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Categories starting with C

Core Courses (6)

Each of the MAT degrees consists of 10 courses. Six core courses focus on content that all teachers need to know regardless of grade level and/or subject area and four specialty courses focus on the content specific to each program. Descriptions for each of the courses are listed on the following pages.
  • EDU 568 Teacher as Leader 
  • EDU 622 Meeting the Needs of All Students 
  • EDU 570 Instructional Design 
  • EDU 618 Effective Assessment 
  • EDU 501 Teacher as Researcher 
  • EDU 5604 Evidence-Based Interventions 
Core Courses

Certificate Programs (12)

Marygrove offers 13 areas of certification to help you gain the professional knowledge and experience you need to help you determine your own professional destiny. Why not find out more about one of the certifications that interests you?
Certificate Programs

Chemistry (4)

Are you curious? Do you like to explore problems? Do scientific questions fascinate you? Do you enjoy working in a laboratory? Do you want to better understand matter, molecules, atoms, and how they react? If so, you will be interested in a chemistry major or minor.
Chemistry

Child Development (4)

The Child Development program prepares the successful student for a career working with children from birth to age eight (8). Courses emphasize understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating young children, and the importance of family and community in developmental and educational processes.
Child Development

Child Welfare (2)

The Child Development program will prepare you to teach or work with children from birth to age eight (8). Your courses will have an emphasis on understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating that child, and the importance of family and community in the entire developmental process.
Child Welfare

Computer Graphics (1)

The Computer Graphics program is offered through the Art Department Please refer to the Art Minor programs for additional information.
Computer Graphics

Criminal Justice (4)

Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program web site. We are building an exciting new program in an emerging field and invite you to be a part of it! As a unique feature, the criminal justice major will offer cutting-edge courses in restorative justice. Restorative Justice emphasizes the ways in which crime harms relationships in the context of community. (Minnesota Dept. of Corrections) Restorative justice is a victim-centered response to crime that provides opportunities for those most directly affected by crime—the victim, the offender, their families and representatives of the community—to be directly involved in responding to the harm caused by the crime.
Criminal Justice

Items starting with C

Criminal Justice Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Community Organizer • Correction (Probation Officer, Administration) • Victim Services (Victim Advocate) Juvenile Services (Youth Advocate) • Law Enforcement (City/State Federal:  Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, F.B.I., Secret Service, • U.S. Marshal) Investigator: Identity Theft, Private Security, Crime Analyst, Forensics • Graduate School (Criminology, Forensics, Public Policy)

GENERAL INFORMATION
We are building an exciting new program in an emerging field and invite you to be a part of it.  As a unique feature, the criminal justice major will offer cutting-edge courses in restorative justice.  Restorative Justice emphasizes the ways in which crime harms relationships in the context of community. (Minnesota Department of Corrections)

Restorative justice is a victim-centered response to crime that provides opportunities for those most directly affected by crime—the victim, the offender, their families and representatives of the community—to be directly involved in responding to the harm caused by the crime.

“Competence, Compassion, Commitment,” and positive social change and service to the community are at the forefront of the Criminal Justice program.  The heart of the major is people caring about and effectively supporting other people, while promoting social justice.

The criminal justice major will offer a focused interdisciplinary exposure to all aspects of crime and criminal jus­tice. Courses in the program include those dealing with crime, youth, and the responses to crime and delinquency by criminal justice agencies and organizations in the community. The criminal justice curriculum has a liberal arts framework which prepares students for graduate school as well as for criminal justice related employment in industry or government.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice combines a core of basic and applied courses that provide the student with a practical liberal arts perspective of this growing field. The student will gain a solid understanding of the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis in the following areas: 

  • Critical Approaches to the study of crime and society
  • Alternative Methods in justice
  • Restorative Justice
  • Juvenile Justice
  • Policing
  • Courts
  • Corrections

Criminal Justice majors will have the opportunity to complete an Internship and work on community projects through ser­vice learning, which will assist students to be urban leaders in their fields, and in their communities.

CAREER INFORMATION
The criminal justice major seeks to foster the development of graduates who will be catalysts for social and personal change in the urban environment. Careers in the Criminal Justice field can be found at the grass-roots, community, local, county, state, and federal levels.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
Only required courses with a grade no lower than a C can be applied to fulfill the Criminal Justice major.

COMPUTER LITERACY REQUIREMENT
Students complete their computer literacy requirement in Criminal Justice by taking CJ 351.

WRITING INTENSIVE REQUIREMENT
All Criminal Justice majors must take CJ 351 as their writing intensive course. 

AWARDS
Students may be eligible to win the following criminal justice award based on their scholarly work. The award is the Criminal Justice Award for outstanding criminal justice student.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experiences are other features of the program. Permission of the department head is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 128 credit hours required for a degree.

PROGRAM OFFERING
The B.A. in Criminal Justice program is primarily a day program, some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.  The minor in Criminal Justice program is primarily a day program, some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule. 

Certificate in African-American Studies

A certificate in African-American Studies requires 18 credit hours, including:

A. Required Courses
POL/SOC/SW 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity
HIS 311 History of Blacks in America to 1865
HIS 312 History of Blacks in America since 1865
HIS/POL 359 History of Civil Rights
POL 320 Afro-American Politics

Select one elective from the African- American Studies core courses or electives lists.

 

Certificate in African-American Studies

A certificate in African-American Studies requires 18 credit hours, including:

A. Required Courses
POL/SOC/SW 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity
HIS 311 History of Blacks in America to 1865
HIS 312 History of Blacks in America since 1865
HIS/POL 359 History of Civil Rights
POL 320 Afro-American Politics

Select one elective from the African- American Studies core courses or electives lists.

 

CERTIFICATE IN DETROIT STUDIES

The undergraduate certificate in Detroit Studies consists of at least sixteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework devoted to analysis of metropolitan Detroit.

Courses may include:

HIS 310 Metro Detroit through Three Centuries
POL/SW/SOC 385 Community and Organizational Change
IS 320 Detroit: An Interdisciplinary Seminar
ENG 333 Detroit in Literature
HIS/POL 496 Senior Research Seminar, Topics in Detroit History and Politics

Other courses in development

COURSE DESCRIPTION
See appropriate sections of the catalog.

Certificate in Women's Studies

This certificate program has been designed for students interested in learning about the roles, perspectives, and contributions of women in an interdisciplinary context. The curriculum consists of courses offered in the social sciences, English, and the humanities. It provides students opportunities to consider women’s past history, present conditions, and future possibilities, and to understand gender as a cultural practice.

A certificate in Women’s Studies requires 18 credit hours, including:

A. Required Courses
HIS 335 Women in U.S. History
IS 324B Social Justice Seminar: Global Women’s Issues
SOC 345 Sociology of the Family

B. Elective Courses
Select three electives

AH 355 History of Women Artists
CJ/SOC 352 Women and the American Criminal Justice System
ENG 370 Literature by Women
POL 318 Global Women’s Issues and Policies
PSY 320 Psychology of Women
SOC 300 Special Topics in Sociology: Women’s Issues
SOC 492 Readings in Sociology: Women in Popular Culture

For course descriptions, see appropriate sections of this catalog.

Chemistry Overview

CAREER INFORMATION
As a chemistry student, you will have a wide variety of excellent career opportunities available to you: from teaching at the middle or secondary levels to chemical industry to government work. Chemistry majors also often pursue advanced work in graduate schools. A chemistry background is also valuable to you if you major in the health science (nutrition, clinical chemistry industrial hygiene) and as you prepare for professional training in medicine, pharmacy and dentistry.

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Clinical or Analytical Chemist • Dentist • Educator • Engineer • Environmental Chemist • Material Scientist • Medicinal/Pharmaceutical Chemist • Physician  • Physician Assistant • Research Scientist

GENERAL INFORMATION
Are you curious? Do you like to explore problems? Do scientific questions fascinate you? Do you enjoy working in a laboratory? Do you want to better understand matter, molecules, atoms, and how they react? If so, you will be interested in a chemistry major or minor.

The Chemistry Program has three major goals: (1) to provide a strong chemistry major within a liberal arts framework for those entering the profession of chemistry or preparing for graduate work; (2) to provide cognate backgrounds in chemistry for biology majors, pre-medical and dental students, medical technologists, dietitians, science educators and others who may require chemistry.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Arts with a major in chemistry is designed for both students who want a career as a professional chemist and for occupations that require a moderate training in chemistry combined with training in one or more other areas. For example, students who desire chemistry as a major in programs of pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-veterinary, pre-law, or teaching chemistry in high school. Other examples are students planning prospective careers in sales or technical service, as technical editor, writers, or secretaries, or as technical librarians, chemical patent lawyers, or forensic scientists.

The Chemistry minor provides you with the skills and theory needed for an entry-level position as a chemical technician. It will also prepare you to teach at the secondary level. A chemistry minor provides valuable background for pre-medical and pre-health careers.

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Program Scheduling
The B.A. in Chemistry program is primarily a day program, although some courses are offered in the evening on a rotating schedule.

Transfer Student Information:
The department accepts transfer credits according to the college guidelines.  However, major coursework older than 10 years, from time of admittance, will be transferred in as elective credit and may not be applied to the major. Students may petition to the department chair for the older credits to be applied towards the major.

Credit for Prior Learning
Learning derived from life experiences and from individual study is of significant academic value and can often be equated with college-level studies.  Students may earn credit by examination, tutorial study and cooperative work experience. Permission of the department chair is required to select these options. Not more than four credit hours in cooperative work experience may be counted within the 128 credit hours required for a degree.

Academic Performance Standard
Only required courses with a grade of C or better can be applied to fulfill the Chemistry major or minor.

Computer Literacy Requirement
Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) must be achieved prior to graduation. Students’ computer literacy will be evaluated and assessed through the Junior and Senior seminar course sequence.

Writing Intensive Requirement
All science majors must take ISC 312: Junior Seminar as their writing intensive course. 

Senior Seminar Requirement
Students must successfully complete ISC 496A and ISC 496B in order to graduate with a B.A. in Chemistry

Internship/Cooperative Education
It is strongly encouraged that students participate in a summer undergraduate research experience either with a Marygrove College faculty member, or by securing an off-campus internship or fellowship before they graduate.  Students may receive elective credit for an internship through CHM 388, CHM 488, and/or CHM 491.

Sigma Zeta National Honor Society
Sigma Zeta is a national science and mathematics honor society.  It was founded at Shurtleff College, in Alton, Illinois in 1926.  Today, more than sixty local chapters are active in colleges and universities across the United States.  The society encourages and fosters achievement of greater knowledge in the fields of science and mathematics.  Outstanding scholastic achievement in the fields is recognized through membership in this society.

Awards
Students may be eligible to win the following departmental awards based on their scholarly work. The awards are the American Chemistry Society for outstanding chemistry major, the Chemical Rubber Company Award for the highest achieving GPA in General Chemistry I/II, and Outstanding Graduating Science  Major.  Women in the sciences are also eligible for the Suzanne Fleming Scholarship.  This scholarship is given to a woman who demonstrates financial need, potential in science and on their scholarly work.

Child Development Overview

POTENTIAL CAREERS
The Child Development Bachelor’s Degree program is an excellent choice for students who wish to work with children from birth through the preschool period. The bachelor’s degree earned with the Child Development major leads to becoming a skilled child care provider. This degree enables the successful graduate to serve as a preschool teacher, child development center director, early childhood lead teacher, Head Start educator, early childhood assistant teacher, or home day care provider.

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Child Development program prepares the successful student for a career working with children from birth to age 5. Courses emphasize understanding the development of the young child, the best approaches to educating young children, and the importance of family and community in developmental and educational processes.

SPECIFIC INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Child Development prepares students to work with children ages birth through the preschool period (age 5) in child care settings. This program has a specific set of required courses designed for those with goals of becoming directors in early childhood centers or pre-school teachers in daycare settings. At the conclusion of the program, there is a required field practice (real classroom experience in a preschool program).

SPECIAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAM
Academic Performance
A grade point average no lower than 2.7 is required to be accepted to, and remain in, the Bachelor of Arts program in Child Development and the Early Childhood Education programs.

Transfer Students
The Child Development Program generally accepts transfer credit from accredited institutions of higher learning at the 100-200 level, except for methods credits and lab/practicum hours, which are accepted as elective credits only. Advisors make this determination.

Certificate in Women's Studies

This certificate program has been designed for students interested in learning about the roles, perspectives, and contributions of women in an interdisciplinary context. The curriculum consists of courses offered in the social sciences, English, and the humanities. It provides students opportunities to consider women’s past history, present conditions, and future possibilities, and to understand gender as a cultural practice.

Chemistry Minor

The chemistry minor requires completion of a minimum of 20 credits of the following components:

A. Required Courses (16 credits)
CHM 140       General Chemistry I: Atoms and molecules
CHM 241       General Chemistry II: Equilibrium
CHM 325       Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Nomenclature
CHM 326       Organic Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms

In addition, you must select at least one 300-level or above chemistry elective course.

 

 

Child Welfare

POTENTIAL CAREERS
Adoption Services • After School Programs • Child Development Centers • Child Protective Services • Day Care Services • Family Preservation Services • Foster Care Services • Head Start Programs • Preschool Programs • Residential Care Services • Teacher Aide Services • Teen Parent Services • Transitional Living Services

GENERAL INFORMATION
Marygrove College offers a multidisciplinary certificate program in child welfare. This certificate is intended to provide education and career opportunities for individuals who have completed at least two years of undergraduate coursework and are employed in direct service jobs focusing on the well-being of children and their families. It is also designed for professional practitioners with a baccalaureate or higher degree, who want to deepen their understanding of childhood development and are interested in developing specific leadership skills to work on behalf of children within the systems of child and family welfare.

To receive a certificate in child welfare, you must complete a minimum of 17 credit hours at Marygrove College. This includes 15 credit hours of required courses and two credit hours of elective courses.

The three-credit hour field experience in child welfare may be waived if, at present, or in the recent past, you are participating in a supervised work experience with children, or if the field practicum experience for your major is in a child welfare setting. In such cases, you would take another three credit elective course in the program.

Individuals who have knowledge and understanding of children and their unique needs are in high demand both in public and private child welfare agencies and programs. If you are currently working in, or interested in gaining employment with one of the many programs serving children that receive federal funding, you are/will be required to have at least some professional training in children’s development and their well-being.

*STATE OF MICHIGAN CERTIFICATION
Marygrove College’s Child Welfare Certificate program has been officially endorsed by the Michigan Department of Human Services (DHS). This means that as of April 11, 2014, a Marygrove student who has successfully completed requirements for the Child Welfare Certificate and successfully completed all requirements for the BSW Degree, is eligible to waive portions of the State of Michigan standard Child Welfare Training Institute. If hired as a child welfare caseworker by either DHS, or a contractual private child welfare agency, such an individual will be able to forgo Phase I of the Pre-Service Institute training (4 weeks). This reduces required training by approximately 140 hours and enables the newly hired employee to begin actual work with clients 4 weeks earlier than those without the certificate. Therefore agencies are frequently interested in hiring those individuals who have graduated from a State of Michigan approved Child Welfare Certificate program. This could positively impact your future employment opportunities. 

CAREER INFORMATION
The number of children for whom their developmental and/or welfare needs must be provided by persons other than their birth parents/nuclear family, is rapidly increasing and will continue to expand. As family demographics in the U.S. change, the number of children being raised in single parent, two working parent, blended, foster, and/or adoptive families is growing.  These diverse types of family structure greatly increase the need for care of children by persons other than the biological parent.

In addition to professional preparation, Marygrove’s child welfare program will provide you with skills to better understand the developmental needs of your own children, and it will help you to prepare for additional roles, such as those of a grandparent or relative caregiver.

If your major is child development, early childhood education, special education, social work, sociology, or psychology, you can enhance and combine your career preparation with a certificate in child welfare.

Course Descriptions

BIO 118     Medical Terminology                                           2 hours
Prerequisites: None; Term: Fall, Winter
This course is designed for students with an active interest in the medical and paramedical fields. The course provides the student with the fundamental principles needed to understand medical vocabulary. The student will learn to use the techniques of word building with an emphasis on spelling, pronunciation and the meanings of medical terms.

BIO 139     Principles of Biology                                           4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundation courses; Term: Winter, Summer; Fee: yes. General Education option – not for science majors.
This course is a survey of the major generalizations of biology with an emphasis on molecular and cellular mechanisms, organismic structures and functions, basic concepts in genetics, the principles of evolution, and the interdependence of all living things with the environment. The laboratory exercises introduce the student to the process of scientific investigation and laboratory technique. Students will examine various biological structures and survey representatives of the five kingdoms of living organisms. Laboratory included.

BIO 141      Nutrition Through the Life Cycle                        3 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 099; Term: Fall, Winter
Fundamentals of nutrition and its effect on the individual’s growth, development, and total health; related topics of current concern, including weight control, dietary fats, fiber, and world health; impact of culture and environment on food choices. Computer nutrition analysis.

BIO 150     Biology I: From Molecules to Cells                     4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108; Term Fall, Winter Fee: yes. General Education option for science majors only
Biology 150 is a course which, together with Biology 151, is designed to give the student a broad experi¬ence in the biological sciences. This course empha¬sizes the cellular and molecular aspects of biology. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

BIO 151     Biology II: Unity & Diversity of Life                     4 hours
Prerequisites: MTH 100, ENG 108; Term Winter, Fee: yes
This course is designed to give the student a broad experience in the biological sciences. In this course we deal mainly with the organismal and supra-organismal levels of biological organization. Evolution will be the unifying theme. The diversity, form, function, and ecology of organisms will be covered, with particular emphasis on plants and animals. Science majors, including many health professionals, are the intended audience. Laboratory included.

BIO 201     Ecology and the Environment                             4 hours
Prerequisites: LS 105, ENG 107; Term Fall, Summer. Fee: yes.  General Education option. Cross-listed with ENV 201
This course is a survey of the basic concepts of ecology, natural resources and ecosystems, relationships between humans and their natural environment, and the magnitude and scope of global environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills and use of the scientific method. Laboratory is included.

BIO 226     General Zoology                                                    4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151. Term: Fall; Fee: yes. Offered alternate years
This course deals with the general principles of zoology. Beginning with an introduction to the classification of the animal kingdom, the major groups of invertebrate and some vertebrate animals will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed on development, structure, function, reproduction, and evolution. Laboratory exercises will enable the student to directly observe internal and external morphology of selected animal groups and will provide for observations and experiments with various living organisms.  Laboratory included.

BIO 234     General Botany                                                      4 hours
Prerequisite: BIO 150; BIO 151, Term: Fall; Fee: yes. Offered alternate years
This course deals with a survey of the plant-like protists, the fungi, and members of the plant kingdom. Students study the process of photosynthesis and its relevance to life on our planet. They then study the life cycles and reproduction of plants. Transport systems of vascular plants are covered in detail. In addition the anatomy and physiology of all plant-like organisms, their growth and development is studied. The current success and diverse numbers and species of plants are related to their evolutionary success and role in the earth’s ecosystems. Laboratory exercises enable the students to directly observe the structure of botanical organisms and provide for observations and experiments with living organisms. A field collection of leaves is required.  Laboratory included.

BIO 257     Human Anatomy and Physiology                         4 hours
Prerequisites: Completion of developmental and foundation courses, BIO 118 recommended; Term: Fall, Summer; Fee: yes. General Education option – not for science majors.
A survey of human anatomy and physiology with selected labs. Topics include cells, metabolism, tissue and skin. Also includes the skeletal and articular, mus¬cular, digestive, circulatory and lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, reproductive and nervous systems. .  Laboratory included.

BIO 267        Clinical Anatomy and Physiology                     4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150;  BIO 118 recommended; designed for science majors and minors - not for general education; Term Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course is a study of human anatomy and physiology with virtual human cadaver labs as well as other hands on selected labs. Topics include: tissues and the following systems: integumentary; skeletal and articular, muscular, digestive; blood, cardiovascular and lymphatic circulatory, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, reproductive, nervous, and their major diseases. This class is not for general education, it is specifically for science majors and minors. .  Laboratory included.

BIO 321        Microbiology                                                       4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150 and one semester of chemistry; Term: Fall; Fee: yes.
Microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and viruses, form, structure, reproduction, genetics, physiology, me¬tabolism and identification, disease, transmission and control.  Written lab reports required.  Laboratory included.

BIO 347        The Teaching of Biology                                    3 hours
Prerequisites: Admittance into Phase III Teacher Certification Candidate; Term: Winter. Offered as needed
Philosophical basis for science teaching; survey of special programs in biology; specific objectives, materials and curriculum planning for biology; emphasis on role of laboratory in biology teaching. Observations of classroom/laboratory teaching.

BIO 360        Biochemistry                                                       4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, CHM 140, CHM 325, Term: Fall; Fee: yes. Offered alternate years; Cross-listed with CHM 360
Biochemistry 360 is an advanced-level course for students majoring in chemistry or biology. This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemi¬cal properties of living systems. Topics include the structure, function and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; enzyme kinetics and regulation. The principles of bioenergetics and the integration of metabolic control will be developed. Laboratory included.

BIO 388        Cooperative Field Experience                            1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing, biology major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

BIO 410       Special Topics in Biology                                    3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior status in the major;  Term: TBA
Selected topics and issues in biology as chosen by the instructor.  

BIO 485        Genetics                                                               4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151, CHM 140, CHM 325; Recommended MTH 325. Term: Winter; Fee: yes.  Offered alternate years
Study of hereditary material, its chemical and physical nature. Transmission and function will be emphasized. Mendelian inheritance, human genetics and evolution.  Written and oral lab reports required. Laboratory included.

BIO 488        Cooperative Field Experience                            1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Senior standing, biology major, departmental approval; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Supervised work experience in activity related to an area of specialization. This is planned in consultation with advisor, co-op supervisor and employer. Recording, reporting and evaluation of experience will be required.

BIO 490        Cell and Molecular Biology                                4 hours
Prerequisites: BIO 150, BIO 151; BIO 321 recommended, one semester of general college chemistry, one semester of organic chemistry; Term: Winter; Fee: yes. Offered alternate years
Cell doctrine, genes, cell metabolism, biosynthesis, photosynthesis, molecular replication, transcription, mutation and regulation of cell processes, biochemistry. Lab included. Formal lab reports and oral presentation required.

BIO 491        Independent Study                                            1-4 hours
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; biology major or minor; Junior status; Term: Fall, Winter, Summer
Opportunity to earn credit for the independent study of a course not listed in the catalog as a specific offering. By arrangement.

ISC 312        Junior Seminar                                                        3 hours
Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major, ENG 312; Term Fall, Winter;
Junior Seminar has been designed to help science majors improve their writing AS SCIENTISTS.  Competence in writing in science requires critical evaluation of one’s work.  In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports.  The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between the instructor and students through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one.  A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, poster presentations, ethics in science, and the nature of science and creativity.  This is the program’s writing intensive course.

ISC 496A        Science Senior Seminar: Library Research         2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 312; Senior standing in major. Term: Fall, Winter;
This course is designed for senior science majors to have the opportunity to write and orally present a research proposal. This will include conducting a literature review and designing an original research project.  Students carry out their research project in ISC 496B.  Use of computer for informational searches, data analysis, and word processing; oral presentations and final research paper required.

ISC 496B        Science Senior Seminar: Laboratory Research   2 hours
Prerequisites: ISC 496A; Senior standing in major; Term: Fall, Winter; Fee: yes.
This course is designed for senior science majors to conduct research with the direction of a faculty member.  The student will carry out a research project of their own design. Specifically students will conduct experiments, write up the results of those experiments, write up the conclusions based on those results and present the results and conclusions of the project both in written and oral formats.

Career Information

The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

The education unit is committed to helping students explore teaching as a career. Teaching has always been an exciting, challenging, and essential career that makes a critical mark on the lives of children and young adults. While qualified teachers are much in demand, teacher training opens doors to many other occupations as well.

Certificate in Child Welfare

For specific requirements and courses‚ please refer to section entitled Child Welfare in this catalog.

CERTIFICATE IN CHILD WELFARE

The total credit hour requirement for the certificate is 17 hours, including:

A. Required Courses
PSY 205 Introductory to Psychology   4 hours
BIO 141 Nutrition through the Life Cycle   3 hours
               -OR-
BIO 201 Ecology and the Environment 4 hours
SW 200A Special Topics: Substance Abuse   2 hours
SW 200B Special Topics: Working with Children and Families   2 hours
CD/SW 268 Child Welfare Policies and Services   2 hours
*SW 299 Pre-professional Practicum   3-4 hours

*To be arranged with approval of the director of the child welfare certificate program.

B. Elective Courses
CD 213 Infant/Toddler: Care/Education   3 hours
CD 223 Young Child Guidance and Parent Advocacy   3 hours
CD 326 Administration of Developmental Centers   3 hours
PSY 240 Developmental Psychology   3 hours
CD 350 Play Theory and Aesthetics 3 hours
CD 420 The Exceptional Child in Early Childhood Education 3 hours
SOC 306 Ethnic and Racial Diversity   3 hours
SOC 311 Deviant Behavior   3 hours
SOC 345 Sociology of the Family   3 hours
SW 200C Special Topics: Working with Mental Illness   2 hours

Certificate in Detroit Studies

The undergraduate certificate in Detroit Studies consists of at least sixteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework devoted to analysis of metropolitan Detroit.

Courses may include:

MUS 245                     Music of Detroit, 3 credits
This course explores the history of music within the city of Detroit. From hip-hop to classical, Detroit has made a lasting statement in nearly every genre of American music. From jazz/blues clubs of Paradise Valley to the explosion of the Motown scene, the development of techno and hardcore punk of the chaotic birth of the modern soul, we will examine Detroit's influence and contribution to a variety of genres from the 1920's to present day. No formal training in music is expected or required.
                                              
HIS 310                       Community and Organizational Change
The history of Detroit and its metropolitan area from 1701 to the present.

IS 320A                       Metro Detroit through Three Centuries, 3 credits
In this course, we apply ideas from history, economics, and literature to deepen our understanding of contemporary Detroit. We pay particular attention to several key factors—including race and class inequality, corporate deindustrialization, and local and regional development—influencing the city's present condition. Seminar sessions consist of discussions involving all members of the class and presentations by individual faculty members and students. In our discussions, we will respond to assigned readings based upon our own experiences of life in and around Detroit. Presentations by students and professors will focus on specific subjects of our research. The course will include documentary films and a tour of sites that are important to our discussions.

ENG 333                     Detroit in Literature, 3 credits
This course examines Detroit as a city in literature. Taking advantage of our familiarity with the actual setting(s) employed by poets, novelists, and authors of short fiction, we explore the issues involved in translating an environment into literature. In the process, we will attempt to “place” this city in modern and contemporary culture, probing common assumptions about it and about cities in general, examining power, wealth, and inequality; race and class; consumption and ecology; political order and social chaos.

POL/SW/SOC 385    Community and Organizational Change, 3 credits

Analysis of communities and organizations as social systems, including examination of critical problems. Also examines intervention and change strategies that appear to be effective and how they can be applied. A service-learning component may be included.

HIS/POL 496               Senior Research Seminar, Topics in Detroit History and Politics
Senior research seminar for social science majors with history and political science concentrations. In depth research and writing on a history or political science topic related to Detroit.

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