of instruction, assessment practices, experimental programs, and content in the physical, life, and earth sciences. Emphasis is on con­tent and methods for grades K-8.  Field based experience required.

EDU 491

Independent Study

3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  Permission of Advisor and Instructor

When necessary and with approval of advisor, students are permitted to request an independent study.

EDU 499 Student Teaching  and Seminar

10-12 credit hours

Prerequisites: Completion of all required teacher certification coursework, Admission to Student Teaching

This capstone course includes observation and guided‚ full-time professional laboratory experience in public or private school classrooms at the appropriate level.  Seminar required.  Fall and Spring term only.

 

Course Descriptions

EDU 351: Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment 3 credits

This course offers approaches to curriculum, instruction and assessment designed to engage students in an integrated process of teaching and learning. Students design units and create supporting lesson plans using the backward design framework geared towards meeting content area standards. Students use internet resources, practice collaboration skills and apply peer review processes aimed at improving unit design and lesson plans. 

EDU 352: Assessment & Differentiation 3 credits

This course builds upon content introduced in EDU 351 to prepare candidates to assess the effects of instruction on student performance. Emphasis is placed on theories and concepts of assessment relating them to the backward design framework in order to meet the needs of a wide range of learners. Differentiation is applied in terms of assessment of individual, small group and whole group instruction and learning.

EDU 353: Designing & Managing Effective Learning Environments for Diverse Learners 3 credits

This course addresses the design and management of the classroom environment to provide meaningful learning for diverse groups of students. The educational implications of the characteristics of diverse learners are explored. Research in practices of effective teaching is examined, with specific emphasis on teacher and student behaviors. Techniques for developing effective communication with parents and community are practiced. Field-based experiences required. 

SED 555: Pre-Professional Practicum in Learning Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

The Pre-professional Practicum in Learning Disabilities requires thirty-five hours of supervised observation and participation with students identified learning disabled in a school or community setting. The course features seminar discussion of classroom observation, theories of learning disabilities, ethical issues, and development of a personal theoretical framework. 

SED 556: Language Development and Disorders 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

Relationship of language development and psycholinguistics to the child’s motor, emotional, and cognitive development is covered, with special reference to the educational process and difficulties of students with learning disabilities. Focus on teaching strategies and multi-media approaches.

SED 564: Characteristics of Students With Learning Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

SED 564 focuses on the etiology, guidelines, and legal definition of learning disabilities, as well as how learning disabilities affect individuals across the life span. Multiple theories of disability, including the social construction of disability, multicultural influences on diagnosis, and the role of social organization and structure are discussed.

SED 565: Teaching Students With Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisite: SED 564

SED 565 focuses on the appropriate methods and techniques for meeting the educational needs of students with mild disabilities. Psychological information about groups and individuals; strategies for achieving integration in regular education; organizational structures of schools, and strategies for teaching reading, math, and study skills are covered in this course. 

SED 567: Teaching Writing to Students With Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

SED 567 provides an overview of the literature on the psychology of written language for individuals with learning disabilities from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Information and specific strategies for identifying oral and written language difficulties in students with disabilities are provided. Emphasis is on theory and educational applications—designing and implementing instruction for students with disabilities.

SED 570: Students With Disabilities: School, Family, and Community Interaction 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

In this course candidates develop flexible theoretical frameworks, practical skills and sensitivity in working with families of students with disabilities. The theoretical basis for current approaches to supporting families, the anomalies and challenges presented by the growing diversity of U.S. society, and development of a critical awareness of formal and informal supports for families is investigated.

SED 573: Assistive Technology in Special Education 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

SED 573 introduces the use of adaptive technology, methods for linking technology and instruction of students with special needs, techniques for selecting and utilizing computer based instructional programs, and methods for developing interactive instructional materials.

SED 575: IEP Development 3 credits

Prerequisites: none

SED 575 covers pre-referral and referral processes for students, assessment plans, eligibility criteria for services, due process, and development of the individual education plan (IEP). The course includes consideration of students’ assistive technology needs, transitions, modifications, functional behavior analyses and intervention plans.

SED 601, 602, & 603: Seminar in Learning Disabilities 1 credit each of three semesters

Prerequisites: none

This series of one-credit seminar courses require a minimum of three semesters in the Special Education Master’s Degree Program. Monthly meetings on campus engage candidates in work around current issues and trends in Special Education. These on campus meetings are supplemented by regular meetings with mentor teachers who model and collaborate with candidates in field-based settings.

SED 625: Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisite: SED 565

SED 625 offers a wide range of research based, multisensory, technology-enhanced strategies and techniques for teaching reading, spelling, and written expression skills in an integrated process. 

SED 650: Teaching Mathematics to Students With Disabilities 3 credits

Prerequisite: SED 565

SED 650 introduces approaches to teaching and assessing mathematics for special needs students. Candidates learn to examine, evaluate, and apply teaching approaches used in both general and special education settings. 

SED 699: Student Teaching in Learning Disabilities 4 credits

Prerequisites: none

SED 699 includes observation and guided full-time, 8-12 week professional laboratory experience in a classroom or community setting with students identified as learning disabled.  

EDU 602: Introduction to Educational Research 3 credits

Identical to EDL 602. Credit may not be earned in more than one of these courses.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the principles and procedures for studying and conducting educational research. The course introduces basic vocabulary, concepts, and methods of educational research. Students learn to analyze educational research, plan and conduct their own research studies, and report research findings accurately, with emphasis on application of research principles.

Certificate Program in Computer Graphics

This Post-degree Certificate Program in Computer Graphics offers a concentrated experience in com­puter graphics for the post-degree art major. The major emphasis is placed on computer-based graphic design and imaging, but you can also elect a more experimental approach to the medium.

The 18-credit hour computer graphics certificate program is designed for post-degree art majors who are interested in a general introduction to the field and more in-depth experiences in computer-assisted image production.

Using the Macintosh environment, these students study digital imagining including working with all of the Creative Suite programs. . Emphasis is given to skill-build­ing and developing a digital aesthetic.

Criminal Justice Course Descriptions

CJ  110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 hours
Term: 1 and/or 2

Overview of the various components of the justice system. This course investigates social order and the notion of justice as examined in its respective relationships to various forms of social institutions.  It provides an examina­tion of the roles, objectives, and methods of institutions such as the police, the courts, corrections, and the com­munity and their relationships within the larger framework of public policy.

CJ 200 Sociological Perspectives of Crime 3 hours 
Term 1or 2, Prerequisites:  CJ 110

This course seeks to provide a sociological understanding in the study of crime. The nature, cause, control, treat­ment and prevention of crime will be examined through a sociological lens.  An emphasis on developing critical thinking skills when evaluating theory, policy, and research will be undertaken.

CJ 240 Corrections 3 hours
Term: 1 offered as needed.

Organizational and operational methods in correctional facilities (objectives, security levels, pre-release). Human concerns in custodial care. Includes co-ed and women’s facilities.

CJ 311 Deviant Behavior 3 hours
Prerequisite: SOC 201; Term: 1

Emphasizes interplay between society and the person in the development of deviant behavior. Explores the differ­ent kinds of deviance, theory, social control, and social issues.

CJ 320 Juvenile Delinquency 3 hours
Course cross-listed with SOC320.  Term 1 or 2, Prerequisite: SOC 201; Term: 2

Provides an overview of juvenile behavior and the juvenile justice system in American society. A critical approach is used exploring the history and social construction of juvenile delinquency as a social phenomenon, theoretical explanations for delinquent behavior, experiences of juvenile delinquents, and the organizational processes and politics of the contemporary juvenile justice system.

CJ 330 Criminal Behavior 3 hours
Term: 2  Prerequisite:  CJ110 

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of crime and criminality.  The nature and extent of crime along with various explanations of crime and criminality will be examined.

CJ 351 Restorative Justice  3 hours
Course cross-listed with SOC351, Prerequisite:  CJ110, CJ200, Instructor permission.

This course is an overview of community and restorative justice. It is an introductory analysis of the principles and practices of restorative justice.  Restorative justice offers an approach to criminal justice based on a balanced focus on the victim, offender, and community.

CJ 352 Women in the American Criminal Justice System 3 hours
Course cross-listed with  SOC 352, Prerequisite: CJ110; Term: 1 Alternate Years  

Focuses on women as offenders, victims and professionals in the criminal justice system with particular emphasis on ethnicity as an influencing factor.

CJ 355Social Research Methods 4 hours
Course cross-listed with SW 355, Prerequisite: MTH 100, PSY205; SOC201; Term 1, 2   Instructor Permission

Provides a beginning understanding and appreciation of social research. Emphasizes the use and production of research for improving one’s effectiveness as a generalist social work practitioner or social science professional. Students become familiar with different social research approaches (using both quantitative and qualitative data), and learn a method for effectively evaluating research studies. Includes a series of experiential exercises that lead students step-by-step through the research process: deciding and developing a research question, specify­ing sampling strategy, selecting or developing appropriate measures, planning and carrying out a data collection, analyzing data, writing a research paper, etc. Emphasizes important ethical and human diversity issues raised throughout the research process.

CJ 356 Police and Society 3 hours
Offered as needed.  Term 1.  Prerequisite:  CJ110

The relationship between police and society in the United States will be examined. This course offers students an overview of who the police are and what they do.  It will look at problems related to policing, and the many reforms and innovations that have been attempted in police work.

CJ 358 Law and Society 3 hours
Course cross-listed with POL 358. Prerequisite: Introductory course in Political Science or Social Science;

Term: Alternate years A study of American law as seen through the United States Constitution and interpreted by the federal and state court systems. Also a brief examination of the roots of American civil and criminal law.

CJ 380 Criminal Law  3 hours
Term: 1 Prerequisite: CJ110

Processes of U.S. and state court systems. Studies constitutional law regarding due process, search and seizure. Includes selected precedent-setting cases. Examines American Correctional Association standards.

CJ 400 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 3 hours
Prerequisites:   CJ110, junior or senior standing, permission of instructor; Offered as needed.

Selected topics and issues in criminal justice as chosen by the instructor.

CJ 491 Independent Study in Criminal Justice 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: CJ110, permission of instructor ; Term: 1, 2, 3

Advanced research in criminology and/or crimi­nal justice and presentation of critically evaluated data.

CJ 493 Readings in Criminal Justice 3 hours
Prerequisites: For CJ majors. CJ110, junior or senior standing, permission of the instructor; Term: 1, 2, 3

In-depth investigation of a selected area of Criminology and Criminal Justice. May be repeated for credit(s).

CJ 495 Restorative Justice Practices 3 hours
Prerequisites: CJ 351

This course is a continuation of CJ351 Restorative Justice. This seminar will take a critical look at traditional government responses to crime in the United States and examine how the principles and practice of restorative justice may improve that response. The application of the principles of restorative justice and the challenges of a restorative approach will be addressed

CJ 496 Senior Seminar Project 3 hours
Course cross-listed with SOC 496. Prerequisites: ENG 312, CJ 355, senior standing, permission of the instructor; Term: 2

Topic to be selected by student with approval of instructor.  May be library research based or an original research project.  Requires written and oral presentations.  Writing intensive.

CJ498 Internship in Criminal Justice 3-6 hours
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, CJ355, and permission of the instructor by the beginning of Term 1; Term: 2 

Practical application of sociological and criminological concepts and skills. Planned and supervised professional experience related to Criminal Justice which takes place outside the formal classroom with business, industry, and private/public agencies

Certificate in Detroit Studies

The undergraduate certificate in Detroit Studies consists of at least sixteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework devoted to analysis of metropolitan Detroit.

Courses may include:

HIS 310                      Metro Detroit through Three Centuries
POL/SW/SOC 385     Community and Organizational Change
IS 320                         Detroit: An Interdisciplinary Seminar
ENG 333                     Detroit in Literature
HIS/POL 496               Senior Research Seminar, Topics in Detroit History and Politics

Other courses in development

 

Career Information

The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

Certification Candidate's Reference Information

Initial Requirements

  • Pass the MTTC Basic Skills Exam
  • Hold an undergraduate degree (in progress for undergraduate students) with a teachable major and minor*
  • Be accepted by one of Marygrove's Admissions Offices and the specific program or the Marygrove College Education Unit

Acceptance
Graduate candidates are accepted via the Graduate Admissions Office. Post-degree and undergraduate students are accepted into the college via the Undergraduate Admissions Office and then into the Education Unit after having completed EDU 203 (The Teaching Profession), documentation that can be obtained from the Education Unit Secretary in Room 214, the MTTC Basic Skills Test, and an interview.

Field Observation and Practicum Work
Be prepared to do regular field observation and practicum work in all your methods classes. This involves time for observation and participation in school situations outside of scheduled methods classes.

  • Certifiable Disciplines: Elementary candidates must have a teaching major; a minor is strongly advised. Secondary candidates must have both a teaching major and teaching minor.

Elementary
Dance - Major
Early Childhood Education - Group Minor
English - Major and Minor
French - Minor
History - Major and Minor
Integrated Science - Group Major
Language Arts - Group Major and Minor
Mathematics - Major and Minor
Social Studies - Group Major
Spanish - Minor
Special Education - Learning Disabilities

Secondary
Art - Comprehensive Group Major, no minor required
Biology - Major & Minor
Chemistry - Minor & Major
Computer Info Systems - Major & Minor
Dance - Major
Economics - Minor
English - Major & Minor
History - Major & Minor
SMathematics - Major & Minor
Music - Comprehaensive Group Major
Political Science - Major & Minor
Sociology - Minor
Social Studies - Group Major
Spanish - Minor

* Not available to post-degree candidates.

Felony Conviction
The state of Michigan does not certify felons, and school districts are required to do a felony check before hiring someone to teach. You will be asked to sign a felony form before being accepted into a program. If your status should change during your certification program, you may be asked to leave the program.

Student Teaching
Marygrove College does not waive student teaching. Student teaching placements are approved and confirmed through the Director of Student Teaching.

Please note that before you may student teach all professional courses, required classes for your teaching major and minor, and the applicable MTTC competency tests must be passed.

Provisional Certification
A candidate’s credentials will be sent to the state of Michigan for provisional certification once the following elements have been completed and verified:

  • Undergraduate degree
  • Required competency tests
  • All undergraduate coursework for teaching disciplines (major and minor where applicable) as specified in the Plan of Work **
  • Entire Marygrove College sequence of professional teaching courses
  • Confirmation of valid First Aid & CPR training
  • Completion of state mandated survey at end of student teaching placement.

** Marygrove College requires evidence that a teacher certification candidate has completed the necessary undergraduate coursework specified in the candidate’s Plan of Work. This reflects both the State of Michigan program approval of Marygrove’s certifiable disciplines, as well as the guidelines of the North Central Accreditation Association, which are followed by school districts. Please submit copies of all transcripts from other colleges showing courses applicable to your approved Plan of Work.

>> MTTC

Plan of Work

Whichever of Marygrove’s programs for initial teacher certification you choose, all graduate and post-degree candidates will need a completed plan of work indicating:

  • Teaching Level (Elementary or Secondary)
  • Teaching Major (& Minor if desired) for Elementary Candidates
  • Teaching Major and Teaching Minor for Secondary Candidates
  • Professional teaching program (GRIOT, Post-Degree, SAGE)

The plan of work will outline those courses already taken (grade of C or better) which fulfill Marygrove College’s major and minor requirements and any courses needed to complete the major and minor.

Ultimately, you will possess transcript/s that support your teaching endorsements and meet the requirements of most school districts, because Marygrove’s recommendation to the state for a provisional teaching certificate confirms the candidate’s completion of the major and minor requirements as approved by the State of Michigan for Marygrove College.

While Marygrove does not require that you take the courses for your teaching discipline with us, we certainly encourage you to do so, as our programs are carefully designed to provide the knowledge necessary to pass MTTC competency tests. If you do choose to take classes elsewhere, you must achieve a grade of C or better in order for the class to be recognized as part of your teaching discipline. You will want to consult the designated contact in that discipline in order to guarantee that the courses you take elsewhere are equivalent to those you need.

Apply to the appropriate admissions office for the program desired (Graduate or Undergraduate/Post-Degree), and they will forward your materials to complete a plan of work. The process requires a $25 transcript-review fee and takes approximately two weeks to complete.

>> Policies and Procedures Handbook (pdf)
An important reference for all initial and continuing certification candidates.

Certification for Post-Degree Students

Post-degree students can obtain Michigan provisional teacher certification by following the requirements of the undergraduate teacher certification program described above. A plan of work for teaching disciplines is facilitated by the Teacher Certification Officer through the Liberal Arts & Sciences faculty.

Chemistry Course Descriptions

CHM 130 Chemical Science 4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100; ENG 107; LS 105; Fee: yes. Term: Fall, Winter; General Education option

A descriptive and mathematical look at chemistry for the non-scientist. Conceptual development and problem solving are emphasized. Introduction to concepts of chemistry, language and theories for general and organic chemistry. Study of atomic theory, acid-base theories, mole concept and biological molecules. Laboratory included.

CHM 140 General Chemistry I: Atoms and Molecules 4 hours
Co-requisites: MTH 105; Term: Fall; Fee: yes. General Education option for science majors only

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry in a context of chemical analysis. Includes the nature of matter, periodic table, elements, ionic and covalent compounds, stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, ideal gases, and acid-base chemistry. Laboratory included.

CHM 230 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 130; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.

Brief survey of organic and biological chemistry, emphasizing applications to human physiology.  CHM 230 may not be used for major or minor credit in chemistry, biology, or forensic science.  Laboratory included.

CHM 241    General Chemistry II: Equilibrium 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 140; Term: Winter; Fee: yes.

Chemical thermodynamics; kinetics; equilibria; electrochemistry, redox reactions; nuclear chemistry; selected properties of the elements. Laboratory included.

CHM 252  Intermediate Analytical Chemistry 4 hours
Prerequisite: CHM 241; Fee: yes. Term: Winter: Offered alternate years

A study of the chemical and physical properties of inorganic compounds, the application of multistep equilibria, oxidation-reduction, and separation techniques in chemical analysis.  Emphasis on classical methods of gravimetric and titrimetric analysis. Laboratory included.

CHM 325    Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Nomenclature 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241; Term: Fall; Fee: yes.

This course begins the systematic study of the chemistry of carbon compounds—nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, predictions and trends, and introduction to synthesis. Laboratory included.

CHM 326  Organic Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 325; Term: Winter; Fee: yes.

Topics include functional group transformations, multistep synthesis, mechanisms, nucleophilic substitution, electrophilic substitution, and carbonyl chemistry. Laboratory included.

CHM 341       Physical Chemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150; CHM 241; MTH 252; PHY 252; Fee: yes. Term: Winter; Offered alternate years

Presentation of physical chemistry topics: thermodynamics, solution equilibria, chemical kinetics, transport processes, and structure with biological applications. Laboratory included.

CHM 350       Environmental Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 325; Term: Fall. Offered alternate years Cross-listed with ENV 350

Introduces students to environmental chemistry, the branch of chemistry dealing with the origins, transport, reactions, effects and fates of chemical species in the water, air, soil and living environments. 

CHM 360    Biochemistry 4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 140, CHM 325, Term: Fall; Fee: yes. Offered alternate years; Cross-listed with BIO 360

Biochemistry 360 is an advanced-level course for students majoring in chemistry or biology. This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemi­cal properties of living systems. Topics include the structure, function and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; enzyme kinetics and regulation. The principles of bioenergetics and the integration of metabolic control will be developed. Laboratory included.

CHM 388    Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, chemistry major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

CHM 390    Laboratory Analysis 4 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241; Term Winter. Fee: yes. Offered alternate years

Theory and practical application of instruments as applied to physiochemical and analytical methods.

Laboratory included.

CHM 401    Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 325; Term: Fall. Offered alternate years

Study of the chemistry of the metals and non-metals emphasizing periodic behavior, atomic and molecular structure, ionic and covalent bonding, coordination compounds, oxidation and reduction reactions, acid-base chemistry, organometallic compounds, transition metal complexes and reaction kinetics.

CHM 410  Special Topics in Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHM 241, CHM 326; Junior Status in major. Term: TBA.

Advanced study of modern synthetic reactions, including mechanisms and theoretical perspectives. Includes use of modern spectroscopic methods.

CHM 488    Cooperative Field Experience 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, chemistry major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer

Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

CHM 491  Independent Study 1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; chemistry major or minor; junior status; Term: TBA

Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 312  Junior Seminar 3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter;

Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS.  Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work.  In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports.  The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one.  A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity.  This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 496A   Science Senior Seminar: Library Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major. Term: Fall, Winter;

This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project.  Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B.  Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B   Science Senior Seminar: Laboratory Research 2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.

This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member.  The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

Child Development Course Descriptions

BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle
Term 2 (Saturday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 099, BIO 139 strongly recommended

Study of the factors affecting the health and nutrition needs of young children. Students will apply the basic principles of nutrition, food handling, and meal planning to meet the nutritional needs of children in care and education programs.

CD 213 Infant/Toddler: Care/Education
Term 2 (Monday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241,  CD 240 or equivalent experience

Study and review of knowledge related to the growth and development of infants to three years old. Students will study the current research and resources to learn about optimal methods of care and education for children in this age group. Course requirements include observation in an infant/toddler program.

CD 240 Developmental Psychology
Term 1, 2 (Monday and Wednesday)
3 hours
Prerequisite: PSY 205

An overview of human development and factors that influence development. Course covers physical‚ intellectual‚ social and emotional development from infancy through adolescence.

CD 326 Administration of Developmental Centers
Term 2 (Monday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 213, CD 240, CD 350, CD 333, CD 375, BIO 141

Study of the requirements for establishing and operating child care centers. Course work focuses on understanding and applying State of Michigan licensing rules. Course requirements include a field experience in a child care center.

CD 399 Child Development Practicum
Term 2 (Thursday)
6 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205; CD 241, CD 213,CD 223, CD 240, CD 326, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375; CD 420, or permission of instructor

Course requires participation in on-going structured and supervised field experiences in an infant/toddler or preschool program under the direction of a qualified cooperating teacher. The practicum experience will provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned, become a member of a collaborative community, and deepen their understanding of their role as members of the early childhood profession. During the practicum experience, students will have opportunities including, but not limited to: creating and implementing curriculum, creating and implementing student assessment, analyzing and applying assessment data, partnering and communicating with families, and demonstrating the ability to partner and guide the work of other adults in the educational setting. Seminar required.

CD 496 Senior Seminar
Term 1 (Thursday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 241, CD 213, CD 223, CD 240, CD 326, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375;
CD 399, CD 420 Senior status, child development; or permission of the instructor; ENG 312

Study and exploration of the major types of research design. Students will use comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in child development to support their selection of a research topic related to early childhood care and education. Students will identify articles from a selection of scholarly journals related to their chosen topics. Students will write a literature review based on identified key ideas in the literature. Students create a plan of action based on their research. Students will design, implement, and evaluate their plan and report their findings in a Case Study format. Students will report their findings in an in-class presentation. Students will begin to develop a specific area of expertise and experience the link between research and practice. This course provides a foundation for students who elect to continue their studies in Child Development at the Graduate level.

CD/ECE 223 Professional Partnerships in Early Childhood Education: Child, Family, School, and Community
Term 2 (Tuesday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 240, or equivalent experience

Study and exploration of theory and research on the impact of the multiple influences of children’s environments including the influence of culture, language, economic factors, health status, learning needs, family, technology, media, and community. Students will use their knowledge of children’s physical and psychological health to learn what constitutes child abuse and neglect and about their legal responsibilities to report suspected abuse. Students will explore their role as advocates for children, families, and the early childhood profession. Students will have opportunities to observe and interact with multiple stakeholders during field experiences.

CD/ECE 241 Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Education
Term 1 (Wednesday)
3 hours
(This is the foundational/first course in the Child Development major).

Introduction to a foundational understanding of children’s development and learning processes. Knowledge gained provides as a basis for creating and promoting learning environments that affirm the diversity of children, their families, and community contexts. Students will learn about the appropriate use and interpretation of data derived from a variety of assessment tools, and ways to use assessment data in positive partnerships with families and other professionals. In order to foster children’s social competence, students will learn ways to build community within care and learning environments. Students will use as their primary resources state and national guidelines and standards that represent what is known to represent best practices for diverse learners in care and educational settings for young children. Students will apply developmentally appropriate approaches to teaching and learning during field experiences.

CD/ECE 333 Math/Science Methods for Early Childhood
Term 1 (Monday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205,CD 241, CD 213, CD 223, CD 240, CD 350

Study of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in the content areas of math and science. Students will use their knowledge to create challenging learning environments using curricular interactions and learning materials designed to promote children’s cognitive development, positive social skills, and self-motivation. Students will create learning environments that include spontaneous activity and guided investigations appropriate to the needs of diverse learners. Students will learn to use a systematic approach to assessment to inform planning, implementing, and evaluating math and science curriculum. Students will create, implement, and assess math and science activities and curriculum during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse learners.

CD/ECE 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics
Term 2 (Thursday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 213, CD 240

Study of the theories of play and aesthetic development. Students will build an understanding of the characteristics and development of young children in play and aesthetic domains (including art, music, and drama), and will use their knowledge to create challenging and supportive environments and curriculum for diverse learners. Students will use (and adapt) appropriate assessment measures to guide them in evaluating children’s development. Students will model and teach positive social skills during play interactions to facilitate children’s development of self-control, self-motivation, and self-esteem.  Students will create, implement, and assess play and aesthetic activities and curriculum during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse learners.

CD/ECE 375 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Education
Term 1 (Tuesday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: EDU 205, CD 241, CD 213, CD 223, CD 240, CD 350

Study of the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures in the content areas of language and literacy development. Students consider the impact of children’s cultural, linguistic, and economic contexts on their language and literacy learning.  Students will learn ways to create supportive and challenging language and literacy learning environments (using curriculum interactions, teaching practices, and learning materials) to meet the needs and interests of diverse learners. Students will learn to appropriately and effectively use assessment methods to design, implement, and evaluate children’s experiences in language and literacy learning environments and will have opportunities to apply this knowledge in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse and exceptional learners.

CD/ECE 420 The Exceptional Child in Early Childhood Education
Term 2 (Wednesday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: None

Study of children’s typical and atypical developmental characteristics and needs in learning domains including physical, cognitive, social, emotional, language, and aesthetic development. Students will gain specific knowledge about developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, health problems, and learning and behavior disorders. Students will understand the teacher’s role in initiating and developing Individualized Education Programs (IEP) and Individualized Family Services Plans (IFSP), and will explore the responsibilities of all stakeholders in the process of developing and implementing educational plans to meet the needs of diverse learners. Students will explore the use of assessments for specific disabilities and the use of adaptive and assistive devices. Students will have opportunities to apply this knowledge during field experiences in early childhood care and educational settings that serve diverse and exceptional learners.

ECE 320 Literacy, Language, and the Social World in Early Childhood Education
Term 1
3 hours
Prerequisites: None

Exploration of personal experiences and assumptions about diverse cultures, languages, family contexts, and communities to facilitate critical thinking and reflection. Students will use this knowledge in creating and implementing curriculum linked to children’s languages, cultures, and communities and based on their needs and interests.  Developmentally and culturally appropriate children’s literature will be used as a primary resource in learning and applying the central concepts of social studies and world languages. Students will model and affirm anti-bias perspectives and will develop the necessary dispositions to create positive, respectful relationships with children whose cultures and languages differ from their own. Students will apply anti-bias approaches to teaching and learning during field experiences.

EDU 205 Children’s Literature
Term 1, 2 (Thursday)
3 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 240,  ENG 108

Interpretive and critical study of literature for children and adolescents is provided. An historical and categorical survey of children’s books, stressing significance in classrooms and the home, is outlined.

ECE 499 Student Teaching: Preschool
Term 2
6 hours
Prerequisites: CD 241, CD 223, CD 333, CD 350, CD 375, ECE 320, ECE 420, or permission of instructor

Students will participate in on-going structured and supervised field experiences in at least two of the three early childhood periods (i.e., infant/toddler, preschool, and early elementary through grade 3) under the direction of a qualified cooperating teacher. Students will have opportunities to demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on their work and make informed decisions. During the student teaching experience students will have opportunities, including but not limited, to: creating and implementing curriculum, creating and implementing student assessment, analyzing and applying assessment data, partnering and communicating with families, and demonstrating the ability to partner and guide the work of other adults in the educational setting. Senior status. Seminar required.

Certificate in Gerontology

 

The total credit hour requirement for the certificate is 16 hours, including:

A. Required Courses

SW 200 A            Special Topics: Substance Abuse                          2 hours
SW 237/537        Physical Aspects of Aging                                       2 hours
*SW 299              Pre-professional Practicum                                     3 hours
SW 378/578        Policies and Services for Older Persons                 2 hours
SW 410/610        Working with Older Adults                                        2 hours
PSY 346/546       Aging Individual in Society                                        3 hours

*To be arranged with approval of the director of the gerontology program.

B. Elective Courses

Select a minimum of two credit hours from the following courses:

BIO 141                 Nutrition Through the Life Cycle                            3 hours
EDU 390/590         The Adult Learner                                                  3 hours
PSY 348                 Death and Dying                                                    3 hours
RS 384                   Faith and Human Development                             3 hours
SOC 306                Ethnic and Racial Diversity                                    3 hours
SW 325                  Professional Communication                                 4 hours
SW 200 C               Working with Mental Illness                                   2 hours

 

Certificate in Child Welfare

For specific requirements and courses‚ please refer to section entitled Child Welfare in this catalog.

Certificate in Gerontology

For specific requirements and courses‚ please refer to section entitled Gerontology in this catalog.

Certificate Program in Computer Graphics

The 18-credit hour computer graphics certificate program is designed for post-degree art majors who are interested in a general introduction to the field and more in-depth experiences in computer-assisted image production.

Using the Macintosh environment, these students study paint/draw processes, electronic page layout and scanning techniques. Emphasis is given to skill-building and developing a digital aesthetic.

Course Descriptions

SJ 500: Social Foundations 2 credits

This seminar provides an overview of the program. Students identify issues, concepts and the systems that define, influence and shape the world, as well as the values associated with a just world. Opportunities to create an internal culture of justice among the candidates are provided.

SJ 503: Human Rights and the Literature 2 credits

The course is designed to enhance the understanding of human rights from the legal, historical, literary and cultural perspective. Students approach literature both as an ethical and political project, and consider the connection between human rights and literature. This course also explores whether emotions such as empathy — what literary works evoke among the readers — have a necessary relation to justice. Finally, students examine how narratives (including films) enable or disable memory, truth telling, and justice in the aftermath of atrocity.

SJ 505: Economic Analysis of Structures: Globalism 2 credits

The aim of this course is to foster understanding of the major relationships involved in the functioning of the global economy today and the perspectives of various groups that impact the realization of more just, humane and sustainable societies in the USA and in the world. Ethical evaluation in light of the principles of the human rights tradition will under gird the economic analysis.

SJ 510: Campaigns and Elections 2 credits

This course is an exploration of major facets of the US political campaigns and elections, including voter turnout and choice, grassroots activity, lobbying, and the role of money and media with special focus on the potential for reform.

SJ 520: Values in Society: Sources and Resources 2 credits

This course explores the origins and functions of values in personal and social life, including a survey of some of the principal concepts used in contemporary discussions of justice. In the collaborative framework of the seminar, students focus on how values arise, how they are articulated, how they figure in our decision making, how they shape our social institutions, how they conflict, and how those conflicts are addressed.

SJ 524: Environmental Justice 2 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the law and policy of environmental justice. Environmental justice is at the confluence of the civil rights movement and the environmental movement.  Students will develop an understanding of the scientific, economic, ethical, and legal underpinnings of environmental justice decision-making with a focus on Detroit.

SJ 525: Special Topics 3 credits

This course was designed to cover special interest areas in depth. Topics are developed each year depending upon the interests of the students and/or the community. Students may substitute this course, when offered, for the practicum requirement.

SJ 530: The Role of Psychology in Social Justice 2 credits

This seminar will investigate the psychology of social justice and consumerism with respect to local and international implications.  The seminar will further provide an understanding of the impact of materialism on groups and individuals. Examination of race and racism will be presented from the lenses of Colonialism, Post Traumatic Slavery Syndrome and the dysfunctional side of White Privilege. In addition, it will explore contemporary perspectives on spiritual and emotional intelligence as they relate to social injustices.  

SJ 605: Justice in U.S. Economic Structures 2 credits

This course provides an overview of the current system of economic relations within the United States from the perspective of increasing social justice. Students review the actors and relationships that govern the domestic economic system focusing on macroeconomic issues such as income distribution, unemployment, poverty, government policies, and the implications of corporate power. Questions related to the social and political implications of our economic system and policies, which might improve the well-being of individuals marginalized by the system, are examined.

SJ 620: Religion and Justice: Conflict and Congruence   2 credits

In this course students explore the place of religious traditions in human affairs, examine some typical religious institutions and their practices, scan a number of relevant religious documents, and discern the ways in which religion shapes, promotes, or hinders the practice of justice in society. Historical examples help clarify our current situation. The course seeks to analyze some religious values, evaluate the congruence or dissonance of professed values with policy and practice, and assess the contribution of religion in its cultural settings.

SJ 625: Leadership and Organizational Development I 2 credits

Leadership for Social Justice is a course that deepens an appreciation for the context and styles of leadership at the forefront of struggles for social justice. The course will illuminate how values and principles underpin critical leadership. Students become familiar with social justice theorists, and explore concepts such as democratic decision-making, civic engagement, and structural inequality. Students are introduced to tools needed by today’s leaders, such as systems thinking, strategic thinking, and organizational and community diagnosis.

SJ 630: Understanding through Empiricism 2 credits

In this seminar students learn about the use of psychological empiricism to support social justice issues. Differences between a subjective approach and an empirical approach are examined. Additional topics include the utility of a social science/social justice approach, the impact of under-represented groups, stereotyping, pseudo-science, and human behavior experiments. Skills to be practiced in this seminar include grant writing, bibliographic search, and presentation of a persuasive empirically based argument.

SJ 635: Leadership and Organizational Development II 2 credits

Leaders are knowledgeable about how to work with and motivate people at the interpersonal, group and community levels. This course links social justice leadership and the roots of organization development. It highlights change theory, terminology, and literature for social justice professionals pursuing an advocacy role. Students are given opportunities to build such practical skills as how to best use oneself in the service of social justice, dealing with diverse situations, active and empathic listening, strategic thinking, and more.

SJ 640: Organizing for Social Change 2 credits

This course focuses on theories, and fundamental strategies and skills for community organizing and change. Topics include the power of language, identification of social problems, understanding values and ethics within the context of community work, and frameworks for policy analysis and solutions. It also explores the basics for creating a non-profit organization.

SJ 645: The Media and Its Effects on Social Issues 2 credits

In this course students explore the impact of various media sources on societal reaction to popular social problems. Having determined the extent to which popular images create and recreate problems, policies and programs that attempt to address societal problems, students explore the pursuit of justice via media sources. A plethora of techniques and strategies is discussed to pursue and promote justice oriented solutions via media outlets.

SJ 650: Reflection Seminar 2 credits

This is the last weekend of the program. In this seminar students have the opportunity to share their social justice projects and reflect upon their transformation in the program and their role as a social advocate. Future direction and collaboration for the work that has begun is explored. Students are also encouraged to evaluate the process and content of the program.

SJ 655: Social Justice Practicum 3 credits

This course is intended to provide experience based learning in an area of special interest to the student. Candidates will work with both an on-site supervisor and a college mentor to foster growth in their areas of needed skills.

SJ 660: Master’s Project 3 credits

This course provides the opportunity for students to create their own synthesis of advanced learning while putting it into action. A college mentor offers supportive guidance throughout the process.

<<  1 [23  >>  

More Information

 First Name *
 
 Last Name *
 
 Email (we will keep your email completely private) *
 
 Phone *
 
 Zip/Postal Code
 
 Student Inquiry Type
 
 Program
 
 Start Term
 
 Message
 

Science and Math

Socialwork Programs

Dance at Marygrove

MAT Program

English at Marygrove

Back to Top